data science

8月 112017
 

How can you tell if your marketing is working? How can you determine the cost and return of your campaigns? How can you decide what to do next? An effective way to answer these questions is to monitor a set of key performance indicators, or KPIs.

KPIs are the basic statistics that give you a clear idea of how your website (or app) is performing. KPIs vary by predetermined business objectives, and measure progress towards those specific objectives. In the famous words of Avinash Kaushik, KPIs should be:

  • Uncomplex.
  • Relevant.
  • Timely.
  • Instantly useful.

An example that fits this description, with applicability to profit, nonprofit, and e-commerce business models, would be the almighty conversion rate.  In digital analytics this metric is interpreted as the proportion of visitors to a website or app who take action to go beyond a casual content view or site visit, as a result of subtle or direct requests from marketers, advertisers, and content creators.

{\mathrm {Conversion\ rate}}={\frac {{\mathrm {Number\ of\ Goal\ Achievements}}}{{\mathrm {Visitors}}}}

Although successful conversions can be defined differently based on your use case, it is easy to see why this KPI is uncomplex, relevant, timely, and useful. We can even splinter this metric into two types:

Macro conversion – Someone completes an action that is important to your business (like making you some money).

Micro conversion – An indicator that a visitor is moving towards a macro conversion (like progressing through a multi-step sales funnel to eventually make you some money)

Regardless of the conversion type, I have always found that reporting on this KPI is a popular request for analysts from middle management and executives. However, it isn't difficult to anticipate what is coming next from the most important person in your business world:

"How can we improve our conversion rate going forward?"

You can report, slice, dice, and segment away in your web analytics platform, but needles in haystacks are not easily discovered unless we adapt. I know change can be difficult, but allow me to make the case for machine learning and hyperparameters within the discipline of digital analytics. A trendy subject for some, a scary subject for others, but my intent is to lend a practitioner's viewpoint. Analytical decision trees are an excellent way to begin because of their frequent usage within marketing applications, primarily due to their approachability, and ease of interpretation.

Whether your use case is for supervised segmentation, or propensity scoring, this form of predictive analytics can be labeled as machine learning due to algorithm's approach to analyzing data. Have you ever researched how trees actually learn before arriving to a final result? It's beautiful math. However, it doesn't end there. We are living in a moment where more sophisticated machine learning algorithms have emerged that can comparatively increase predictive accuracy, precision, and most importantly – marketing-centric KPIs, while being just as easy to construct.

Using the same data inputs across different analysis types like Forests, Gradient Boosting, and Neural Networks, analysts can compare model fit statistics to determine which approach will have the most meaningful impact on your organization's objectives. Terms like cumulative lift or misclassification may not mean much to you, but they are the keys to selecting the math that best answers how conversion rate can be improved by transparently disclosing accurate views of variable importance.

So is that it? I can just drag and drop my way through the world of visual analytics to optimize against KPIs. Well, there is a tradeoff to discuss here. For some organizations, simply using a machine learning algorithm enabled by an easy-to-use software interface will help improve conversion rate tactics on a mobile app screen experience as compared to not using an analytic method. But an algorithm cannot be expected to perform well as a one size fits all approach for every type of business problem. It is a reasonable question to ask oneself if opportunity is being left on the table to motivate analysts to refine the math to the use case. Learning to improve how an algorithm arrives at a final result should not be scary because it can get a little technical. It's actually quite the opposite, and I love learning how machine learning can be elegant. This is why I want to talk about hyperparameters!

Anyone who has ever built a predictive model understands the iterative nature of adjusting various property settings of an algorithm in an effort to optimize the analysis results. As we endlessly try to improve the predictive accuracy, the process becomes painfully repetitive and manual. Due to the typical length of time an analyst can spend on this task alone - from hours, days, or longer - the approach defies our ability as humans to practically arrive at an optimized final solution. Sometimes referred to as auto tuning, hyperparameters address this issue by exploring different combinations of algorithm options, training a model for each option in an effort to find the best model. Imagine running 1000s of iterations of a website conversion propensity model across different property threshold ranges in a single execution. As a result, these models can improve significantly across important fit statistics that relate directly to your KPIs.

At the end of running an analysis with hyperparameters, the best recipe will be identified. Just like any other modeling project, the ability to action off of the insight is no different, from traditional model score code to next-best-action recommendations infused into your mobile app's personalization technology. That's genuinely exciting, courtesy of recent innovations in distributed analytical engines with feature-rich building blocks for machine-learning activities.

If the subject of hyperparameters is new to you, I encourage you to watch this short video.

This will be one of the main themes of my presentations at Analytics Experience 2017 in Washington DC. Using digital data collected by SAS Customer Intelligence 360 and analyzing it with SAS Visual Data Mining & Machine Learning on VIYA, I want to share the excitement I am feeling about digital intelligence and predictive personalization. I hope you'll consider joining the SAS family for an awesome agenda between September 18th-20th in our nation's capital.

Hyperparameters, digital analytics, and key performance indicators was published on Customer Intelligence Blog.

1月 282017
 

Digital intelligence is a trending term in the space of digital marketing analytics that needs to be demystified. Let's begin by defining what a digital marketing analytics platform is:

Digital marketing analytics platforms are technology applications used by customer intelligence ninjas to understand and improve consumer experiences. Prospecting, acquiring, and holding on to digital-savvy customers depends on understanding their multidevice behavior, and derived insight fuels marketing optimization strategies. These platforms come in different flavors, from stand-alone niche offerings, to comprehensive end-to-end vehicles performing functions from data collection through analysis and visualization.

However, not every platform is built equally from an analytical perspective. According to Brian Hopkins, a Forrester analyst, firms that excel at using data and analytics to optimize their digital businesses will together generate $1.2 trillion per annum in revenue by 2020. And digital intelligence — the practice of continuously optimizing customer experiences with online and offline data, advanced analytics and prescriptive insights — supports every insights-driven business. Digital intelligence is the antidote to the weaknesses of analytically immature platforms, leaving the world of siloed reporting behind and maturing towards actionable, predictive marketing. Here are a couple of items to consider:

  • Today's device-crazed consumers flirt with brands across a variety of interactions during a customer life cycle. However, most organizations seem to focus on website activity in one bucket, mobile in another, and social in . . . you see where I'm going. Strategic plans often fall short in applying digital intelligence across all channels — including offline interactions like customer support or product development.
  • Powerful digital intelligence uses timely delivery of prescriptive insights to positively influence customer experiences. This requires integration of data, analytics and the systems that interact with the consumer. Yet many teams manually apply analytics and deliver analysis via endless reports and dashboards that look retroactively at past behavior — begging business leaders to question the true value and potential impact of digital analysis.

As consumer behavioral needs and preferences shifts over time, the proportion of digital to non-digital interactions is growing. With the recent release of Customer Intelligence 360, SAS has carefully considered feedback from our customers (and industry analysts) to create technology that supports a modern digital intelligence strategy in guiding an organization to:

  • Enrich your first-party customer data with user level data from web and mobile channels. It's time to graduate from aggregating data for reporting purposes to the collection and retention of granular, customer-level data. It is individual-level data that drives advanced segmentation and continuous optimization of customer interactions through personalization, targeting and recommendations.
  • Keep up with customers through machine learning, data science and advanced analytics. The increasing pace of digital customer interactions requires analytical maturity to optimize marketing and experiences. By enriching first-party customer data with infusions of web and mobile behavior, and more importantly, in the analysis-ready format for sophisticated analytics, 360 Discover invites analysts to use their favorite analytic tool and tear down the limitations of traditional web analytics.
  • Automate targeting, channel orchestration and personalization. Brands struggle with too few resources to support the manual design and data-driven design of customer experiences. Connecting first-party data that encompasses both offline and online attributes with actionable propensity scores and algorithmically-defined segments through digital channel interactions is the agenda. If that sounds mythical, check out a video example of how SAS brings this to life.

The question now is - are you ready? Learn more here of why we are so excited about enabling digital intelligence for our customers, and how this benefits testing, targeting, and optimization of customer experiences.

 

tags: Customer Engagement, customer intelligence, Customer Intelligence 360, customer journey, data science, Digital Intelligence, machine learning, marketing analytics, personalization, predictive analytics, Predictive Personalization, Prescriptive Analytics

Digital intelligence for optimizing customer engagement was published on Customer Intelligence.

12月 062016
 

As data-driven marketers, you are now challenged by senior leaders to have a laser focus on the customer journey and optimize the path of consumer interactions with your brand. Within that journey there are three trends (or challenges) to focus on:

  • Deeply understanding your target audience to anticipate their needs and desires.
  • Meeting customers’ expectations (although aiming higher can help differentiate your brand from the pack).
  • Addressing their pain points to increase your brand's relevance.

customer journey

No matter who you chat with, or what marketing conference you recently attended, it's safe to say that the intersection of digital marketing, analytics, optimization and personalization is a popular subject of conversation. Let's review the popular buzzwords at the moment:

  • Predictive personalization
  • Data science
  • Machine learning
  • Self-learning algorithms
  • Segment of one
  • Contextual awareness
  • Real time
  • Automation
  • Artificial intelligence

It's quite possible you have encountered these words at such a high frequency, you could make a drinking game out of it.drinking-game

There’s a lot of confusion created by these terms and what they mean. For instance, there is hubbub around so-called ‘easy button’ solutions that marketing cloud companies are selling for customer analytics and data-drive personalization. In reaction to this, I set off on a personal quest to research questions like:

  1. Does every technology perform analytics and personalization equally?
    • What are the benefits and drawbacks to analytic automation?
    • What are the downstream impacts to the predictive recommendations marketers depend on for personalized interactions across channels?
    • Should I be comfortable trusting a black-box algorithm and how it impacts the facilitated experiences my brand delivers to customers and prospects?
  2. Do you need a data scientist to be successful in modern marketing?
    • Is high quality analytic talent extremely difficult to find?
    • How valid is the complaint of a data science talent shortage?
    • How do I balance the needs of my marketing organization with recent analytic technology trends?

Have I captivated your interest? If yes, check out this on-demand webcast.

It's time to dive in deep and unleash on these questions. During the video, I share the results of my investigation into these questions, and reactive viewpoints. In addition, you will be introduced to new SAS Customer Intelligence 360 technology addressing these challenges. I believe in a future where approachable technology and analytically-curious people come together to deliver intelligent customer interactions. Analytically curious people can be data scientists, citizen data scientists, statisticians, marketing analysts, digital marketers, creative super forces and more. Building teams of these individuals armed with modern customer analytics software tools will help you differentiate and compete in today's marketing ecosystem.

marketing ecosystem

 

tags: artificial intelligence, Context-aware, customer intelligence, customer journey, Data Driven Marketing, data science, digital marketing, Digital Personalization, machine learning, marketing analytics, Predictive Personalization, Real time Automation, segment of one, Self-learning algorithms

Customer analytics: Think outside the black box was published on Customer Intelligence.

12月 062016
 

As data-driven marketers, you are now challenged by senior leaders to have a laser focus on the customer journey and optimize the path of consumer interactions with your brand. Within that journey there are three trends (or challenges) to focus on:

  • Deeply understanding your target audience to anticipate their needs and desires.
  • Meeting customers’ expectations (although aiming higher can help differentiate your brand from the pack).
  • Addressing their pain points to increase your brand's relevance.

customer journey

No matter who you chat with, or what marketing conference you recently attended, it's safe to say that the intersection of digital marketing, analytics, optimization and personalization is a popular subject of conversation. Let's review the popular buzzwords at the moment:

  • Predictive personalization
  • Data science
  • Machine learning
  • Self-learning algorithms
  • Segment of one
  • Contextual awareness
  • Real time
  • Automation
  • Artificial intelligence

It's quite possible you have encountered these words at such a high frequency, you could make a drinking game out of it.drinking-game

There’s a lot of confusion created by these terms and what they mean. For instance, there is hubbub around so-called ‘easy button’ solutions that marketing cloud companies are selling for customer analytics and data-drive personalization. In reaction to this, I set off on a personal quest to research questions like:

  1. Does every technology perform analytics and personalization equally?
    • What are the benefits and drawbacks to analytic automation?
    • What are the downstream impacts to the predictive recommendations marketers depend on for personalized interactions across channels?
    • Should I be comfortable trusting a black-box algorithm and how it impacts the facilitated experiences my brand delivers to customers and prospects?
  2. Do you need a data scientist to be successful in modern marketing?
    • Is high quality analytic talent extremely difficult to find?
    • How valid is the complaint of a data science talent shortage?
    • How do I balance the needs of my marketing organization with recent analytic technology trends?

Have I captivated your interest? If yes, check out this on-demand webcast.

It's time to dive in deep and unleash on these questions. During the video, I share the results of my investigation into these questions, and reactive viewpoints. In addition, you will be introduced to new SAS Customer Intelligence 360 technology addressing these challenges. I believe in a future where approachable technology and analytically-curious people come together to deliver intelligent customer interactions. Analytically curious people can be data scientists, citizen data scientists, statisticians, marketing analysts, digital marketers, creative super forces and more. Building teams of these individuals armed with modern customer analytics software tools will help you differentiate and compete in today's marketing ecosystem.

marketing ecosystem

 

tags: artificial intelligence, Context-aware, customer intelligence, customer journey, Data Driven Marketing, data science, digital marketing, Digital Personalization, machine learning, marketing analytics, Predictive Personalization, Real time Automation, segment of one, Self-learning algorithms

Customer analytics: Think outside the black box was published on Customer Intelligence.

11月 282016
 

One aspect of high-quality information is consistency. We often think about consistency in terms of consistent values. A large portion of the effort expended on “data quality dimensions” essentially focuses on data value consistency. For example, when we describe accuracy, what we often mean is consistency with a defined source […]

The post Harmonizing semantics for consistency in interpreting analytical results appeared first on The Data Roundtable.

9月 212016
 

We have just launched a free eBook containing a carefully selected collection of chapters from SAS Press books introducing the field of data science. Data science may be a difficult term to define, but data scientists are definitely in great demand! Wayne Thompson, Senior Product Manager at SAS, defines data […]

The post Free eBook: Discovering data science with SAS appeared first on SAS Learning Post.

8月 272016
 

For the uninitiated, SAS 360 Engage enables organizations to interact with consumers by allowing them to create, manage and deliver digital content over web and mobile channels.  Wait a minute. SAS does more than the analytics? That is correct. SAS 360 Engage is a marketing super force serving as a one-stop shop for data capture all the way through delivering highly-targeted, personalized digital experiences.

360 Engage 1

Being able to dynamically place content and offers into digital channels – across devices and points in time – is nothing new for savvy marketing brands focused on optimization. As customer journeys spread across fragmented touch points while customers are demanding seamless and relevant experiences, content-oriented marketers have been forced to reevaluate their strategies for engagement. But the complexity, pace and volume of modern marketing easily overwhelms traditional planning and design approaches that rely on historical conventions, myopic single-channel perspectives and sequential act-and-learn iteration.

Presently, marketers primarily use a variety of content optimization approaches that include A/B testing and multivariate testing. A/B testing, at its simplest, is a method of website or mobile optimization in which the conversion rates of two versions of a page are compared using visitor response rates. By tracking the way visitors interact with the content– the videos they watch, the buttons they click, or whether they sign up for a newsletter – you can infer which version of the content is most effective.

Due to the popularity of this technique, SAS 360 Engage supports A/B/n testing.  A/B/n testing is an extension of A/B testing, where “N” refers to the number of versions being tested, anywhere from two versions to the “nth” version. For example, when a brand has more than one idea for what the ideal digital experience should be, A/B/n can be used to compare each hypothesis and produce an optimized decision based on data, not subjectivity.

360 Engage 2

Testing is attractive because it is efficient, measurable and serves as a machete cutting through the noise and assumptions associated with delivering effective experiences. In parallel, the evolving marketing landscape is driving a greater mandate for testing: to operate in more channels, handle more data and support more users. Testing must mature beyond traditional on-site experimentation to fully optimize a multifaceted customer journey.

360 Engage 3

The majority of today’s technologies for personalization have generally failed to effectively use data science to offer consumers a contextualized digital experience. Many of today’s offerings are based on simple rules-based segmentation to drive recommendations. Building off the benefits of multi-channel A/B/n testing, this is where SAS 360 Engage injects its analytical muscle to differentiate from other personalization technologies.  Let's break this down:

  • At the conclusion of an A/B/n test, there is usually a winner and one or more losers.
  • Is there really one superior experience for your entire marketable audience? Is it possible that experiences should vary by segment?

Performing algorithmic segmentation sounds awesome, but who really has the time to do it? We have so many tests to run.360 Engage 4

360 Engage 5

360 Engage 6

The time has arrived for predictive marketing to have its moment in the sun, and with Forrester recently naming SAS the leader in customer analytics, it's official - the 800-pound gorilla in advanced analytics is locked in on solving complex issues facing the space of data-driven marketing. Making digital personalization more relevant for target audiences is just like preparing a delicious meal; it all comes down to the ingredients and preparation process to rise to the occasion!

A beautiful and interpretable visualization is generated highlighting what is unique about this segment, as compared to everyone else who was exposed to the test. If the brand wants to target this audience in future campaigns, a single click populates this segment in the platform for future journey orchestration.

If you look closely at the image, you will note in the upper half of the report that the winner of the A/B/n test is variant A. However, the lower half of the report showcases a newly discovered segment. It turns out that when a specific customer segment with recent purchase, stay and amenity activity interacts with this hospitality brand, variant B produces better results. How did SAS 360 Engage do this? By applying automated firepower (i.e. algorithmic clustering) to produce this prescriptive and actionable insight. To learn more about this segment, marketers can profile the audience:

SAS 360 Engage was built with the recognition that some marketing teams don't have data scientists available, and have real needs for analytical automation. To improve upon the concept of A/B/n testing, augmenting this capability with automated, algorithmic segmentation with prescriptive results addresses an important need. Let's assume you've run an A/B/n test with four versions of a page, and variant A was crowned the champion. Wouldn't it be nice to know that if a specific segment arrived at your website, an alternative experience would facilitate a better result?

tags: A/B Testing, Campaign Management, customer journey, data science, digital marketing, Digital Personalization, marketing analytics, predictive analytics, Predictive Marketing, Prescriptive Analytics, SAS 360 Engage, SAS Customer Intelligence 360, segmentation

SAS 360 Engage: A/B testing and algorithmic segmentation was published on Customer Intelligence.

8月 082016
 

There has been much discussion about the relationship between data science and artificial intelligence. It can become a complicated dance when applied data science is partnered with emerging artificial intelligence technologies. Who takes the lead? How do we keep the beat? Can we make sure neither party steps on the […]

Dance hall rules: data science ethics today will impact artificial intelligence tomorrow was published on SAS Voices.

8月 042016
 

SAS Customer Intelligence 360 is a new digital marketing hub offering that enables users to plan, analyze, manage, and track customer journeys. It includes SAS 360 Discover for digital intelligence and SAS 360 Engage for execution capabilities that enable marketers to dynamically create, manage, and place digital content across a variety of channels. These new enhancements to the our customer decision hub extends the capabilities of an organization to orchestrate omnichannel customer activity. Our intent behind this new offering? To enable our clients to take predictive action through their customer-preferred channels, and deliver a desirable, personalized experience.

Woman using tablet on table with coffee

Now that I have delivered the trendy marketing description, let's get down to business on the intersection of digital marketing, analytics, optimization, and personalization. No matter who you chat with (insert any marketing cloud vendor who recently delivered you a sales pitch), or what 2016 marketing conference you attended, it's safe to say this is a popular topic. Let's review the popular buzzwords at the moment:

  • Predictive personalization
  • Data science
  • Machine learning
  • Self-learning algorithms
  • Segment of one
  • Context-aware
  • Real time
  • Automation

It's quite possible you heard these words at such a high frequency, you could have made a drinking game out of it.

What concerns me as I scan the marketing landscape of offerings is the amount of overlap in product descriptions. Does every company do data science equally well? Will the wizardry of automation solve all personalization challenges? While we can all agree that personalization is important, it’s apparent that different organizations can have distinct views of what it actually means, and what it takes to be successful. At the center of the debate is the role of data and sophisticated analytics in personalization best practices. For the past few years, I'm repeatedly asked by clients one specific question:

Do you NEED a data scientist to be successful with data-driven personalization?

At first, I attributed this concern to the perceived lack of analytical talent available for hire. However, there are more than 150 universities offering analytic and data science programs, and talent is flooding into industry. So I placed that stereotype aside and began digging deeper, only to observe that numerous marketing cloud brands were positioning their technology to assume data scientists are NOT needed. This supports the trend of vendors highlighting "easy-button" solutions that address every imaginable obstacle related to scalable personalization. I came across lots of cute descriptions like the "just for them" algorithm, or the "magical machine learning" algorithm. Even imagery of hip marketers wearing augmented reality eyewear while deciphering targeting strategies. Are you kidding me?

When it comes to personalization, I'm uncomfortable with black-box automation, lack of statistical best practices, and the removal of the human analyst. Although 360 Engage Image 3
improvements can be achieved in using automated optimization algorithms, they can’t glean the why behind the what. Machine learning doesn't fully replace real learning. Real learning happens when analysts and marketers partner to dig into data, connect the dots and unearth insights that help brands interact with customers. Embedding those insights into hypotheses, then testing and validating completes the process.

In some ways, automating personalization ignores issues that statisticians and data scientists traditionally think about: sampling populations, confounders, model stability, bias and overfitting. In the rush to take advantage of the hype around big data, these ideas seem to be ignored or not given sufficient attention. Marketers need to pay careful consideration to the nuances of consumer behavior, brand management, and the impact of the facilitated experiences they are delivering.

Remember, SAS has passionately loved everything about analytics for 40 years. We do not care for black-box solutions, so we embedded transparent analytical features into SAS 360 Engage. It was developed with this in mind. We are the leader in advanced customer analytics, and deployed our prowess in data science for digital personalization through "blue-box" analytical decision helpers. These decision helpers are specifically built to be integrated and easy to turn on for marketers that prefer automation and efficiency. However, supporting analysts will have the option to dig deeper into the why behind the decisions. Analysts can exploit their own targeting model creations in conjunction with SAS 360 Engage's automated helpers by leveraging our deep library of algorithms and approachable tools. SAS will not limit you to a single algorithm to solve for complex consumer behavior. Compare, contrast, and most importantly, truly optimize!

This concept of "blue-box" addresses an opportunity for SAS to solve for customer journey challenges, while meeting the needs of your team's preferences. We recognize that some departments don't have data scientists available, and have real needs for automation. SAS 360 Engage offers analytical automation without challenging your team to hire new analytic resources immediately. However, as your organization begins to experience success through data-driven methods, your needs will mature. SAS 360 Engage will support that growth trajectory, and offer attractive features for analysts, statisticians, and data scientists to insert their value-add into your personalization mission.

Do I believe a data scientist is a requirement for data-driven personalization? I believe in a future where approachable technology and analytically-curious people come together to deliver intelligent customer interactions. Analytically-curious people can be data scientists, citizen data scientists, statisticians, marketing analysts, digital marketers, creative superforces, and more. Building teams of these individuals will help you differentiate and compete in today's marketing ecosystem, and SAS 360 Engage was built for the data-driven.

360 Engage Image 4

In the coming weeks, I will be releasing follow-up posts to drill into demonstrations and use cases of SAS 360 Engage. Keep an eye on this space!

 

tags: analytics, customer decision hub, customer intelligence, customer journey, data science, Digital Analytics, digital marketing, Digital Personalization, Integrated Marketing, machine learning, Marketing Personalization, Omnichannel Marketing, Predictive Personalization, SAS 360 Engage

SAS 360 Engage: Delivering blue-box predictive personalization was published on Customer Intelligence.

7月 212016
 

When I was growing up the term “data science” didn’t even exist, let alone dedicated “data scientist” roles. My friends and colleagues might argue that is because I am yet to grow up (!), but do not let this ruin my lead in to the fact that data science as […]

The post When I grow up, I want to be a data scientist appeared first on SAS Learning Post.