analytics

6月 202018
 

Our company talks to utilities all over the world about the value of analytics. We like to talk about "the digital utility" and break down analytics use cases across: assets and operations; customers; portfolio; and corporate operations. I plan to highlight a few analytics use cases for utilities across these four areas [...]

Analytics use cases for utilities: Corporate operations was published on SAS Voices by David Pope

6月 192018
 

We have entered the “second machine age.” The first machine age began with the industrial revolution, which was driven primarily by technology innovation. The ability to generate massive amounts of mechanical power made humans more productive. Where the steam engine started the industrial revolution, the second machine age has taken [...]

Will artificial intelligence replace humans? was published on SAS Voices by Charlie Chase

6月 192018
 

When making a new piece of code, I like to use the smallest font I can read. This lets me fit more text on the screen at once. When presenting code to others, especially in a classroom setting, I like to make the font large enough to see from the back of the room. Here’s how I change font size in SAS in our three programming interfaces.

The post Changing font size in SAS appeared first on SAS Learning Post.

6月 132018
 

What do the New York Mets, the Orlando Magic and the Boston Bruins all have in common? They all use SAS analytics to gain deeper insights into athlete recruitment, retention, performance, safety and more. And after seeing the success teams like these have had using analytics, collegiate sports are turning [...]

The key to success in college sports? Analytics. was published on SAS Voices by Georgia Mariani

6月 062018
 

You've probably seen in the news that a volcano erupted in Guatemala recently. But do you really know much about this volcano, or even where it's located? Hopefully this blog post will get you up to speed on your volcanology! Pictures of a recent volcano erupting in Hawaii show slow-moving [...]

The post Where is that volcano in Guatemala? appeared first on SAS Learning Post.

5月 302018
 

developing foolproof solutionsAs oil and water, hardware and software don't mix, but rather work hand-in-hand together to deliver value to us, their creators. But sometimes, we make mistakes, behave erratically, or deal with others who might make mistakes, behave erratically, or even take advantage of our technologies.

Therefore, it is imperative for developers, whether hardware or software engineers, to foresee unintended (probable or improbable) system usages and implement features that will make their creations foolproof, that is protected from misuse.

In this post I won’t lecture you about various techniques of developing foolproof solutions, nor will I present even a single snippet of code. Its purpose is to stimulate your multidimensional view of problems, to unleash your creativity and to empower you to become better at solving problems, whether you develop or test software or hardware, market or sell it, write about it, or just use it.

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The anecdote I’m about to tell you originated in Russia, but since there was no way to translate this fictitious story exactly without losing its meaning, I attempted to preserve its essence while adapting it to the “English ear” with some help from Sir Arthur Conan Doyle. Well, sort of. Here goes.

The Art of Deduction

Mr. Sherlock Holmes and Dr. Watson were traveling in an automobile in northern Russia. After many miles alone on the road, they saw a truck behind them. Soon enough, the truck pulled ahead, and after making some coughing noises, suddenly stopped right in front of them. Sherlock Holmes stopped their car as well.

Dr. Watson: What happened? Has it broken?

Holmes: I don’t think so. Obviously, it ran out of gas.

The truck driver got out of his cabin, grabbed a bucket hanging under the back of the truck and ran towards a ditch on the road shoulder. He filled the bucket with standing water from the ditch and ran back to his truck. Then, without hesitation, he carefully poured the bucketful of water into the gas tank. Obviously in full confidence of what he’s doing, he returned to the truck, started the engine, and drove away.

Dr. Watson (in astonishment): What just happened? Are Russian ditches filled with gasoline?

Holmes: Relax, dear Watson, it was ordinary ditch water. But I wouldn’t suggest drinking it.

Dr. Watson (still in disbelief): What, do their truck engines work on water, then?

Holmes: Of course not, it’s a regular Diesel engine.

Dr. Watson: Then how is that possible? If the truck was out of gas, how was it able to start back up after water was added to the tank?!

Who knew Sherlock Holmes had such engineering acumen!

Holmes: “Elementary, my dear Watson. The fuel intake pipe is raised a couple inches above the bottom of the gas tank. That produces the effect of seemingly running out of gas when the fuel falls below the pipe, even though there is still some gas left in the tank. Remember, oil and water don't mix.  When the truck driver poured a bucketful of water into the gas tank, that water – having a higher density than the Diesel fuel – settled in the bottom, pushing the fuel above the intake opening thus making it possible to pump it to the engine.”

After a long pause – longer than it usually takes to come to grips with reality – Dr. Watson whispered in bewilderment.

Dr. Watson: Я не понимаю, I don’t understand!

Then, still shaken, he asked the only logical question a normal person could possibly ask under the circumstances.

Dr. Watson: Why would they raise the fuel intake pipe from the tank bottom in the first place?

Holmes: Ah, Watson, it must be to make it foolproof. What if some fool decides to pour a bucket of water in the gas tank!

You May Also Like: Are you solving the wrong problem?

Are you developing foolproof solutions? was published on SAS Users.

5月 152018
 

Editor's note: Learn more about SAS 360 Plan, the latest addition to the SAS Customer Intelligence 360 solution. We all know that digital platforms have transformed the role of marketing in the last few years; however, in many organizations, marketing operations hasn’t kept pace with that innovation. Marketers need to be [...]

Purpose-driven marketing planning with SAS Customer Intelligence 360 was published on Customer Intelligence Blog.

5月 012018
 

As health care evolves, its entire ecosystem – from payers and providers to pharmaceutical companies and government agencies – seeks to find common ground. More data is available than ever. But transforming information into innovation is challenging. Organizations strive to create shared goals, internally and externally, trying to improve patient [...]

How will IoT and AI drive transformation in health care and life sciences? was published on SAS Voices by Kristine Vick

4月 302018
 

How old was the oldest person in your family, or the oldest person you personally know? And how do they compare to the oldest people in the world? ... Perhaps you can easily make the comparison, with this cool graph! But before we get started, here's a picture of my [...]

The post Keeping track of the oldest people in the world appeared first on SAS Learning Post.

4月 232018
 

Plastic pollution in the oceans is becoming a huge problem. And, as with any problem, finding the solution starts with identifying the source of the problem. A recent study estimated that 95% of the plastic pollution in our oceans comes from 10 rivers - let's put some visual analytics to [...]

The post Can you guess which 10 rivers produce 95% of ocean's plastic pollution? appeared first on SAS Learning Post.