Data Visualization

3月 152019
 
SAS makes it easy for you to create a large amount of procedure output with very few statements. However, when you create a large amount of procedure output with the Output Delivery System (ODS), your SAS session might stop responding or run slowly. In some cases, SAS generates a “Not Responding” message. Beginning with SAS® 9.3, the SAS windowing environment creates HTML output by default and enables ODS Graphics by default. If your code creates a large amount of either HTML output or ODS Graphics output, you can experience performance issues in SAS. This blog article discusses how to work around this issue.

Option 1: Enable the Output window instead of the Results Viewer window

By default, the SAS windowing environment with SAS 9.3 and SAS® 9.4 creates procedure output in HTML format and displays that HTML output in the Results Viewer window. However, when a large amount of HTML output is displayed in the Results Viewer window, performance might suffer. To display HTML output in the Results Viewer window, SAS uses an embedded version of Internet Explorer within the SAS environment. And because Internet Explorer does not process large amounts of HTML output well, it can slow down your results.

If you do not need to create HTML output, you can display procedure output in the Output window instead. To do so, add the following statements to the top of your code before the procedure step:

   ods _all_ close; 
   ods listing;

The Output window can show results faster than HTML output that is displayed in the Results Viewer window.

If you want to enable the Output window via the SAS windowing environment, take these steps:

    1. Choose Tools ► Options ► Preferences.
    2. Click the Results tab.
    3. In this window, select Create listing and clear the Create HTML check box.
    4. Click OK.

A large amount of output in the Output window, which typically does not cause a performance issue, might still generate an “Output window is full” message. In that case, you can route your LISTING output to a disk file. Use either the PRINTTO procedure or the ODS LISTING statement with the FILE= option. Here is an example:

   ods _all_ close; 
   ods listing file="sasoutput.lst"; 

Option 2: Disable ODS Graphics

Beginning with SAS 9.3, the SAS windowing environment enables ODS Graphics by default. Therefore, most SAS/STAT® procedures now create graphics output automatically. Naturally, graphics output can take longer to create than regular text output. If you are running a SAS/STAT procedure but you do not need to create graphics output, add the following statement to the code before the procedure step:

   ods graphics off; 

If you want to set this option via the SAS windowing environment, take these steps:

    1. Choose Tools ► Options ► Preferences.
    2. Click the Results tab.
    3. In this window, clear the Use ODS Graphics check box.
    4. Click OK.

For maximum efficiency, you can combine the ODS GRAPHICS OFF statement with the statements listed in the previous section, as shown here:

   ods _all_ close;
   ods listing;
   ods graphics off; 

Option 3: Write ODS output to disk

You can ask SAS to write ODS output to disk but not to create output in the Results Viewer window. To do so, add the following statement to your code before your procedure step:

   ods results off;

Later in your SAS session, if you decide that you want to see output in the Results Viewer window, submit this statement:

   ods results on;

If you want to disable the Results Viewer window via the SAS windowing environment, take these steps:

    1. Choose Tools ► Options ► Preferences.
    2. Click the Results tab.
    3. In this window, clear the View results as they are generated check box.
    4. Click OK.

The ODS RESULTS OFF statement is a valuable debugging tool because it enables you to write ODS output to disk without viewing it in the Results Viewer window. You can then inspect the ODS output file on disk to check the size of it (before you open it).

Option 4: Suppress specific procedure output from the ODS results

In certain situations, you might use multiple procedure steps to send output to ODS. However, if you want to exclude certain procedure output from being written to ODS, use the following statement:

   ods exclude all;

Ensure that you place the statement right before the procedure step that contains the output that you want to suppress.

If necessary, use the following statement when you want to resume sending subsequent procedure output to ODS:

   ods exclude none;

Five reasons to use ODS EXCLUDE to suppress SAS output discusses the ODS EXCLUDE statement in more detail.

Conclusion

Certain web browsers display large HTML files better than others. When you use SAS to create large HTML files, you might try using a web browser such as Chrome, Firefox, or Edge instead of Internet Explorer. However, even browsers such as Chrome, Firefox, and Edge might run slowly when processing a very large HTML file.

Instead, as a substitute for HTML, you might consider creating PDF output (with the ODS PDF destination) or RTF output (with the ODS RTF destination). However, if you end up creating a very large PDF or RTF file, then Adobe (for PDF output) and Microsoft Word (for RTF output) might also experience performance issues.

The information in this blog mainly pertains to the SAS windowing environment. For information about how to resolve ODS issues in SAS® Enterprise Guide®, refer to Take control of ODS results in SAS Enterprise Guide.

How to view or create ODS output without causing SAS® to stop responding or run slowly was published on SAS Users.

2月 282019
 

Across organizations of all types, massive amounts of information are stored in unstructured formats such as video, images, audio, and of course, text. Let’s talk more about text and natural language processing. We know that there is tremendous value buried in call center and chat dialogues, survey comments, product reviews, technical notes, legal contracts, and other sources where context is captured in words versus numbers. But how can we extract the signal we want amidst all the noise?

In this post, we will examine this problem using publicly available descriptions of side effects or adverse events that patients have reported following a vaccination. This Vaccine Adverse Event Reporting System (VAERS) is managed by the CDC and FDA. Among other objectives, these agencies use it to:

* Monitor increases in known adverse events and detect new or unusual vaccine adverse events

* Identify potential patient risk factors, including temporal, demographic, or geographic reporting clusters

Below is a view of the raw data. It contains a text field which holds freeform case notes, along with structured fields which contain the patient’s location, age, sex, date, vaccination details, and flags for serious outcomes such as hospitalization or death.

In this dashboard, notice how we easily can do a search for a keyword “seizure” to filter to patients who have reported this symptom in the comments. However, analysts need much more than just Search. They need to be able to not only investigate all the symptoms an individual patient is experiencing, but also see what patterns are emerging in aggregate so they can detect systemic safety or process issues. To do this, we need to harvest the insights from the freeform text field, and for that we’ll use SAS Visual Text Analytics.

In this solution, we can do many types of text analysis – which you choose depends on the nature of the data and your goals. When we load the data into the solution, it first displays all the variables in the table and detects their types. We could profile the structured fields further to see summary statistics and determine if any data cleansing is appropriate, but for now let’s just build a quick text model for the SYMPTOM_TEXT variable.

After assigning this variable to the “Text” role, SAS Visual Text Analytics automatically builds a pipeline which we can use to string together analytic tasks. In this default pipeline, first we parse the data and identify key entities, and then the solution assigns a sentiment label to each document, discovers topics (i.e. themes) of interest, and categorizes the collection in a meaningful way. Each of these nodes is interactive.

In this post, we’ll show just a tiny piece of overall functionality – how to automatically extract custom entities and relationships using a combination of machine learning and linguistic rules. In the Concepts node, we provide several standard entities to use out of the box. For example, here are the automatic matches to the pre-defined “DATE” concept:

However, for this data, we’re interested in extracting something different – patient symptoms, and where on the body they occurred. Since neither open source Named Entity Recognition (NER) models nor SAS Pre-defined Concepts will do something as domain-specific as this out of the box, it’s up to us to define what we mean by a symptom or a body part under Custom Concepts.

For Body Parts, we started with a list of expected parts from medical dictionaries and subject matter experts. As I iterate through and inspect the results, I might see a keyword or phrase that I missed. In the upcoming version of SAS Visual Text Analytics, I will be able to simply highlight it and right click to add it to the rule set.

We also will be adding a powerful new feature that applies machine learning to suggest additional rules for us. Note that this isn’t a simple thesaurus lookup! Instead, an algorithm is using the matches you’ve already told it are good, combined with the data itself, to learn the pattern you’re interested in. The suggested rules are placed in a new Sandbox area where you can test and evaluate them before adding them to your final definition.

We will also be able to auto-generate fact rules. This will help us pull out meaningful relationships between two entities and suggest a generalized pattern for modeling it. Here, we’ll have the machine determine the best relationship between Body Parts and Localized Symptoms, so that we can answer questions like, “where does it hurt?”, or “what body part was red (or itchy or swollen or tingly, etc.)?”. For this data, the tool suggested a rule which looks for a body part within 6 terms of a symptom, regardless of order, so long as both are contained in the same sentence.

Let’s apply just these few simple rules to our entire dataset and go back to the dashboard view. If we look at the results, we can see now much richer potential for finding insights the data. I can easily select a single patient and see an entire list of his/her side effects alongside key details about the vaccination. I can also compare the most commonly reported symptoms by age group, gender, or geography, or which body parts and symptoms may be predictors of a severe outcome like hospitalization or death.

Of course, there is much more we could do with this data. We could extract the name of the vaccine that was administered, the time to symptom onset, duration period of the symptoms, and other important information. However, even this simple example illustrates the technique and power of contextual extraction, and how it can enhance our ability to analyze large collections of complex data. Currently, concept rule generation is on the forefront of our research efforts in its experimental first stages. This, along with the sandbox testing environment, will make it even faster and easier for analysts to do this work in SAS Visual Text Analytics. Here are a few other resources to check out if you want to dig in further.

Article: Reduce the cost-barrier of generating labeled text data for machine learning algorithms

Paper: Analyzing Text In-Stream and at the Edge

Automatically extracting key information from textual data was published on SAS Users.

2月 272019
 

In this post, we continue our discussion of geography variables, the foundation of Visual Analytics Geo maps. This time we will look at Custom Coordinates.  As with any statistical graph, understanding your data is key.  But when using Custom Coordinates for geographic maps, this understanding becomes even more important.

Use the Custom Coordinate geography variable when your data does not match one of VA’s predefined geography types (see previous post, Fundamentals of SAS Visual Analytics geo maps).  For Custom coordinates, your data set must include latitude and longitude values as separate variables.   These values should be sourced from trustworthy providers and validated for accuracy prior to loading into VA.

When using Custom Coordinates, the Coordinate Space must also be considered.  The coordinate space defines the grid used to plot your data.  The underlying map is also based on a grid.  In order for your data to display correctly on a map, these grids must match.  Visual Analytics uses the World Geodetic System (WGS84) as the default coordinate space (grid).  This will work for most scenarios, including the example below.

Once you have selected a dataset and confirmed it contains the required spatial information, you can now create a Custom Geography variable.  In this example, I am using the variable Business Address from the dataset Wake_Co_Pizza.  Let’s get started.

  1. Begin by opening VA and navigate to the Data panel on the left of the application.
  2. Select the dataset and locate the variable that you wish to map. Click the down arrow to the right of the variable and chose ‘Geography’ from the Classification dropdown menu.
  3. The ‘Edit Geography Item’ window appears. Select Custom coordinates in the ‘Geography data type’ dropdown.   Three new dropdown lists appear that are specific to the Custom coordinates data type: ‘Latitude (y)’, ‘Longitude (x)’ and ‘Coordinate Space’.

When using the Custom coordinates data type, we must tell VA where to find the spatial data in our dataset.  We do this using the Latitude (y) and Longitude (x) dropdown lists.  They contain all measures from your dataset.  In this example, the variable ‘Latitude World Geodetic System’ contains our latitude values and the variable  ‘Longitude World Geodetic System’ contains our longitude values.   The ‘Coordinate Space’ dropdown defaults to World Geodetic System (WGS84) and is the correct choice for this example.

  1. Click the OK button to complete the setup once the latitude and longitude variables have been selected from their respective dropdown lists. You should see a new ‘Geography’ section in the Data panel.  The name of the variable (or its edited value) will be displayed beside a globe icon to indicate it is a geography variable.  In this case we see the variable Business Address.

 

Congratulations!  You have now created a custom geography variable and are ready to display it on a map.  To do this, simply drag it from the Data panel and drop it on the report canvas.  The auto-map feature of VA will recognize it as a geography variable and display the data as a bubble map with an OpenStreetMap background.

In this post, we created a custom geography variable using the default Coordinate Space.  Using a custom geography variable gives you the flexibility of mapping data sets that contain valid latitude and longitude values.  Next time, we will take our exploration of the geography variable one step further and explore using custom polygons in your maps.

Using Custom Coordinates for map creation in SAS Visual Analytics was published on SAS Users.

2月 152019
 
Beginning with SAS® 9.4, you can embed graphics output within HTML output using the ODS HTML5 destination. This technique works with SAS/GRAPH® procedures (such as GPLOT and GCHART), SG procedures (such as SGPLOT and SGRENDER), and when you create graphics output with ODS Graphics enabled. Most (if not all) existing web browsers support graphics output embedded in HTML5 output.

Note: The default graphics output format for the ODS HTML5 destination is Scalable Vector Graphics (SVG). SVG documents display clearly at any size in any viewer or browser that supports SVG. So, SVG files are ideal for display on a computer monitor, PDA, or cell phone; or printed documents. Because it's a vector graphic, a single SVG document can be transformed to any screen resolution without compromising the clarity of the document. Here's an example:

The same SVG graph, scaled at 90% and then at 200%. But 100% crisp!

SAS/GRAPH procedures

When you use the ODS HTML5 destination with a SAS/GRAPH procedure, specify a value of SVG, PNG, or JPEG for the DEVICE option in the GOPTIONS statement. The following sample PROC GPLOT code embeds SVG graphics inside the resulting HTML output:

goptions device=svg;
ods _all_ close;  
ods html5 path="c:\temp" file="svg_graph.html"; 
symbol1 i=none v=squarefilled; 
proc gplot data=sashelp.cars; 
  plot mpg_city * horsepower;   
  where make="Honda"; 
run;
quit;  
ods html5 close; 
ods preferences;

Note that the ODS PREFERENCES statement above resets the ODS environment back to its default settings when you use the SAS windowing environment.

When you use the PNG or JPEG device driver with the ODS HTML5 destination, add the BITMAP_MODE="INLINE" option to the ODS HTML5 statement. Here is an example:

goptions device=png;
ods _all_ close; 
ods html5 path="c:\temp" file="png_graph.html"     options(bitmap_mode="inline");
symbol1 i=none v=squarefilled; 
proc gplot data=sashelp.cars; 
  plot mpg_city * horsepower;   
  where make="Honda"; 
run;
quit;  
ods html5 close; 
ods preferences;

ODS Graphics and SG procedures

When you use SG procedures and ODS Graphics, specify a value of SVG, PNG, or JPEG for the OUTPUTFMT option in the ODS GRAPHICS statement. The following sample code uses PROC SGPLOT to embed SVG graphics inside the HTML output with the ODS HTML5 destination:

ods _all_ close; 
ods html5 path="c:\temp" file="svg_graph.html"; 
ods graphics on / reset=all outputfmt=svg;
proc sgplot data=sashelp.cars; 
  scatter y=mpg_city x=horsepower / markerattrs=(size=9PT symbol=squarefilled);   
  where make="Honda"; 
run;
ods html5 close; 
ods preferences;  

The following sample code uses PROC SGPLOT to embed PNG graphics inside the HTML output with the ODS HTML5 destination:

ods _all_ close; 
ods html5 path="c:\temp" file="png_graph.html" options(bitmap_mode="inline");   
      ods graphics on / reset=all outputfmt=png;
proc sgplot data=sashelp.cars; 
  scatter y=mpg_city x=horsepower / markerattrs=(size=9PT symbol=squarefilled);   
  where make="Honda"; 
run;
      ods html5 close; 
      ods preferences; 

The technique above also works when you use the ODS GRAPHICS ON statement with other procedures that produce graphics output (such as the LIFETEST procedure).

Note that the ODS HTML5 destination supports the SAS Graphics Accelerator. The SAS Graphics Accelerator enables users with visual impairments or blindness to create, explore, and share data visualizations. It supports alternative presentations of data visualizations that include enhanced visual rendering, text descriptions, tabular data, and interactive sonification. Sonification uses non-speech audio to convey important information about the graph.

You can use the ODS HTML5 destination in most situations where you need to embed all of your output into a single HTML output location. For example, when you email HTML output as an attachment or when you create graphics output via a SAS stored process. If you currently use the ODS HTML destination, you might want to experiment with the ODS HTML5 destination to see whether it meets your needs even if you cannot completely switch to it yet.

Embed scalable graphics using the ODS HTML5 destination was published on SAS Users.

2月 082019
 

Creating a map with SAS Visual Analytics begins with the geographic variable.  The geographic variable is a special type of data variable where each item has a latitude and longitude value.  For maximum flexibility, VA supports three types of geography variables:

  1. Predefined
  2. Custom coordinates
  3. Custom polygons

This is the first in a series of posts that will discuss each type of geography variable and their creation. The predefined geography variable is the easiest and quickest way to begin and will be the focus of this post.

SAS Visual Analytics comes with nine (9) predefined geographic lookup types.  This lookup method requires that your data contains a variable matching one of these nine data types:

  • Country or Region Names – Full proper name of a country or region (ISO 3166-1)
  • Country or Region ISO 2-Letter Codes – Alpha-2 country code (ISO 3166-1)
  • Country or Region ISO Numeric Codes – Numeric-3 country code (ISO 3166-1)
  • Country or Region SAS Map ID Values – SAS ID values from MPASGFK continent data sets
  • Subdivision (State, Province) Names – Full proper name for level 2 admin regions (ISO 3166-2)
  • Subdivision (State, Province) SAS Map ID Values – SAS ID values from MAPSGFK continent data sets (Level 1)
  • US State Names – Full proper name for US State
  • US State Abbreviations – Two letter US State abbreviation
  • US Zip Codes – A 5-digit US zip code (no regions)

Once you have identified a variable in your dataset matching one of these types, you are ready to begin.  For our example map, the dataset 'Crime' and variable 'State name' will be used.  Let’s get started.

Creating a predefined geography variable in SAS Visual Analytics

  1. Begin by opening VA and navigate to the Data panel on the left of the application.
  2. Select the desired dataset and locate a variable that matches one of the predefined lookup types discussed above. Click the down arrow to the right of the variable and select ‘Geography’ from the Classification dropdown menu.
  3. The ‘Edit Geography Item’ window will open. Depending upon the type of geography variable selected, some of the options on this dialog will vary.  The 'Name' textbox is common for all types and will contain the variable selected from your dataset.  Edit this label as needed to make it more user friendly for your intended audience.
  4. The ‘Geography data type’ drop down list is where you select the desired type of geography variable.  In this example, we are using the default predefined option.
  5. Locate the 'Name or code context' dropdown list.  Select the type of predefined variable that matches the data type of the variable chosen from your data.  Once selected, VA scans your data and does an internal lookup on each data item.  This process identifies latitude and longitude values for each item of your dataset.  Lookup results are shown on the right of the window as a percentage and a thumbnail size map.  The thumbnail map displays the the first 100 matches.
  6. If there are any unmatched data items, the first 5 will be displayed.  This may provide a better understanding of your data.  In this example, it is clear from variable name as to what type should be selected (US State Names).  However, in most cases that choice will not be this obvious.  The lesson here, know your data!

Unmatched data items indicators

Once you are satisfied with the matched results, click the OK button to continue.  You should see a new section in the Data panel labeled ‘Geography’.  The name of the variable will be displayed beside a globe icon. This icon represents the geography variable and provides confirmation it was created successfully.

Icon change for geography variable

Now that the geography variable has been created, we are ready to create a map.  To do this, simply drag it from the Data panel and drop it on the VA report canvas.  The auto-map feature of VA will recognize the geography variable and create a bubble map with an OpenStreetMap background.  Congratulations!  You have just created your first map in VA.

Bubble map created with predefined geography variable

The concept of a geography variable was introduced in this post as the foundation for creating all maps in VA.  Using the predefined geography variable is the quickest way to get started with Geo maps.  In situations when the predefined type is not possible, using one of VA's custom geography types becomes necessary.  These scenarios will be discussed in future blog posts.

Fundamentals of SAS Visual Analytics geo maps was published on SAS Users.

11月 282018
 
One of the great things about programming with SAS® software is that there are many ways to accomplish the same task. And, since SAS often adds new features that can make a task easier, it's important to stay informed.

This blog shows a few samples of graphs and explains how you can use new functionality to make the old graphs look new again. Over the past several releases, SAS has added more options and procedures for ODS Graphics. While your tried-and-true SAS/GRAPH programs still work, ODS Graphics can create modern-looking graphs with less code, while providing more output options. And, ODS Graphics is part of Base SAS, which means that all of these techniques work in SAS University Edition.

Note: All the graphs in this blog are created using the fifth maintenance release of SAS® 9.4M5 (TS1M5). Not all options are available in prior releases of SAS.

Adding special symbols on a graph

The following graph is created with the DATA Step Graphics Interface (DSGI), which draws the horizontal bars and airplanes as well as places the text.

However, the DSGI is not supported in releases after SAS® 9.3. In SAS 9.4 and later, you can create a similar graph using the SYMBOLCHAR statement in the SGPLOT procedure. Using this statement in PROC SGPLOT references the hexadecimal value for the airplane symbol, as shown below:

To create this graph with PROC SGPLOT, submit the following code:

data planes;
   input month $ number;
   xval2=number + 2000;
   low=0;
   format number comma8.;
   cards;
Jan 13399
Feb 13284
Mar 14725
Apr 15370
May 16252
Jun 15684
Jul 15313
Aug 16005
;
title1 height=14pt 'Number of Flights at Raleigh Durham International Airport';
title2 height=14pt 'By Month for 2018';
footnote1 height=12pt 'Source: Federal Aviation Administration TFMSC Report (Airport)';
 
 
 
proc sgplot data=planes noautolegend noborder;
hbarbasic month / response=number fillattrs=(color=graydd) nooutline
barwidth=0.5 baselineattrs=(thickness=0px);
symbolchar name=airplane char='2708'x / hoffset=0.3 voffset=0.05;
scatter x=number y=month /markerattrs=(symbol=airplane size=60px
color=black);
scatter x=xval2 y=month / markerchar=number markercharattrs=(size=14pt);
xaxis offsetmin=0 display=none;
yaxis display=(noline noticks nolabel) valueattrs=(size=14pt)
offsetmin=0.025 offsetmax=0.025;
run;

For information about PROC SGPLOT, see SGPLOT Procedure in SAS® 9.4 ODS Graphics: Procedures Guide, Sixth Edition.

For more information about the SYMBOLCHAR statement, see the section "SYMBOLCHAR Statement" in the "SGPLOT Procedure" chapter of SAS® 9.4 ODS Graphics: Procedures Guide, Sixth Edition.

Assigning colors to data values

The next example graphs show the results for a fictitious ice-cream flavor survey. Because not all the ice cream flavors are present in each survey group, macro code is used to conditionally define the PATTERN statements based on the values in the data.

You can achieve the same more easily by using attribute maps in PROC SGPLOT to associate the attributes, such as color, with data values so that the same color is always associated with the same data value. The following graph, which is similar to the one above, is created using this method:

To create this graph, submit the following code:

/* Create the input data set ICECREAM */
data icecream;
   input @1 Flavor $10. @12 Rank 1. @14 GRP $1.;
   datalines;
Strawberry 2 B
Chocolate  1 B
Vanilla    3 B
Strawberry 2 A
Vanilla    1 A
;
run;
 
proc sort;
by grp;
run;
 
data attrmap;
id='barcolors';
length value fillcolor linecolor $10;
input value $ fillcolor $;
linecolor=fillcolor;
datalines;
Strawberry pink
Chocolate CX7B3F00
Vanilla beige
;
run;
options nobyline;
title "Ice Cream Survey for Group #byval(grp)";
 
proc sgplot data=icecream dattrmap=attrmap noautolegend;
by grp;
vbar flavor / response=rank group=flavor attrid=barcolors dataskin=pressed;
run;

I changed the colors for the bars in the PROC SGPLOT code so that the bar colors look more like the ice cream that they represent. I also added the DATASKIN= option for the bars to enhance the visual appeal of the bars in the graph.

For more information about attribute maps, see the section Using Attribute Maps to Control Visual Attributes in the SAS® 9.4 ODS Graphics: Procedures Guide, Sixth Edition.

Combining BY-group graphs into a single page

The following graph shows two plots that are created by using PROC GPLOT with a BY statement. The graphs are then paneled side-by-side with the GREPLAY procedure.

You can use the SGPANEL procedure to create the same plots in side-by-side panels. The benefit to this method is that you need only one procedure both to create the plots and to panel them, as shown below:

To create these paneled plots, submit the following code:

proc sgpanel data=sashelp.class;
panelby sex / novarname rows=1 columns=2;
scatter x=age y=height;
run;

Placing symbols and labels on a map

The next graph uses the Annotate facility with the SAS/GRAPH GMAP and GPROJECT procedures to place a symbol and city name at the location of select cities in North Carolina.

Beginning with the fifth maintenance release of SAS 9.4M5 (TS1M5) in 64-bit Windows and 64-bit Linux operating environments, you can use the SGMAP procedure to create such maps. Using this method, you can create maps that show much more detail.

You can use PROC SGMAP with the OPENSTREETMAP, SCATTER, and TEXT statements to create a similar graph, as shown below:

To create this map, submit the following code:

data cities;
input y x city $20.;
cards;
35.6125 -77.36667 Greenville 
36.21667 -81.67472 Boone
35.913064 -79.056112 Chapel Hill
;
run;
 
data dummy;
input y2 x2;
datalines;
33.857977 -84.321869
36.548759 -75.460423
;
 
data cities;
set cities dummy;
run;
title1 h=10pt 'Place points on a map at city locations';
 
proc sgmap plotdata=cities;
openstreetmap;
scatter x=x y=y / markerattrs=(color=red size=10px symbol=circlefilled);
scatter x=x2 y=y2 / markerattrs=(size=0px);
text x=x y=y text=city / textattrs=(size=10pt) position=right;
run;

Because the OPENSTREETMAP statement is used in PROC SGMAP, more detail (for example, cities and roads) is included in the map.

The DUMMY data set adds coordinates to the points that are plotted to modify the display area of the map.

For more information about controlling the display area of the map, see the article How to Control Map Display Area with PROC SGMAP.

For more information about PROC SGMAP, see the SGMAP Procedure chapter in SAS/GRAPH® and Base SAS® 9.4: Mapping Reference.

See also

Many of these features have been covered in more depth within other blog articles. Visit these articles to learn more!
Examples of adding special symbols in your charts using the SYMBOLCHAR statement
Using the new SGMAP procedure to create maps in Base SAS
Adding data-driven features to your charts with ATTRS options
Controlling your graph appearance with DATASKIN and FILLTYPE options

Making great graphs even better with ODS Graphics was published on SAS Users.

11月 092018
 

In parts one and two of this blog posting series, we introduced machine learning models and the complexity that comes along with their extraordinary predictive abilities. Following this, we defined interpretability within machine learning, made the case for why we need it, and where it applies. In part three of [...]

SAS Customer Intelligence 360: A look inside the black box of machine learning [Part 3] was published on Customer Intelligence Blog.

11月 092018
 

In parts one and two of this blog posting series, we introduced machine learning models and the complexity that comes along with their extraordinary predictive abilities. Following this, we defined interpretability within machine learning, made the case for why we need it, and where it applies. In part three of [...]

SAS Customer Intelligence 360: A look inside the black box of machine learning [Part 3] was published on Customer Intelligence Blog.

11月 052018
 

In part one of this blog posting series, we introduced machine learning models as a multifaceted and evolving topic. The complexity that gives extraordinary predictive abilities also makes these models challenging to understand. They generally don’t provide a clear explanation, and brands experimenting with machine learning are questioning whether they [...]

SAS Customer Intelligence 360: A look inside the black box of machine learning [Part 2] was published on Customer Intelligence Blog.

11月 012018
 

As machine learning takes its place in numerous advances within the marketing ecosystem, the interpretability of these modernized algorithmic approaches grows in importance. According to my SAS peer Ilknur Kaynar Kabul: We are surrounded with applications powered by machine learning, and we’re personally affected by the decisions made by machines [...]

SAS Customer Intelligence 360: A look inside the black box of machine learning [Part 1] was published on Customer Intelligence Blog.