customer insights

12月 052016
 

A common practice in traditional marketing is to first choose a target market to focus on. You then align your organization’s strategies and messaging to create a campaign in that target market. But what happens when it becomes clear that the campaign you created isn’t working? How agile are you in terms of adjusting on the fly and adapting to the needs of your prospective customers?

The challenge

A campaign we ran at SAS targeted small to medium-sized businesses, or SMBs. We needed to come up with tailor-made messaging that would be distinct from similar campaigns we were launching targeted at larger, enterprise-level companies. To do that, we highlighted what we thought wedata-analysisre business needs, language and case studies that would resonate with the SMBs.

But after the program launched and began, the results were disappointing. We saw lower-than-expected results for performance metrics including click-through rates and conversions. So we tweaked the messaging, offers and program structure to improve results. After crunching those numbers, the results came in – the campaign was still floundering.

We were now forced to take a fresh look. What had we done wrong? On reflection, we came upon an even more telling question: Did we actually need to separate SMBs from larger organizations? We started with an underlying assumption that the SMB market should be treated differently. Had that been a mistake?

The approach

To help guide us forward, we selected a roster of key performance metrics to analyze:

  • E-mails sent.
  • Open rates.
  • Click-through rates.
  • Opt-out rates.
  • Conversions (those who filled out registration forms to receive the promoted asset).
  • Lead-generated SSOs (an internal measure of conversions that we identify as leads that later progress to become sales opportunities).
  • Rate of completed leads to SSOs.

We then looked at how the SMBs responded to the SMB-specific campaign compared to how they responded when they received the enterprise-level messaging.

The results

To our surprise, SMBs responded more strongly to the enterprise-level campaign (see the table below). Our assumption had been proved wrong. So we adjusted by closing the SMB-specific campaign and retargeted the SMBs with our enterprise-level messaging.

adele-table

The takeaway for us was a reminder that we can’t afford to let our assumptions about the market hinder our ability to adjust to customers’ needs. In this situation, we relied on the power of analytics to provide the answers about what people wanted rather than continue in a losing cause.

You can best meet customers along their decision journey by relying on advanced analytics to increase the quality of a marketing campaign by using scoring, optimization and predictive capabilities. The standard spreadsheet-based reports that marketers used to rely on to see how their campaign performed have now shifted to interactive visualization dashboards to track the efficacy of their campaign, while making changes on the fly when necessary to ensure a campaign is reaching its potential. The biggest difference is that marketers now have these tools at their disposal. We no longer have to submit requests to the IT department to get this information.

==

Editor’s note: This post is part of a series excerpted from Adele Sweetwood’s book, The Analytical Marketer: How to Transform Your Marketing Organization. Each post is a real-world case study of how to improve your customers’ experience and optimize your marketing campaigns.

tags: Campaign Management, customer analytics, customer insights, customer journey, marketing campaigns, midmarket, smb

How analytics empowers campaign agility was published on Customer Intelligence.

12月 052016
 

A common practice in traditional marketing is to first choose a target market to focus on. You then align your organization’s strategies and messaging to create a campaign in that target market. But what happens when it becomes clear that the campaign you created isn’t working? How agile are you in terms of adjusting on the fly and adapting to the needs of your prospective customers?

The challenge

A campaign we ran at SAS targeted small to medium-sized businesses, or SMBs. We needed to come up with tailor-made messaging that would be distinct from similar campaigns we were launching targeted at larger, enterprise-level companies. To do that, we highlighted what we thought wedata-analysisre business needs, language and case studies that would resonate with the SMBs.

But after the program launched and began, the results were disappointing. We saw lower-than-expected results for performance metrics including click-through rates and conversions. So we tweaked the messaging, offers and program structure to improve results. After crunching those numbers, the results came in – the campaign was still floundering.

We were now forced to take a fresh look. What had we done wrong? On reflection, we came upon an even more telling question: Did we actually need to separate SMBs from larger organizations? We started with an underlying assumption that the SMB market should be treated differently. Had that been a mistake?

The approach

To help guide us forward, we selected a roster of key performance metrics to analyze:

  • E-mails sent.
  • Open rates.
  • Click-through rates.
  • Opt-out rates.
  • Conversions (those who filled out registration forms to receive the promoted asset).
  • Lead-generated SSOs (an internal measure of conversions that we identify as leads that later progress to become sales opportunities).
  • Rate of completed leads to SSOs.

We then looked at how the SMBs responded to the SMB-specific campaign compared to how they responded when they received the enterprise-level messaging.

The results

To our surprise, SMBs responded more strongly to the enterprise-level campaign (see the table below). Our assumption had been proved wrong. So we adjusted by closing the SMB-specific campaign and retargeted the SMBs with our enterprise-level messaging.

adele-table

The takeaway for us was a reminder that we can’t afford to let our assumptions about the market hinder our ability to adjust to customers’ needs. In this situation, we relied on the power of analytics to provide the answers about what people wanted rather than continue in a losing cause.

You can best meet customers along their decision journey by relying on advanced analytics to increase the quality of a marketing campaign by using scoring, optimization and predictive capabilities. The standard spreadsheet-based reports that marketers used to rely on to see how their campaign performed have now shifted to interactive visualization dashboards to track the efficacy of their campaign, while making changes on the fly when necessary to ensure a campaign is reaching its potential. The biggest difference is that marketers now have these tools at their disposal. We no longer have to submit requests to the IT department to get this information.

==

Editor’s note: This post is part of a series excerpted from Adele Sweetwood’s book, The Analytical Marketer: How to Transform Your Marketing Organization. Each post is a real-world case study of how to improve your customers’ experience and optimize your marketing campaigns.

tags: Campaign Management, customer analytics, customer insights, customer journey, marketing campaigns, midmarket, smb

How analytics empowers campaign agility was published on Customer Intelligence.

12月 052016
 

A common practice in traditional marketing is to first choose a target market to focus on. You then align your organization’s strategies and messaging to create a campaign in that target market. But what happens when it becomes clear that the campaign you created isn’t working? How agile are you in terms of adjusting on the fly and adapting to the needs of your prospective customers?

The challenge

A campaign we ran at SAS targeted small to medium-sized businesses, or SMBs. We needed to come up with tailor-made messaging that would be distinct from similar campaigns we were launching targeted at larger, enterprise-level companies. To do that, we highlighted what we thought wedata-analysisre business needs, language and case studies that would resonate with the SMBs.

But after the program launched and began, the results were disappointing. We saw lower-than-expected results for performance metrics including click-through rates and conversions. So we tweaked the messaging, offers and program structure to improve results. After crunching those numbers, the results came in – the campaign was still floundering.

We were now forced to take a fresh look. What had we done wrong? On reflection, we came upon an even more telling question: Did we actually need to separate SMBs from larger organizations? We started with an underlying assumption that the SMB market should be treated differently. Had that been a mistake?

The approach

To help guide us forward, we selected a roster of key performance metrics to analyze:

  • E-mails sent.
  • Open rates.
  • Click-through rates.
  • Opt-out rates.
  • Conversions (those who filled out registration forms to receive the promoted asset).
  • Lead-generated SSOs (an internal measure of conversions that we identify as leads that later progress to become sales opportunities).
  • Rate of completed leads to SSOs.

We then looked at how the SMBs responded to the SMB-specific campaign compared to how they responded when they received the enterprise-level messaging.

The results

To our surprise, SMBs responded more strongly to the enterprise-level campaign (see the table below). Our assumption had been proved wrong. So we adjusted by closing the SMB-specific campaign and retargeted the SMBs with our enterprise-level messaging.

adele-table

The takeaway for us was a reminder that we can’t afford to let our assumptions about the market hinder our ability to adjust to customers’ needs. In this situation, we relied on the power of analytics to provide the answers about what people wanted rather than continue in a losing cause.

You can best meet customers along their decision journey by relying on advanced analytics to increase the quality of a marketing campaign by using scoring, optimization and predictive capabilities. The standard spreadsheet-based reports that marketers used to rely on to see how their campaign performed have now shifted to interactive visualization dashboards to track the efficacy of their campaign, while making changes on the fly when necessary to ensure a campaign is reaching its potential. The biggest difference is that marketers now have these tools at their disposal. We no longer have to submit requests to the IT department to get this information.

==

Editor’s note: This post is part of a series excerpted from Adele Sweetwood’s book, The Analytical Marketer: How to Transform Your Marketing Organization. Each post is a real-world case study of how to improve your customers’ experience and optimize your marketing campaigns.

tags: Campaign Management, customer analytics, customer insights, customer journey, marketing campaigns, midmarket, smb

How analytics empowers campaign agility was published on Customer Intelligence.

6月 232016
 

When it comes to strong brand equity, everyone in the organization has to have a seat at the table. Brand equity is the result of positive interactions and transactions between the consumer and brand – across all touchpoints and all communication channels. It is built over time by brands being loyal to customers by providing them with the products, services, and interactions that they expect and value.

However, building brand equity is increasingly complicated by the number of touchpoints a brand has with consumers. As consumers, we have all experienced the frustration of being over-communicated to. Our mailboxes and inboxes are flooded, sometimes with conflicting messages. Or we continuously see marketing communications for things we already purchased or do not want. And even though we may be good customers of a brand, sometimes one channel does not recognize us or treat us as a loyal customer.

All of this is due to a breakdown in sharing of data, customer insights, and marketing plans across the enterprise.   The customer experience is not optimized and this negatively affects brand equity.

Brand equity is important to an organization because it means consumers trust and believe in the value of your brand over other Brand Equity bannerbrands.  Brands with strong brand equity have more pricing power. They are top of mind, and are the brands that customers go to first. And they are brands that consumers are willing and happy to receive communications from, resulting in higher response rates to marketing communications. Strong brand equity increases customer retention, marketing ROI, market share, profits, and shareholder value.

And that is why leading companies invest in improvements in customer experience. An organization that desires to increase brand equity, focuses on customer experience and will leverage all available data and analytics, across the enterprise, to create positive customer perception of their brand.

Forbes survey reveals approaches for building a better brand experience

The Forbes Insights, just published a report based on findings of a survey of business leaders.  In that report they state:

“Business leaders grasp the importance of enterprise-level data analytics for supporting brand and customer-focused initiatives.” It goes on to state:  “Data-driven CX (Customer Experience) is key for surpassing the competition in today’s hyper-competitive global economy. It takes a combination of factors…to deliver highly interactive, consistent, and contextual customer experiences which are critical for supporting the brand.  To achieve this, however, there needs to be greater alignment of people, processes and technology across enterprises—involving not only sales and marketing teams, but also other key players behind customer experience, including information technology, purchasing and production.”   SAS Marketing Operations Management

Today’s rapidly shifting consumers, competition and employee turnover make it even more important to have systems and processes in place to manage across the enterprise. Support for the customer experience need to be embedded across the organization, needs to go beyond one-time initiatives, and needs to be integrated with customer interaction channels.

In support of that, , see SAS Marketing Operations Management that provides the ability to plan, manage and visualize programs across your organization, as well as the new SAS Customer Intelligence 360 platform, which gives you the ability to put those plans into action and engage with customers.

Look for part 2 of this post where I discuss my own experience when brand equity suffered because of a fractured customer experience and how SAS can help you avoid this mistake.

tags: brand, brand equity, customer experience, customer insights, SAS Customer Intelligence 360, SAS Marketing Operations Management

Brand equity is built on customer experience was published on Customer Intelligence.

6月 232016
 

When it comes to strong brand equity, everyone in the organization has to have a seat at the table. Brand equity is the result of positive interactions and transactions between the consumer and brand – across all touchpoints and all communication channels. It is built over time by brands being loyal to customers by providing them with the products, services, and interactions that they expect and value.

However, building brand equity is increasingly complicated by the number of touchpoints a brand has with consumers. As consumers, we have all experienced the frustration of being over-communicated to. Our mailboxes and inboxes are flooded, sometimes with conflicting messages. Or we continuously see marketing communications for things we already purchased or do not want. And even though we may be good customers of a brand, sometimes one channel does not recognize us or treat us as a loyal customer.

All of this is due to a breakdown in sharing of data, customer insights, and marketing plans across the enterprise.   The customer experience is not optimized and this negatively affects brand equity.

Brand equity is important to an organization because it means consumers trust and believe in the value of your brand over other Brand Equity bannerbrands.  Brands with strong brand equity have more pricing power. They are top of mind, and are the brands that customers go to first. And they are brands that consumers are willing and happy to receive communications from, resulting in higher response rates to marketing communications. Strong brand equity increases customer retention, marketing ROI, market share, profits, and shareholder value.

And that is why leading companies invest in improvements in customer experience. An organization that desires to increase brand equity, focuses on customer experience and will leverage all available data and analytics, across the enterprise, to create positive customer perception of their brand.

Forbes survey reveals approaches for building a better brand experience

The Forbes Insights, just published a report based on findings of a survey of business leaders.  In that report they state:

“Business leaders grasp the importance of enterprise-level data analytics for supporting brand and customer-focused initiatives.” It goes on to state:  “Data-driven CX (Customer Experience) is key for surpassing the competition in today’s hyper-competitive global economy. It takes a combination of factors…to deliver highly interactive, consistent, and contextual customer experiences which are critical for supporting the brand.  To achieve this, however, there needs to be greater alignment of people, processes and technology across enterprises—involving not only sales and marketing teams, but also other key players behind customer experience, including information technology, purchasing and production.”   SAS Marketing Operations Management

Today’s rapidly shifting consumers, competition and employee turnover make it even more important to have systems and processes in place to manage across the enterprise. Support for the customer experience need to be embedded across the organization, needs to go beyond one-time initiatives, and needs to be integrated with customer interaction channels.

In support of that, , see SAS Marketing Operations Management that provides the ability to plan, manage and visualize programs across your organization, as well as the new SAS Customer Intelligence 360 platform, which gives you the ability to put those plans into action and engage with customers.

Look for part 2 of this post where I discuss my own experience when brand equity suffered because of a fractured customer experience and how SAS can help you avoid this mistake.

tags: brand, brand equity, customer experience, customer insights, SAS Customer Intelligence 360, SAS Marketing Operations Management

Brand equity is built on customer experience was published on Customer Intelligence.