conferences

4月 252016
 

Last week I attended SAS Global Forum 2016 in Las Vegas. I and more than 5,000 other attendees discussed and shared tips about data analysis and statistics.

Naturally, I attended many presentations that featured using SAS/IML software to implement advanced analytical algorithms. Several speakers showed impressive mastery of SAS/IML programming techniques. In all, almost 30 papers stated that they used SAS/IML for some or all of the computations.


Seven papers in advanced #analytics from SAS Global Forum 2016 #SASGF
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The following presentations were especially impressive. As you can see, topics include Bayesian analysis, signal processing, spatial analysis, simulation, and logistic regression.

  • Jason Bentley, a PhD student at The University of Sydney, presented a paper about Bayesian inference for complex hierarchical models with smoothing splines (joint work with Cathy Lee). Whereas Markov-chain Monte Carlo techniques are "computationally intensive, or even infeasible" for large hierarchical models, Bentley coded a "fast deterministic alternative to MCMC." His SAS/IML code runs in 22 seconds on a hierarchical model that includes 350 schools and approximately 88,000 students. Jason says that this was his first serious SAS/IML program, but that he found the language "ideal" for implementing the algorithm.
  • Woranat Wongdhamma at Oklahoma State University used wavelet analysis in SAS/IML to construct a predictive model that helps clinical researchers diagnose obstructive sleep apnea. I did not realize that 1 in 15 adult Americans have moderate or severe sleep apnea, and many of these people are undiagnosed. Hopefully Wongdhamma's analysis will help expedite the diagnosis process.
  • dasilva Alan Ricardo da Silva, a professor at the University of Brasilia, has written many papers that feature SAS/IML programs. This year (with T. Rodrigues), Alan showed how to implement an algorithm for geographically weighted negative binomial regression. He applied this spatial analysis method to freight transportation in Brazil. The image at right is taken from his paper.
  • A second paper by da Silva (with co-author Paulo da Silva) shows how to use SAS/IML to simulate data from a skew normal and a skew t distribution.
  • Gongwei Chen used SAS/IML to build a discrete-time Markov chain model to forecast workloads at the Washington State Department of Corrections. Social workers and payroll officers supervise convicted offenders who have been released from prison or were sentenced to supervision by the court system. Individuals who exhibit good behavior can transition from a highly supervised situation into less supervision. Other individuals might commit a new offense that requires an increase in supervision. Chen's probabilistic model helps the State of Washington forecast the resources needed for supervising offenders.
  • Katherine Cai and Jeffrey Wilson at Arizona State University used SAS/IML to build a logistic model of longitudinal data with time-dependent covariates. The algorithm was applied to obesity data and to children’s health data in the Philippines.
  • Another paper by Wilson (co-authored with Kyle Irimata) used SAS/IML to implement exact logistic regression for nested binary data.

The SAS/IML language was used in many other e-posters and presentations that unfortunately I could not attend due to other commitments. All of the papers for the proceedings are available online, so you can search the proceedings for "IML" or any other topic interests you.

Experienced SAS programmers recognize that when an analysis is not available in any SAS procedure, the SAS/IML language is often the best choice for implementing the analysis. These papers and my discussions with SAS customers indicate that the SAS/IML language is actively used for advanced analytical models that require simulation, optimization, and matrix computations. Because SAS/IML is part of the free SAS University Edition, which has been downloaded 500,000 times, I expect the number of SAS/IML users to continue to grow.

tags: Conferences, Matrix Computations

The post Matrix computations at SAS Global Forum 2016 appeared first on The DO Loop.

1月 272016
 

Students, it’s time to put your Analytical skills to the test. Registration for the 2016 Analytics Shootout competition is now open!  This competition will allow you to use your Analytical skills to solve a hypothetical, but common, real-world business problem.  Gather your fellow students, create a team, and register today!  […]

The post Registration for the 2016 Analytics Shootout is OPEN! appeared first on Generation SAS.

9月 032015
 

SAS Regional Users Groups (RUGS) are committed to the next generation of SAS users. To encourage hands-on learning, each RUG awards scholarships to students, faculty and new SAS professionals. These awards include full or partial scholarships to attend these valuable events where they learn about SAS software from experienced programmers. Could you or […]

The post WUSS and SESUG Scholarships Winners appeared first on Generation SAS.

8月 282015
 

In a little more than two weeks, I will be in one of my favorite places, San Diego, California, recruiting potential SAS Press authors at the JMP Discovery Summit, which will be held at the beautiful Paradise Point Resort and Spa from 14 September to 17 September 2015. I’m especially […]

The post SAS Press is heading to JMP Discovery Summit appeared first on The SAS Bookshelf.

7月 242015
 

This year, to celebrate the 25th anniversary of SAS Press, we are offering a 25% discount on all our SAS Press books at JSM (Joint Statistical Meetings). Over the last 25 years, SAS Press has published 250 books; has worked with more than 300 SAS authors and has millions of satisfied […]

The post 25 years – 25% discount at JSM, Seattle! appeared first on The SAS Bookshelf.

7月 222015
 

The Analytics 2015 Conference is now accepting abstracts for the Poster Competition. This is a fantastic opportunity for you to showcase your talent and have your work recognized by nearly 1,000 analytics professionals. This competition is open to any full-time student from an accredited post-secondary academic institution. The top six […]

The post Calling all students! Win a FREE trip to the Analytics 2015 Conference! appeared first on Generation SAS.

6月 102015
 

Bill Benjamin’s bestseller, Exchanging Data between SAS and Microsoft Excel: Tips and Techniques to Transfer and Manage Data More Efficiently, was pipped at the post as he narrowly missed the top spot to Implementing CDISC Using SAS: An End-to-End Guide, at last month’s PharmaSUG 2015 meeting in Orlando -- by one […]

The post Narrow miss at PharmaSUG 2015 for bestseller appeared first on The SAS Bookshelf.

5月 162015
 

Many of our authors often ask us where they can find real data that they can use without copyright or other confidentiality issues. Instructors too are always on the look-out for real-life data. Well, thanks to a new initiative supported by SAS, you can now access data from more than […]

The post Get real clinical data appeared first on The SAS Bookshelf.

5月 062015
 

Last week I attended SAS Global Forum 2015 in Dallas. It was packed with almost 5,000 attendees. I learned many interesting things at the conference, including the fact that you need to arrive EARLY to the statistical presentations if you want to find an empty seat!

It was gratifying to see that matrix programming with SAS/IML software is alive and well in the SAS statistical community. I was impressed with the number and quality of presentations that featured SAS/IML programs. I attended the following talks or e-posters:

Of course, SAS/IML was included in my presentation Ten Tips for Simulating Data with SAS, which was very well attended. The SAS/IML language was also used in several e-posters and presentations that unfortunately I could not attend due to other commitments. All of the papers for the proceedings are available online, so you can search the proceedings for "IML" or whatever other topic interests you.

It was energizing to listen to and talk with dozens of SAS customers. The conference demonstrated that the SAS/IML language is actively used for optimization, integration, simulation, and matrix computations, which are topics that I blog about frequently. I discussed SAS/IML or general statistical topics with dozens of customers during meals, at coffee breaks, in the hallways, and in The Quad.

At the Opening Session, I learned that the free SAS University Edition has been downloaded more than 250,000 times in the 11 months that it has been available. Because SAS/IML is part of the SAS University Edition, I expect the number of SAS/IML users to continue to grow. Experienced SAS programmers recognize that when an analysis is not available in any SAS procedure, the SAS/IML language is often the best choice for implementing the algorithm.

tags: Conferences, SAS Global Forum

The post Matrix computations at SAS Global Forum 2015 appeared first on The DO Loop.

4月 062015
 

The 2015 SAS Global Forum is in Dallas, TX, and I'll be there. There are many talks to see and people to meet, so thank goodness for the agenda builder, which enables you to create a schedule in advance.

I always enjoy talking with SAS customers about statistics, simulations, matrix computations, and the SAS/IML product. In fact, my main reason to attend this conference is to talk to customers, so please find me and say hello! Here's my schedule:

Sunday, April 26, 2015

  • At 5:00 p.m. I will give a Super Demo in The Quad (formerly known as the SAS Support and Demo Area). The topic is "Visualizing SAS/IML Programs" and I will show how you can use graphics to find errors, detect inefficiencies, and create high-quality statistical programs in the SAS/IML language.
  • I will be at the SAS/IML booth in The Quad during 4:30 – 6:30 p.m. I am sharing the booth with the SAS Studio folks, so come and see the new browser-based interface to running SAS programs.
  • Find me at the Get-Acquainted Dessert Reception from 8:30 – 9:00 p.m.

Monday, April 27

  • At 10:30 a.m. I give a presentation "Ten Tips for Simulating Data with SAS" in Room C148. This talk features techniques that enable you to write efficient simulations in SAS. The tips are from my book Simulating Data with SAS. Whether you are a beginner or an experienced SAS programmer, I promise that you'll learn something interesting about simulating data with SAS.
  • You will find me at the SAS/IML booth in The Quad during the Customer Appreciation Mixer from 6:30 – 8:00 p.m. Grab a drink and some hors d'oeuvres and talk to me about the statistical and data analysis problems you face at your company.

Tuesday, April 28

  • I'll be at the SAS/IML booth in The Quad from 10:00 a.m. – 12:00 p.m.,
  • At 11:00 a.m. I present a Super Demo titled "Ten Tips for Simulating Data with SAS." If you missed my talk on Monday, come to The Quad to hear an informal presentation about the same topic.
  • Have you ever considered writing a book for SAS Press? Join me and other SAS Press authors for lunch in Ballroom D2 and find out what it takes to write a book. Those who attend will have a chance to win a free book (your choice) from the SAS Bookstore.
  • From 6:30 p.m. – 8:00 p.m., please join me and other SAS professionals for a linkup of online communities, which will include leading members of the SAS online communities, including representatives from SAS-L, sasCommunity.org, the SAS Support Communities, and other online networking sites for SAS professionals.
  • .

During the conference I will occasionally tweet from my Twitter handle @RickWicklin to the hashtag #SASGF15.

So whether you want to discuss statistical programming, comment on a blog topic, or tell me about a cool project that you are working on, please introduce yourself at the conference. I look forward to meeting old friends... and making some new ones.

If you are going to SAS Global Forum 2015, what are you looking forward to? The talks? The social events? Leave a comment about what you hope to gain by attending this conference.

tags: Conferences

The post Let's talk at SAS Global Forum 2015 appeared first on The DO Loop.