Business Intelligence

2月 272019
 

In this post, we continue our discussion of geography variables, the foundation of Visual Analytics Geo maps. This time we will look at Custom Coordinates.  As with any statistical graph, understanding your data is key.  But when using Custom Coordinates for geographic maps, this understanding becomes even more important.

Use the Custom Coordinate geography variable when your data does not match one of VA’s predefined geography types (see previous post, Fundamentals of SAS Visual Analytics geo maps).  For Custom coordinates, your data set must include latitude and longitude values as separate variables.   These values should be sourced from trustworthy providers and validated for accuracy prior to loading into VA.

When using Custom Coordinates, the Coordinate Space must also be considered.  The coordinate space defines the grid used to plot your data.  The underlying map is also based on a grid.  In order for your data to display correctly on a map, these grids must match.  Visual Analytics uses the World Geodetic System (WGS84) as the default coordinate space (grid).  This will work for most scenarios, including the example below.

Once you have selected a dataset and confirmed it contains the required spatial information, you can now create a Custom Geography variable.  In this example, I am using the variable Business Address from the dataset Wake_Co_Pizza.  Let’s get started.

  1. Begin by opening VA and navigate to the Data panel on the left of the application.
  2. Select the dataset and locate the variable that you wish to map. Click the down arrow to the right of the variable and chose ‘Geography’ from the Classification dropdown menu.
  3. The ‘Edit Geography Item’ window appears. Select Custom coordinates in the ‘Geography data type’ dropdown.   Three new dropdown lists appear that are specific to the Custom coordinates data type: ‘Latitude (y)’, ‘Longitude (x)’ and ‘Coordinate Space’.

When using the Custom coordinates data type, we must tell VA where to find the spatial data in our dataset.  We do this using the Latitude (y) and Longitude (x) dropdown lists.  They contain all measures from your dataset.  In this example, the variable ‘Latitude World Geodetic System’ contains our latitude values and the variable  ‘Longitude World Geodetic System’ contains our longitude values.   The ‘Coordinate Space’ dropdown defaults to World Geodetic System (WGS84) and is the correct choice for this example.

  1. Click the OK button to complete the setup once the latitude and longitude variables have been selected from their respective dropdown lists. You should see a new ‘Geography’ section in the Data panel.  The name of the variable (or its edited value) will be displayed beside a globe icon to indicate it is a geography variable.  In this case we see the variable Business Address.

 

Congratulations!  You have now created a custom geography variable and are ready to display it on a map.  To do this, simply drag it from the Data panel and drop it on the report canvas.  The auto-map feature of VA will recognize it as a geography variable and display the data as a bubble map with an OpenStreetMap background.

In this post, we created a custom geography variable using the default Coordinate Space.  Using a custom geography variable gives you the flexibility of mapping data sets that contain valid latitude and longitude values.  Next time, we will take our exploration of the geography variable one step further and explore using custom polygons in your maps.

Using Custom Coordinates for map creation in SAS Visual Analytics was published on SAS Users.

2月 082019
 

Creating a map with SAS Visual Analytics begins with the geographic variable.  The geographic variable is a special type of data variable where each item has a latitude and longitude value.  For maximum flexibility, VA supports three types of geography variables:

  1. Predefined
  2. Custom coordinates
  3. Custom polygons

This is the first in a series of posts that will discuss each type of geography variable and their creation. The predefined geography variable is the easiest and quickest way to begin and will be the focus of this post.

SAS Visual Analytics comes with nine (9) predefined geographic lookup types.  This lookup method requires that your data contains a variable matching one of these nine data types:

  • Country or Region Names – Full proper name of a country or region (ISO 3166-1)
  • Country or Region ISO 2-Letter Codes – Alpha-2 country code (ISO 3166-1)
  • Country or Region ISO Numeric Codes – Numeric-3 country code (ISO 3166-1)
  • Country or Region SAS Map ID Values – SAS ID values from MPASGFK continent data sets
  • Subdivision (State, Province) Names – Full proper name for level 2 admin regions (ISO 3166-2)
  • Subdivision (State, Province) SAS Map ID Values – SAS ID values from MAPSGFK continent data sets (Level 1)
  • US State Names – Full proper name for US State
  • US State Abbreviations – Two letter US State abbreviation
  • US Zip Codes – A 5-digit US zip code (no regions)

Once you have identified a variable in your dataset matching one of these types, you are ready to begin.  For our example map, the dataset 'Crime' and variable 'State name' will be used.  Let’s get started.

Creating a predefined geography variable in SAS Visual Analytics

  1. Begin by opening VA and navigate to the Data panel on the left of the application.
  2. Select the desired dataset and locate a variable that matches one of the predefined lookup types discussed above. Click the down arrow to the right of the variable and select ‘Geography’ from the Classification dropdown menu.
  3. The ‘Edit Geography Item’ window will open. Depending upon the type of geography variable selected, some of the options on this dialog will vary.  The 'Name' textbox is common for all types and will contain the variable selected from your dataset.  Edit this label as needed to make it more user friendly for your intended audience.
  4. The ‘Geography data type’ drop down list is where you select the desired type of geography variable.  In this example, we are using the default predefined option.
  5. Locate the 'Name or code context' dropdown list.  Select the type of predefined variable that matches the data type of the variable chosen from your data.  Once selected, VA scans your data and does an internal lookup on each data item.  This process identifies latitude and longitude values for each item of your dataset.  Lookup results are shown on the right of the window as a percentage and a thumbnail size map.  The thumbnail map displays the the first 100 matches.
  6. If there are any unmatched data items, the first 5 will be displayed.  This may provide a better understanding of your data.  In this example, it is clear from variable name as to what type should be selected (US State Names).  However, in most cases that choice will not be this obvious.  The lesson here, know your data!

Unmatched data items indicators

Once you are satisfied with the matched results, click the OK button to continue.  You should see a new section in the Data panel labeled ‘Geography’.  The name of the variable will be displayed beside a globe icon. This icon represents the geography variable and provides confirmation it was created successfully.

Icon change for geography variable

Now that the geography variable has been created, we are ready to create a map.  To do this, simply drag it from the Data panel and drop it on the VA report canvas.  The auto-map feature of VA will recognize the geography variable and create a bubble map with an OpenStreetMap background.  Congratulations!  You have just created your first map in VA.

Bubble map created with predefined geography variable

The concept of a geography variable was introduced in this post as the foundation for creating all maps in VA.  Using the predefined geography variable is the quickest way to get started with Geo maps.  In situations when the predefined type is not possible, using one of VA's custom geography types becomes necessary.  These scenarios will be discussed in future blog posts.

Fundamentals of SAS Visual Analytics geo maps was published on SAS Users.

9月 252018
 

If you use SAS Visual Analytics and don’t have the SAS Visual Analytics app, you're missing out on a ton of convenience and interaction you could be having while on-the-go. And even if you don’t have access to SAS Visual Analytics today, you can still download and try the mobile app with some cool sample reports.

Ready to take a quick dive and look at the app?

How to get the app

Download and install the free app to your Apple, Android or Windows device from the app store:

Apple iTunes Store
Google Play
Microsoft Store

When you open the app, you are greeted with an introductory launch screen:

In the introductory launch screen that displays when you first open the iOS or Android app, go to the third screen and tap on Learn how to use the Tray.

You are taken to the SAS Help Center. Watch the short slide show at the help center to understand the special Tray feature in the iOS or Android app or to find out what’s new in the app.

Using the Windows-based app? Here’s what you see:

Sample reports on the SAS Demo Server

In the app, sample charts and reports are instantly made available to you in the Subscriptions view via a connection to the SAS Demo Server. This server hosts a nice variety of reports that you can view on your phone or tablet. Interact with a wide spectrum of sample SAS Visual Analytics reports for different industries.

Subscriptions View in the App With Sample Reports

Tap on Add to view the different folders that contain additional sample reports for you to browse, subscribe, and view.

Additional Sample Reports on the SAS Demo Server

When you select and subscribe to the additional reports that are available on the SAS Demo Server, these reports are downloaded to the Subscriptions view in the mobile app. Just tap on the tile for any report in the Subscriptions view to open it and view the charts, graphs, and their associated data.

Here are a couple of reports as viewed in the Windows 10 app:

Already have SAS Visual Analytics in your organization?

If you view SAS Visual Analytics reports on your laptop or a desktop computer, this app extends your ability to view those same reports on your phone or tablet. If your organization has deployed SAS Visual Analytics, but is not taking advantage of extending report viewing ability to mobile devices, I urge you to consider it.

The app supports SAS Visual Analytics 8.3, 8.2, 7.4, and 7.3. Almost every type of interaction that you have with a SAS Visual Analytics report on your desktop can be done with reports viewed in the app on your phone or tablet!

If you have SAS Visual Analytics deployed in your organization, reach out to the SAS Visual Analytics administrator in your organization and ask them to enable support for mobile devices so that you can start viewing your reports in the app.

To give you a little more guidance, here are some FAQs about the app.

If we have reports in our organization that were created with SAS Visual Analytics, can we view those reports in this app?

Yes. The same reports that you view in your web browser on a desktop can be viewed in the mobile app.

How do I view our organization’s reports in the app?

Access from your mobile device to SAS Visual Analytics reports on your company’s server is granted by your SAS Administrator. Live data access requires either a Wi-Fi or cellular connection, and your company may require VPN access or other company-specific security measures.

Contact your SAS Visual Analytics Administrator to request access from your mobile device to the server hosting your SAS Visual Analytics reports. Your administrator ensures that your mobile device is registered as a valid device in the SAS Environment Manager where mobile device access to your organization’s server is managed.

How do I add a server connection?

When your mobile device is registered for access to the SAS Visual Analytics server, simply create a server connection within the app to your company server and browse for reports.

Here’s a nice slide show with the steps you follow to create a server connection to the SAS Visual Analytics server by entering the complete server name, port number, your username, and password:

Quick primer on the SAS Visual Analytics app was published on SAS Users.

8月 222018
 

As a fun side project I recently looked into alternative visualization techniques in order to use computers to create art. An interesting approach is pointillism, which, according to Wikipedia is a "technique of painting in which small, distinct dots of color are applied in patterns to form an image." This [...]

Pointillistic art with SAS® Visual Analytics was published on SAS Voices by Falko Schulz

6月 302018
 

Introduced with SAS Visual Analytics 8.2 is a new object named: Key Value. The intent of this object is call attention to an aggregated value for a measure, a category, or both. For additional specifics,

I’ve mocked up several reports to show some of the combinations available to give you an idea of what the Key Value object can look like. Toward the end of the blog, I will add additional reports to provide design ideas for placement and action assignments. Click on any image to enlarge.

Text Style with Measure Value Highlight

Here you can see in the report, I am highlighting two measure values. Both are representing the Highest value but I selected one to show the aggregation and the other not. I was able to mimic similar headings by renaming my data item. Be sure to look at the Options and Roles pane for the assignments to understand how I accomplished this.

Infographic Style with Measure Value Highlight

Here is the same information represented using the Infographic style. Seeing the same report using the different styles allows you to quickly determine the most powerful and appropriate visualization to meet your needs. We cannot control the size of the circle, only the color. In this case, the circles are different thicknesses because of the number of characters used to represent the measure values inside the visual.

Text Style displaying both Measure Value and Category

In this report, I have shown how to use the Text style to display both a Category value and a Measure value. As you can see, only one can be Highlighted, i.e. given the largest font. Notice that in this report I used the object’s Title to help explain the key value being displayed, this is a recommended best practice.

Infographic Style displaying both Measure Value and Category

Below I am using the Infographic style and notice in the Options pane below that I had to use the Additional information attribute to better label the data. Make sure that when you are in the design phase and toggling between text and infographic to review and test the available Key Value Style attributes to better label the visual.

Text Style with Category Value Highlight

In this report, I show how to highlight the Category value using the Text style. Since I chose to not use any of the available label attributes it is critical that I use the object’s Title to better explain the key value displayed.

Infographic Style with Category Value Highlight

In this report, you can see how I changed the layout from the previous report to make the Key Value object side-by-side the other report objects. If you are interested in using the Infographic style with the circle enabled then you may have to adjust your report design to accommodate for the space the circle needs to display. Remember not to shy away from adding white space to your report, it can assist when adding emphasis to a particular visual, in this case a key value.

Summary

Some important things to remember about using the Key Value object in your reports:

  • Use the Key Value object’s Title to inform your users what the number or category value represents so there is no ambiguity as to if they are looking at the maximum or minimum value.
  • When determining which style you prefer, Text or Infographic, it may be easier to make a duplicate of the Page and then adjust the style attributes till you find the desired combination.
  • Take time to adjust the arrangement of objects on your report to get the most pleasing configuration. Don’t shy away from leaving white space in your report. You can also experiment with the Container object using the Precision container type to layer the Key Value object.
  • The Key Value object will be affected by Report and Page Prompts like any other report object and you can even define Actions to filter the Key Value object.

Here are some additional examples of using the Key Value object:

In this example, you can see from the Actions Diagram how the Key Value object is being filtered. First, by the two page prompts and second, there is a direct filter action defined from the List Control object

In this example, we can see from the Actions Diagram that I used the Container object. I then selected the Precision container type and overlaid the Key Value object on the Line Chart. The only filters applied to these report objects are the page prompts.

And in this last example, you can see how I have no Report or Page prompts or any other filters impacting the Key Value objects. Therefore, these values are representative for the entire data.

Key Value Object in SAS Visual Analytics was published on SAS Users.

6月 072018
 

Light lengthens the day and allows us more time to learn, socialize, contemplate and create. Exploring NASA nighttime satellite images shows how illumination patterns have changed over time. Increases and decreases in illumination show the effects of human civilization on earth. From population collapse and destruction in war zones to economic [...]

The dark side: analyzing global changes in nighttime illumination was published on SAS Voices by Falko Schulz

6月 012018
 

You will not find an object in SAS Visual Analytics named Dynamic Text. Instead, you will find a Text object that allows you to insert dynamically driven data items. By using the Text object’s dynamic capabilities you can build custom report titles, object titles, emphasize measures and even supply the last modified time of the data source in your SAS Visual Analytics Report. In this post, I will outline the ways how you can leverage the Text object’s dynamic capabilities.

In this example report below, I have used a red font color to indicate the dynamically driven text.
Dynamic Text in a SAS Visual Analytics Report

Let’s take a look the available dynamic roles in the Text object. You can see from the Objects pane that the Text object is grouped under Other.

From the Data pane we have the ability to add both Measure and Parameter data items. From the interactive editor of the Text object shown below, we also have the ability to insert the Table Modified Time and Interactive Filters.

The following sections will demonstrate how to configure each of these dynamically driven elements of the Text object.

Interactive Filters

The out of the box display for Interactive Filters includes the selected values for control objects added to either the Report or Page Prompt areas.

To edit, be sure you are in Edit mode of Explore and Visualize. Click on the Text object to make it the active window and double click inside, then the interactive editor will open. Next, click on the Interactive Filters button. Use your cursor to position where you would like to add static text. In this case, I added the qualifier Default filter information:.

Multiple control object values are separated by a comma and also accommodates multi-value control objects.

Parameters

While the Interactive Filter functionality is extremely useful, you may want to use prompt values more granularly to create custom report titles or even object titles. To do this, you must first create a parameter to hold the value selected in the control object, then use that parameter in the Text object.

In my example report, I have two prompts and two custom object titles leveraging parameters. Let’s look at each one individually.

First is the Report Prompt, which prompts for year.

1.     Create your prompt by using the Control object of your choice and assigning the desired data role.
2.     Create a parameter that corresponds to the data type and assign it to the Control object’s Parameter Role.
3.     For the Text object, assign the same parameter to the Text object’s Parameter Role.
4.     Double click on the Text object, use your cursor to add static text as you like.

The steps are similar for the Page Prompt, which prompts for region.

1.     Create your prompt by using the Control object of your choice and assigning the desired data role.
2.     Create a parameter that corresponds to the data type and assign it to the Control object’s Parameter Role.
3.     For the Text object, assign the same parameter to the Text object’s Parameter Role.
4.     Double click on the Text object, use your cursor to add static text as you like.

Even though I demonstrate how to do this for both Report and Page Prompts, this same technique can be used for report canvas prompts. You just have to be sure you store the selected value(s) in a parameter that you can then use in the Text object’s Parameter Role.

Measures

Very much the same way the Text object’s Roles are used to assign the Parameter values, we can do the same thing with a measure. This measure will be affected by any Report or Page Prompts automatically, but if you want to use a report canvas prompt you will need to create the Actions to the Text object appropriately.

Here you can see we are using the measure TotalExpense which is an aggregated measure of Expenses. Like in the previous examples, be sure to assign the measure to the Text object then double click to open the editor and use your cursor to add the static text.

The only applied filters for this aggregated measure are the selected year and region, therefore this Sum _ByGroup_ will return the Total Expenses for that Year and Region.

Table Modified Time

The last capability of dynamic text available in the Text object is the Table Modified Time.

The out of the box display uses the fully qualified datetime stamp and cannot be altered to a different format. To edit, double click inside the Text object and the editor will open. Then click on the Table Modified Time button. Next, use your cursor to position where you would like to add static text. In this case, I added the qualifier Data last updated:.

Conclusion

There are two main takeaways from this blog post. First is that you can easily build dynamic customizable titles, emphasize measures or parameter values.

Second, look to use the Text object for your dynamic text needs.

Here is a quick mapping as a review of what was detailed in the steps above.

 

Using Dynamic Text in a SAS Visual Analytics Report was published on SAS Users.

4月 272018
 

Analyzing ticket sales and customer data for large sports and entertainment events is a complex endeavor. But SAS Visual Analytics makes it easy, with location analytics, customer segmentation, predictive artificial intelligence (AI) capabilities – and more. This blog post covers a brief overview of these features by using a fictitious event company [...]

Analyze ticket sales using location analytics and customer segmentation in SAS Visual Analytics was published on SAS Voices by Falko Schulz

4月 192018
 

In SAS Visual Analytics 7.4 on 9.4M5 and SAS Visual Analytics 8.2 on SAS Viya, the periodic operators have a new additional parameter that controls how filtering on the date data item used in the calculation affects the calculated values.

The new parameter values are:

SAS Visual Analytics filters

These parameter values enable you to improve the appearance of reports based on calculations that use periodic operators. You can have periods that produce missing values for periodic calculations removed from the report, but still available for use in the calculations for later periods. These parameter settings also enable you to provide users with a prompt for choosing the data to display in a report, without having any effect on the calculations themselves.

The following will illustrate the points above, using periodic Revenue calculations based on monthly data from the MEGA_CORP table. New aggregated measures representing Previous Month Revenue (RelativePeriod) and Same Month Last Year (ParallelPeriod) will be displayed as measures in a crosstab. The default _ApplyAllFilters_ is in effect for both, as shown below, but there are no current filters on report or objects.

The Change from Previous Month and Change From Same Month Last Year calculations, respectively, are below:

The resulting report is a crosstab with Date by Month and Product Line in the Row roles, and Revenue, along with the 4 aggregations, in the Column roles.  All calculations are accurate, but of course, the calculations result in missing values for the first month (Jan2009) and for the first year (2009).

An improvement to the appearance of the report might be to only show Date by Month values beginning with Jan2010, where there are no non-missing values.  Why not apply a filter to the crosstab (shown below), so that the interval shown is Jan2010 to the most recent date?

With the above filter applied to the crosstab, the result is shown below—same problem, different year!

This is where the new parameter on our periodic operators is useful. We would like to have all months used in the calculations, but only the months with non-missing values for both of the periodic calculations shown in the crosstab. So, edit both periodic calculations to change the default _ApplyAllFilters_ to _IgnoreAllTimeFrameFilters_, so that the filters will filter the data in the crosstab, but not for the calculations. When the report is refreshed, only the months with non-missing values are shown:

This periodic operator parameter is also useful if you want to enable users to select a specific month, for viewing only a subset of the crosstab results.

For a selection prompt, add a Drop-Down list to select a MONYY value and define a filter action from the Drop-Down list to the Crosstab. To prevent selection of a month value with missing calculation values, you will also want to apply a filter to the Drop-Down list as you did for the crosstab, displaying months Jan2010 and after in the list.

Now the user can select a month, with all calculations relative to that month displayed, shown in the examples below:

Note that, at this point, since you’ve added the action from the drop-down list to the crosstab, you actually no longer need the filter on the crosstab itself.  In addition, if you remove the crosstab filter, then all of your filters will now be from prompts or actions, so you could use the _IgnoreInteractiveTimeFrameFilters_ parameter on your periodic calculations instead of the _IgnoreTimeFrameFilters_ parameter.

You will also notice that, in release 8.2 of SAS Visual Analytics that the performance of the periodic calculations has been greatly improved, with more of the work done in CAS.

Be sure to check out all of the periodic operators, documented here for SAS Visual Analytics 7.4 and SAS Visual Analytics filters on periodic calculations: Apply them or ignore them! was published on SAS Users.

3月 132018
 

SAS Visual Analytics 8.2 introduces the Hidden Data Role. This role can accept one or more category or date data items which will be included in the query results but will not be displayed with the object. You can use this Hidden Data Role in:

  • Mapping Data Sources.
  • Color-Mapped Display Rules.
  • External Links.

Note that this Hidden Data Role is not available for all Objects and cannot be used as both a Hidden Data Role and Data tip value, it can only be assigned to one role.

In this example, we will look at how to use the Hidden Data Role for an External Link.

Here are a few applications of this example:

  • You want to show an index of available assets, and you have a URL to point directly to that asset.
  • Your company sells products, you want to show a table summary of product profit but have a URL that points to each Product’s development page.
  • As the travel department, you want to see individual travel reports rolled up to owner, but have a URL that can link out to each individual report.

The applications are endless when applied to our customer needs.

In my blog example, I have NFL data for Super Bowl wins. I have attached two columns of URLs for demonstration purposes:

  • One URL is for each Super Bowl event, so I have 52 URLs, one for each row of data.
  • The second URL is for each winning team. There have been 20 unique Super Bowl winning teams, so I have 20 unique URLs.

Hidden Data Role in SAS Visual Analytics

In previous versions of SAS Visual Analytics, if you wanted to link out to one of these URLs, you would have to include it in the visualization like in the List Table shown above. But now, using SAS Visual Analytics 8.2, you can assign a column containing these URLs to the Hidden Data Role and it will be available as an External URL.

Here is our target report. We want to be able to link to the Winning Team’s website.

In Visual Analytics 8.2, for the List Table, assign the Winning Team URL column to the Hidden Data Role.

Then, for the List Table, create a new URL Link Action. Give the Action a name and leave the URL section blank. This is because my data column contains a fully qualified URL. If you were linking to a destination and only needed to append a name value pair, then you could put in the partial URL and pass the parameter value, but that’s a different example.

That is using the column which has 20 URLs that matches the winning team in the Hidden Data Role. Now, what if we use the column that has the 52 URLs that link out to the individual Super Bowl events?

That’s right, the cardinality of the Hidden Data Role item does impact the object. Even though the Hidden data item is not visible on the Object, remember it is included in the results query; and therefore, the cardinality of the Hidden data item impacts the aggregation of the data.

Notice that some objects will just present an information warning that a duplicate classification of the data has caused a conflict.

In conclusion, the Hidden Data Role is an exciting addition to the SAS Visual Analytics 8.2 release. I know you'll enjoy and benefit from it.

The power behind a Hidden Data Role in SAS Visual Analytics was published on SAS Users.