Alli Soule

6月 282019
 

Congratulations on being chosen to speak at an event! Let the anxiety preparation begin. But wait.

Did you know that social media can help you out? Yes, even now, while you plan. What's more, it can be instrumental in maximizing your entire presenter experience before, during and after your presentation. Here are some ideas to get you thinking.

Before

1. Solicit ideas online.

Most of your connections won't attend your event, but many are probably interested in your topic. Don't hesitate to get help from your network while you work on your paper or presentation. Ask them questions. Get their feedback. (And use the event hashtag -- say, #sasgf or #sasusers for example -- when you do it.)

2. Use social media for research.

Online properties like Quora, SAS Communities, Medium, SlideShare and even LinkedIn can lead to statistics, influencers or research you never knew existed. Type keywords or phrases in the basic search field on any of these websites. You never know what (or who) you might find.

3. Polish your LinkedIn (and/or Twitter) profile. (People will be looking.)

Need a checklist? Start with the Example SAS User LinkedIn Profile on communities.sas.com or Buffer's 7 Key Ingredients of a Great Twitter Bio.

4. Schedule a handful of posts.

One week before the conference or perhaps while you're en route, schedule a few posts to your social media accounts. You'll be too busy at the conference to do this. Free tools like Buffer or Hootsuite allow you to schedule posts throughout the week.

During

5. Skim activity around the event hashtag feed to like, reply, share or comment.

Don't know how? Enter the event hashtag, for instance "#sasgf" (no quotation marks), in the main search fields on Twitter and LinkedIn. Doing this is good for a few reasons:

  • It's easy. Especially since you'll be so busy during the event.
  • People (even strangers) appreciate when you interact with their event posts.
  • Social activity during an event is a sure-fire way to gain followers.

6. Post the occasional photo or a useful tip from a particularly inspirational session.

You'll be so busy during the event, it will be hard to find time to post. If you can, do it in small pieces. A favorite stat. A meaningful quote. A beautiful view of the venue. (Remember, use the event hashtag or other topic-specific hashtags when you do.)

After

7. Connect on LinkedIn or SAS Communities.

Immediately after the event (ideally, in less than 24 hours), connect with fellow conference goers on LinkedIn. Be sure to personalize your invitation with a brief note in case they forgot your name. Don't want to wait? Connect with them in person using the LinkedIn QR code trick.

Is your new friend fairly technical? If so, find and follow his or her activity on communities.sas.com (See subhead "How do I search for people?").

8. Add your paper or presentation to your LinkedIn profile (and direct people to it).

There are three sections of your profile where you can add media (in the form of hyperlinks, documents, PowerPoint slides, etc.): your Summary, Experience and Education sections. Professionals: Add your paper or presentation slides to your Summary or Experience sections; students: consider your Education section.

Pro tip: For additional profile views, create a post to point connections to it on your profile or mention it during your presentation.

 

 

 

 

 

9. Write a useful blog post.

Alison Bolen wrote about this in 2012, yet her message remains perfectly relevant: How to transform your live event blogging into evergreen content. The bottom line? Readers care about the content, not the conference.

Nine #SocialMedia Speaker Tips to Use Before, During and After Events was published on SAS Users.

6月 282019
 

Congratulations on being chosen to speak at an event! Let the anxiety preparation begin. But wait.

Did you know that social media can help you out? Yes, even now, while you plan. What's more, it can be instrumental in maximizing your entire presenter experience before, during and after your presentation. Here are some ideas to get you thinking.

Before

1. Solicit ideas online.

Most of your connections won't attend your event, but many are probably interested in your topic. Don't hesitate to get help from your network while you work on your paper or presentation. Ask them questions. Get their feedback. (And use the event hashtag -- say, #sasgf or #sasusers for example -- when you do it.)

2. Use social media for research.

Online properties like Quora, SAS Communities, Medium, SlideShare and even LinkedIn can lead to statistics, influencers or research you never knew existed. Type keywords or phrases in the basic search field on any of these websites. You never know what (or who) you might find.

3. Polish your LinkedIn (and/or Twitter) profile. (People will be looking.)

Need a checklist? Start with the Example SAS User LinkedIn Profile on communities.sas.com or Buffer's 7 Key Ingredients of a Great Twitter Bio.

4. Schedule a handful of posts.

One week before the conference or perhaps while you're en route, schedule a few posts to your social media accounts. You'll be too busy at the conference to do this. Free tools like Buffer or Hootsuite allow you to schedule posts throughout the week.

During

5. Skim activity around the event hashtag feed to like, reply, share or comment.

Don't know how? Enter the event hashtag, for instance "#sasgf" (no quotation marks), in the main search fields on Twitter and LinkedIn. Doing this is good for a few reasons:

  • It's easy. Especially since you'll be so busy during the event.
  • People (even strangers) appreciate when you interact with their event posts.
  • Social activity during an event is a sure-fire way to gain followers.

6. Post the occasional photo or a useful tip from a particularly inspirational session.

You'll be so busy during the event, it will be hard to find time to post. If you can, do it in small pieces. A favorite stat. A meaningful quote. A beautiful view of the venue. (Remember, use the event hashtag or other topic-specific hashtags when you do.)

After

7. Connect on LinkedIn or SAS Communities.

Immediately after the event (ideally, in less than 24 hours), connect with fellow conference goers on LinkedIn. Be sure to personalize your invitation with a brief note in case they forgot your name. Don't want to wait? Connect with them in person using the LinkedIn QR code trick.

Is your new friend fairly technical? If so, find and follow his or her activity on communities.sas.com (See subhead "How do I search for people?").

8. Add your paper or presentation to your LinkedIn profile (and direct people to it).

There are three sections of your profile where you can add media (in the form of hyperlinks, documents, PowerPoint slides, etc.): your Summary, Experience and Education sections. Professionals: Add your paper or presentation slides to your Summary or Experience sections; students: consider your Education section.

Pro tip: For additional profile views, create a post to point connections to it on your profile or mention it during your presentation.

 

 

 

 

 

9. Write a useful blog post.

Alison Bolen wrote about this in 2012, yet her message remains perfectly relevant: How to transform your live event blogging into evergreen content. The bottom line? Readers care about the content, not the conference.

Nine #SocialMedia Speaker Tips to Use Before, During and After Events was published on SAS Users.

3月 262014
 
Retired four-star General Colin Powell discussed the traits he shared with SAS CEO Jim Goodnight during his morning keynote at the SAS Global Forum Executive Conference yesterday. Among them: A clear passion for education, an appreciation for information and a sincere leadership style. “I’d like to talk about something that’s important in […]
3月 252014
 
SAS Senior Vice President and Chief Marketing Officer Jim Davis welcomed the Opening Session audience at SAS Global Forumall too appropriately: by using text analytics to create a word cloud, based on CEO Jim Goodnight’s remarks just minutes before. And he honed in on a word that stood out to [...]
5月 012012
 

When David Gumpert-Hersh took over as Vice President of Credit Risk at Wescom Credit Union in 2008, the organization – like so many other financial institutions at that time – was in a bit of a bind.

“There was no data,” he said. “There was literally no data. Zero. So we started from scratch.”

In his presentation at the SAS® Global Forum Executive Conference, Gaining Competitive Edge with Analytics for Credit Risk, Gumpert-Hersh went through a granular account of the “lifecycle of the analytic process.”

At the time he started, there wasn’t an analytic or credit risk department at the organization, so it was up to him to find data, figure out a way to pull it into a system and segment it. To start, Gumpert-Hersh made a few changes.

“I stopped all the pre-approval programs,” he said, referencing the direct mail campaigns that guaranteed a credit card without a credit check or income verification - only needing a signature. “With that you have a lot of inherent risk that you’re taking on that’s not transparent to your risk models.”

It gave Wescom a chance to catch its breath and start collecting data the right way.

Mitigation, then management

In 2011, the pre-approval program began again. This time, Wescom was pricing more accurately for its customers and its risk. As a result, the acceptance rate was triple what Gumpert-Hersh anticipated, which fostered a favorable bump to portfolio loans and an increased engagement with the customer. 

"It turned out to be a huge profitability point that we’d been ignoring for 76 years - since the credit union started,” he said. “It turned intuition on its head, and we started moving further into the detailed analytics.” 

Using analytics also allowed Gumpert-Hersh and his team to use econometrics to evaluate how many of their services were trending, thereby giving signals to the state of the economy. In a graph that laid out econometrics for Q4 2011, he was able to pinpoint the time when things began looking up.

“You could say in the end of 2011 is the first point when you started to see everything together – not just delinquencies, not just rates, not just income – actually turn toward recovery,” he said. “It was kind of a celebratory time.”

The celebration didn’t last too long because the same econometrics allowed his team to see the effects of the European economic downturn. However, projections for next year look promising. “It’s not so good right now, but it’ll get better,” he said.

Mitigation as a relationship builder 

Gumpert-Hersh also touched on Wescom’s credit suspension initiative, which functioned on the premise of temporarily freezing portions of lines of credit rather than closing them. In fact, throughout the economic downturn, Wescom has never closed a line of credit.

It was an opportunity for Wescom to mitigate risk, while also giving credit union members a chance to get back on their feet financially rather than falling deeper into debt. And if their parameters changed, they would get back what they “lost” in suspension, he said.

As a result, exposure at default was reduced by 30 percent, meaning balances in default status were 30 percent less than they would have been – saving Wescom’s bottom line and preventing customers from getting deeper into debt.


Here are two great papers from SAS Global Forum that might interest those of you in the financial services industry and those working in credit risk management:

tags: credit risk, papers & presentations, SAS Global Forum
4月 262012
 

Chris Hemedinger, Principal Technical Architect and veritable SAS celebrity, shared observations from his many years participating in SAS Global Forum as well as his favorite moments from this year’s event in a rousing keynote during a packed Closing Session yesterday.

His presentation, “You don’t have to go home … but you can’t stay here,” began with Hemedinger taking the audience through some of his own trepidation in preparing to speak.

He referenced a comment from Annette Harris, Vice President of SAS Technical Support, who mentioned the challenge of speaking after Technology Connection keynoter, legendary NFL quarterback Joe Theismann. Hemedinger argued that the act he had to follow was tougher. “It’s you,” he said gesturing to the audience members, many of whom spoke and presented during the SAS Global Forum festivities. “Hopefully I’ll live up to the challenge.

He found himself asking, “What could I do to make it special and memorable?” Being the technical architect that he is, Hemedinger went so far as to build a diagram of how the standard closing session speech would look.

It was a photo of him, with a bubble above his head and the words “blah blah blah blah” repeating roughly 30 times.

Standard closing session High-performance Hemedinger

Hemedinger also mentioned SAS Executive Vice President and Chief Marketing Officer Jim Davis’ holographic conversation with himself during Sunday night’s Opening Session. “We saw two Jim Davises,” he said. “Or maybe it’s Dav-i?” He said the presentation was so impressive because two Jim Davises could technically deliver twice the content.

It got Hemedinger thinking, what if he could have not two, but 30 holographic images of himself? “I could have a high-performance closing session!” he joked. “Blow through it all, in like 30 seconds, and we can all move on to the next thing.”

Hemedinger then moved on to talk about his experiences with users over the years and how it has changed. It used to be that many SAS employees’ only interactions with users were during SAS Global Forum and that they would go 11 ½ months without talking to users. “Social media has spoiled us,” Hemedinger said. Now, thanks to his blog, The SAS Dummy, Hemedinger is never far from his base of readers.

Hemedinger lauded the event as a whole and thanked users for their unyielding support of SAS over the years. It’s an event that Hemedinger said he becomes a little more involved in every year.  “The more you see about how SAS Global Forum is run, the more impressive it becomes. It’s nothing short of amazing to me.”

tags: closing session, SAS Global Forum, the sas dummy