communication skills

6月 282019
 

Congratulations on being chosen to speak at an event! Let the anxiety preparation begin. But wait.

Did you know that social media can help you out? Yes, even now, while you plan. What's more, it can be instrumental in maximizing your entire presenter experience before, during and after your presentation. Here are some ideas to get you thinking.

Before

1. Solicit ideas online.

Most of your connections won't attend your event, but many are probably interested in your topic. Don't hesitate to get help from your network while you work on your paper or presentation. Ask them questions. Get their feedback. (And use the event hashtag -- say, #sasgf or #sasusers for example -- when you do it.)

2. Use social media for research.

Online properties like Quora, SAS Communities, Medium, SlideShare and even LinkedIn can lead to statistics, influencers or research you never knew existed. Type keywords or phrases in the basic search field on any of these websites. You never know what (or who) you might find.

3. Polish your LinkedIn (and/or Twitter) profile. (People will be looking.)

Need a checklist? Start with the Example SAS User LinkedIn Profile on communities.sas.com or Buffer's 7 Key Ingredients of a Great Twitter Bio.

4. Schedule a handful of posts.

One week before the conference or perhaps while you're en route, schedule a few posts to your social media accounts. You'll be too busy at the conference to do this. Free tools like Buffer or Hootsuite allow you to schedule posts throughout the week.

During

5. Skim activity around the event hashtag feed to like, reply, share or comment.

Don't know how? Enter the event hashtag, for instance "#sasgf" (no quotation marks), in the main search fields on Twitter and LinkedIn. Doing this is good for a few reasons:

  • It's easy. Especially since you'll be so busy during the event.
  • People (even strangers) appreciate when you interact with their event posts.
  • Social activity during an event is a sure-fire way to gain followers.

6. Post the occasional photo or a useful tip from a particularly inspirational session.

You'll be so busy during the event, it will be hard to find time to post. If you can, do it in small pieces. A favorite stat. A meaningful quote. A beautiful view of the venue. (Remember, use the event hashtag or other topic-specific hashtags when you do.)

After

7. Connect on LinkedIn or SAS Communities.

Immediately after the event (ideally, in less than 24 hours), connect with fellow conference goers on LinkedIn. Be sure to personalize your invitation with a brief note in case they forgot your name. Don't want to wait? Connect with them in person using the LinkedIn QR code trick.

Is your new friend fairly technical? If so, find and follow his or her activity on communities.sas.com (See subhead "How do I search for people?").

8. Add your paper or presentation to your LinkedIn profile (and direct people to it).

There are three sections of your profile where you can add media (in the form of hyperlinks, documents, PowerPoint slides, etc.): your Summary, Experience and Education sections. Professionals: Add your paper or presentation slides to your Summary or Experience sections; students: consider your Education section.

Pro tip: For additional profile views, create a post to point connections to it on your profile or mention it during your presentation.

 

 

 

 

 

9. Write a useful blog post.

Alison Bolen wrote about this in 2012, yet her message remains perfectly relevant: How to transform your live event blogging into evergreen content. The bottom line? Readers care about the content, not the conference.

Nine #SocialMedia Speaker Tips to Use Before, During and After Events was published on SAS Users.

6月 282019
 

Congratulations on being chosen to speak at an event! Let the anxiety preparation begin. But wait.

Did you know that social media can help you out? Yes, even now, while you plan. What's more, it can be instrumental in maximizing your entire presenter experience before, during and after your presentation. Here are some ideas to get you thinking.

Before

1. Solicit ideas online.

Most of your connections won't attend your event, but many are probably interested in your topic. Don't hesitate to get help from your network while you work on your paper or presentation. Ask them questions. Get their feedback. (And use the event hashtag -- say, #sasgf or #sasusers for example -- when you do it.)

2. Use social media for research.

Online properties like Quora, SAS Communities, Medium, SlideShare and even LinkedIn can lead to statistics, influencers or research you never knew existed. Type keywords or phrases in the basic search field on any of these websites. You never know what (or who) you might find.

3. Polish your LinkedIn (and/or Twitter) profile. (People will be looking.)

Need a checklist? Start with the Example SAS User LinkedIn Profile on communities.sas.com or Buffer's 7 Key Ingredients of a Great Twitter Bio.

4. Schedule a handful of posts.

One week before the conference or perhaps while you're en route, schedule a few posts to your social media accounts. You'll be too busy at the conference to do this. Free tools like Buffer or Hootsuite allow you to schedule posts throughout the week.

During

5. Skim activity around the event hashtag feed to like, reply, share or comment.

Don't know how? Enter the event hashtag, for instance "#sasgf" (no quotation marks), in the main search fields on Twitter and LinkedIn. Doing this is good for a few reasons:

  • It's easy. Especially since you'll be so busy during the event.
  • People (even strangers) appreciate when you interact with their event posts.
  • Social activity during an event is a sure-fire way to gain followers.

6. Post the occasional photo or a useful tip from a particularly inspirational session.

You'll be so busy during the event, it will be hard to find time to post. If you can, do it in small pieces. A favorite stat. A meaningful quote. A beautiful view of the venue. (Remember, use the event hashtag or other topic-specific hashtags when you do.)

After

7. Connect on LinkedIn or SAS Communities.

Immediately after the event (ideally, in less than 24 hours), connect with fellow conference goers on LinkedIn. Be sure to personalize your invitation with a brief note in case they forgot your name. Don't want to wait? Connect with them in person using the LinkedIn QR code trick.

Is your new friend fairly technical? If so, find and follow his or her activity on communities.sas.com (See subhead "How do I search for people?").

8. Add your paper or presentation to your LinkedIn profile (and direct people to it).

There are three sections of your profile where you can add media (in the form of hyperlinks, documents, PowerPoint slides, etc.): your Summary, Experience and Education sections. Professionals: Add your paper or presentation slides to your Summary or Experience sections; students: consider your Education section.

Pro tip: For additional profile views, create a post to point connections to it on your profile or mention it during your presentation.

 

 

 

 

 

9. Write a useful blog post.

Alison Bolen wrote about this in 2012, yet her message remains perfectly relevant: How to transform your live event blogging into evergreen content. The bottom line? Readers care about the content, not the conference.

Nine #SocialMedia Speaker Tips to Use Before, During and After Events was published on SAS Users.

4月 052017
 

Emma Warrillow, President of Data Insight Group, Inc., believes analysts add business value when they ask questions of the business, the data and the approach. “Don’t be an order taker,” she said.

Emma Warrillow at SAS Global Forum.

Warrillow held to her promise that attendees wouldn’t see a stitch of SAS programming code in her session Monday, April 3, at SAS Global Forum.

Not that she doesn’t believe programming skills and SAS Certifications aren’t important. She does.

Why you need communication skills

But Warrillow believes that as technology takes on more of the heavy lifting from the analysis side, communication skills, interpretation skills and storytelling skills are quickly becoming the data analyst’s magic wand.

Warrillow likened it to the centuries-old question: If a tree falls in a forest, and no one is around to hear it, did it make a sound? “If you have a great analysis, but no one gets it or takes action, was it really a great analysis?” she asked.


If you have a great analysis, but no one gets it or takes action, was it really a great analysis?
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To create real business value and be the unicorn – that rare breed of marketing technologist who understands both marketing and marketing technology – analysts have to understand the business and its goals and operations.

She offered several actionable tips to help make the transition, including:

1. Never just send the spreadsheet.

Or the PowerPoint or the email. “The recipient might ignore it, get frustrated or, worse yet, misinterpret it,” she said. “Instead, communicate what you’ve seen in the analysis.”

2. Be a POET.

Warrillow is a huge fan of the work of Laura Warren of Storylytics.ca. who recommends an acronym approach to data-based storytelling and making sure every presentation offers:

  • Purpose: The purpose of this chart is to …
  • Observation: To illustrate that …
  • Explanation: What this means to us is …
  • Take-away or Transition: As a next step, we recommend …

3. Brand your work.

“Many of us suffer from a lack of profile in our organizations,” she said. “Take a lesson from public relations and brand yourselves. Just make sure you’re a brand people can trust. Have checks and balances in place to make sure your data is accurate.”

4. Don’t be an order taker.

Be consultative and remember that you are the expert when it comes to knowing how to structure the campaign modeling. It can be tough in some organizations, Warrillow admitted, but asking some questions and offering suggestions can be a great way to begin.

5. Tell the truth.

“Storytelling can be associated with big, tall tales,” she said. “You have to have stories that are compelling but also have truth and resonance.” One of her best resources is The Four Truths of the Storyteller” by Peter Gruber, which first appeared in Harvard Business Review December 2007.

6. Go higher.

Knowledge and comprehension are important, “but we need to start moving further up the chain,” Warrillow said. She used Bloom’s Taxonomy to describe the importance of making data move at the speed of business – getting people to take action by moving into application, analysis, synthesis and evaluation phases.

7. Prepare for the future.

“Don’t become the person who says, ‘I’m this kind of analyst,’” she said. “We need to explore new environments, prepare ourselves with great skills. In the short term, we’re going to need more programming skills. Over time, however, we’re going to need interpretation, communication and storytelling skills.” She encouraged attendees to answer the SAS Global Forum challenge of becoming a #LifeLearner.

For more from Warrillow, read the post, Making data personal: big data made small.

7 tips for becoming a data science unicorn was published on SAS Users.