events

6月 072014
 

Integrated marketing is no longer optional - no single channel can win out any more. Marketers must deliver great customer experience through truly integrated marketing, across any and every channel: web, social, mobile, broadcast, email, in-store, outdoor and beyond. Those experiences can be tailored effectively by listening to the voice of the customer.

Integrated Marketing Week in New York City.That concept was the core idea of a session at this past week's Integrated Marketing Week conference in New York City featuring noted Voice of the Customer thought leader Ernan Roman, Ben J. Lerer, CEO and Co-Founder of Thrilllist Media and Elias Roman, CEO and Co-Founder of Songza.

The highlights of the session were captured by Stephanie Miller, VP of Member Relations at the DMA and posted to the DMA Advance blog. I am happy to have her permission to repost an excerpt here:

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Ernan Roman

Ernan Roman

A cataclysmic shift has taken over modern marketing:  We are moving from ”forcing customers to sort through piles of spray and pray stuff to find relevance to a world where personalized, relevant communications find consumers based on their opt-in preferences.”

Asking your customers what they want from you is the first step toward making that shift for your own brands, said Ernan Roman at Integrated Marketing Week.

Roman's company conducted over 10,000 hours of Voice of the Customer research for customers such as MassMutual, IBM and QVC for six requirements to emerge for how customers define "customer experience:"

  1. Improve the customer experience across every point of contact with your organization.
  2. Apply this approach to all elements of the media mix and all departments of your organization.
  3. High quality experiences must be maintain throughout the relationship, not just when you are “selling.”
  4. Customer experiences must be driven by the customer’s individual preferences regarding message, timing, frequency and media mix.
  5. Preferences must drive high quality personalization of communications and experiences
  6. Absolute commitment to safeguarding privacy of preferences information is essential.
Ben J. Lerer, CEO of Thrillist

Ben J. Lerer

Listening to the voice of your customer will give you the “opportunity to fundamentally re-conceive how you engage with customers,” Ernan said.  “This creates a new kind of reciprocity of value equation and transforms the customer experience.

One notable example of this is Thrillist Media, which reduced email sends by 20%, increased traffic to the site, reduced unsubscribes by 50% and increased engagement by 15%”, all while delivering a more personalized product,” per CEO Ben J. Lerer.

Putting that together is the challenge, but Thrilllist results demonstrate the power of this approach for multi-channel engagement.  Ben’s tips for other smart marketers are:

  1. Customize for each platform
  2. Be your brand every step of the way
  3. Be cool, not creepy
  4. Pay attention to what they are buying
  5. Make the user feel like a VIP.
Elias Roman, CEO of Songza

Elias Roman

Another digital lifestyle player, Songza, uses voice of the customer research to “differentiate through deep personalization  across channels," said panelist Elias Roman, CEO and Co-Founder.

Songza is designed to be a “music concierge” that delivers the perfect streaming playlist to match every activity of the day. Roman shared his big learnings in delivering such a customer-centric experience:

.

  1. Also use non-personal data to personalize
  2. Make users want to give you personal information
  3. Use technology to feel more human
  4. Design like every screen is a small screen.

The future of content is not “search and browse,” he said.   “And it’s not just personalized to your preferences. It’s personalized to your needs right now.

“The context will dictate the content you need,”  he said. In this way, Songza personalizes the product not just to the person, but to what the person is doing or desiring at that moment.

Elias showed how Songza learns what you like – using both inputs of preferences at the moment of the request (e.g.: It’s game day and I want a country music soundtrack) and data-driven assessments to predict and recommend future selections.

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Each of these marketing leaders have offered a few tips on how to listen to the voice of the customer. How about you  - are you listening?

tags: analytics, DMA, events, voice of the customer
6月 072014
 

Integrated marketing is not a mere discipline, or an approach to marketing. It's a description of the mindset necessary for marketers to rise to the challenges of empowered customers, regulatory change and technological evolution that includes big data.

Michael Steinhart is Executive Editor at AllAnalytics.com.

Michael Steinhart, Executive Editor at AllAnalytics.com.

That was a recurring theme in this week's Integrated Marketing Week conference by the DMA in New York, where multiple speakers affirmed the need for marketers to change their mindset in order to meet our collective need to be integrated marketers.

I had the privilege to attend the event and I'm pleased to have permission to share some insights in this terrific blog post by Michael Steinhart at AllAnalytics.com.

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Big data is surrounded by so much hype and so many v-words that marketing professionals don't trust it and don't understand how valuable it is to their efforts. That's the conclusion drawn by Forrester analyst Fatemeh Khatibloo, who writes about it in her blog and spoke about it at the Integrated Marketing Week conference in New York this week.

Fatemeh Khatibloo, Senior Analyst at Forrester, serves customer insights professionals.

Fatemeh Khatibloo, Senior Analyst at Forrester

Marketers can take some comfort in the fact that consumers are equally confused, she said. Their primary question should be "How can big data help me delight my customers?"

"Big data is not a technology, not a platform, not a project, and not an end goal," she said. "The three v's don't help define anything. Don't get Hadooped!" Instead, marketers should adopt the concept that "Big data is the practices and technologies that close the gap between the data available and a company's ability to turn it into business insight."

It's not going to be tidy or neat, she added, but the huge amounts of data available are making an "infinite" number of combinations possible.

As examples, she cited the insight electronics manufacturers could glean from knowing whether customers use rechargeable or disposable batteries, and the value in knowing whether new parents have a single baby or twins.

Companies that are "killing it" in this area include Progressive auto insurance, with its Snapshot usage-based rates; Clorox bleach, which boosted profits significantly by increasing shipments to areas affected by flu outbreaks; and British Airways, which updates flight attendants' mobile devices with key information about passengers.

Stop snooping
This last example naturally led into a discussion of customer privacy, which is an area fraught with potential danger. Khatibloo cited examples such as Target's outing of a pregnant teen and the inaccuracies found in Google's flu trend information as illustrative of how badly big data can run a company's marketing efforts off-track.

"Be smart, consider context, and be responsible," she said.

Rule of three
To succeed with big-data analytics, marketers need to keep three ideas in mind:

  • The context of the customer during the moment of engagement, which spells the difference between Disney's MagicBands and Target's faux pas
  • The company culture around analytics -- in other words, no more hoarding data and no more IT/business chasm. Marketing and the CIO must sit down together
  • Analytics talent, which should break out into scientists who interrogate the data, engineers who manage the architecture, and stewards who ensure compliance

On the subject of privacy, Khatibloo added that consumer demand is the only factor that will drive change in the industry. She cited the recent FTC guidelines here, and the European Union's "Right to be Forgotten" legislation, as two examples of government intervention in consumer privacy protection that will not produce any significant results. (We've reached roughly the same conclusions in our conversations on FTC Pushes Congress to Act on Data Brokers and EU Court to Google: Forget It.)

What do you think, members? Do Khatibloo's ideas align with the state of affairs at your company? Share your experiences below.

tags: analytics, big data, DMA, events
3月 212014
 
SAS users at the SUNZ conference in Wellington

SAS users at the SUNZ conference in Wellington

With a record-high 309 in attendance at SUNZ 2014, seems every SAS user in New Zealand was at Te Papa Museum in Wellington last month for the flagship user conference. If you were unable to attend, you missed a great presentation by me and lots of good ones by everyone else.

But in all seriousness, the conference was a success, and we were honored to have a distinguished lineup of speakers from both the public and private sectors.

The day opened with Minister for Social Development Paula Bennett discussing her department’s use of SAS to protect vulnerable children. Bennett told how predictive risk modeling is being used by the state to summarize information about children quickly so frontline workers can better protect those in need.

“We found it’s possible to pinpoint which children are most at risk before harm is done,” said Bennett. For more on this story, watch SAS Analytics helps the Ministry of Social Development in New Zealand. You can also watch Bennett's SUNZ speech or read the transcript.

Next came a complimentary keynote from James Mansell, Director of Innovation and Strategy at the Ministry of Social Development. Mansell added that analytics is essential in the public sector – however, data must be shared for benefits to be fully realized. “Until we can join up data across the various organizations looking after citizens, we cannot act as effectively and deliver better outcomes,” said Mansell.

He was followed by Kiwibank Senior Economist Donna Purdue, who energized the room with news of New Zealand’s bright economic future, noting 2014 is shaping up to be a bumper year.

With the morning sessions in the bag, the group enjoyed some tea before splitting off into the various business, technology and SAS update streams. One I’ll mention was by Loyalty New Zealand Analytics Manager Vince Morder, who described his company’s use of SAS® Customer Intelligence to understand shopping patterns and increase partner involvement with its popular Fly Buys program. Another was by Carl Rajendram, National Manager of Commercial Pricing and Analytics with NZI Insurance. Rajendram delivered a passionate testimony of his company’s use of SAS® Data Quality to evaluate risk and optimize insurance pricing.

Select presentations are available on the SUNZ website.

Much like the braided streams that converge into the Pacific, attendees convened once again in the Soundings Theatre for Ken Quarrie’s locknote presentation, “The Game is Changing.” Quarrie is Senior Scientist for New Zealand Rugby, and he held the room in rapture as he showed old footage, remarking how analytics has been instrumental in helping the All Blacks prevent injury, improve player performance and lead to an overall exceptional win ratio.

And finally, it wouldn’t be a SUNZ conference without cold beers to end it – a fitting conclusion for a family of SAS users who form a close community of bright, passionate professionals – all working to make New Zealand a smarter and safer place.

***

For press coverage of SUNZ 2014, see the links below.

tags: analytics, big data, New Zealand, SAS users
1月 282014
 
Bob Whitehead (left) with Bankwest SAS Account Manager, Scott Goodsell (right)

Bob Whitehead (left) with Bankwest SAS Account Manager, Scott Goodsell (right)

The New Year brings fresh opportunities and 2014 is an exciting year for SAS users in the Australia New Zealand (ANZ) region to form connections, share ideas and get inspired! At the start of 2013, Hanlie Myburgh, SAS Customer Advocacy Manager for ANZ, announced a new incentive to encourage SAS users to present at their local SAS user group: the Best Presentation Award. This award is given to the presenter with the best presentation content determined by attendee feedback in the evaluation form/online survey. The winner receives an Apple iPod and the chance to win the MAIN PRIZE – a trip to SAS Global Forum 2014 in March, with flights, accommodation and registration expenses all covered by SAS Institute Australia. In 2013 there were 15 best presentation winners who were placed in the random draw for the MAIN PRIZE and on Friday 17th January 2014 Bob Whitehead was awarded the trip to SAS Global Forum 2014. Bob shares his experience in being a presenter at WASUP as follows:

“I have always enjoyed presenting new topics at these events. The opportunity to learn something new and impart that knowledge to other SAS customers is a great experience. The unexpected surprise of winning a trip to the SAS Global Forum in Washington DC this year is obviously fantastic.  After almost 30 years of being involved with SAS, I have yet to attend a SAS Global Forum.”

Bob would also like to “Thank SAS Institute Australia for supporting the various user community groups around Australia and providing such a great incentive for people who choose to present papers.”

Keep an eye out for Bob’s presentation on his experience at SAS Global Forum 2014 at the Q2 2014 WASUP meeting in June.

What about you?  Have you considered being a SAS user group presenter? There are many discussions and blogs on the personal and professional benefits of presenting at a local, regional or global user group. Some benefits mentioned over the past year are:

  • Presenting helps to strengthen presentation and public speaking skills
  • It allows us to share information with, and to get advice from, our peers
  • It is an opportunity to stimulate ideas through collaboration
  • It provides inspiration to others by sharing knowledge
  • It allows the presenter to seek guidance and direction in their own SAS knowledge and learning
  • It gives back to the community

These comments come from SAS users across the entire ANZ region at all levels of knowledge and experience. I am sure you will agree that presenting at a user group can be encouraging and valuable for all SAS users and students in our left-of-the-date-line community.

With the SUNZ conference in Wellington, New Zealand on the 18th February, and plans underway for the 1st quarter Australia SAS user group meetings, now is your opportunity to share the work that you have done, be recognized by your peers, and be rewarded personally and professionally for achieving your goals. And don’t forget the MAIN PRIZE, a chance to win a trip to SAS Global Forum 2015! If you are interested in presenting at a SAS user group meeting this year, let your SAS ANZ user group committee know before the presenter slots are filled!

If you are unsure about presenting and would like to discuss further with SAS ANZ user group committee members and users, feel free to start a discussion on SANZOC, our online community to complement the local SAS user group meetings within the Australia and New Zealand region through online collaboration, networking and sharing. We look forward in seeing you there…

Join SANZOC now!

tags: analytics, Australia, sas, skills, success
1月 212014
 

Lights, Camera, Analytics! These three words best describe the unique experience which we had in India recently. Five days packed with customer interviews, recording insights on how they are leveraging analytics and data management to drive business outcomes, curb fraud, increase efficiencies and create a better future. Technical and business users, from organisations across Indian industries such as automobile, utilities, banking, government, education, etc., shared their views on SAS Solutions and also underlined the creativity with which they are using analytics to drive business impact.  It is clear that analytics is gaining acceptance as a key enabler of competitive advantage. Are you getting the most out of analytics?

To give you a feel of it, let me take you seventeen years back in time - When Arnold Schwarzenegger ventured on a mission to buy an action figure for his seven year old son, in the movie ‘Jingle all the way’. In the ensuing chase, he lands-up attaining much more than he ever thought and shares a delightful moment with his loved ones. In no ways, did I go out on a chase to procure a Christmas sell-out toy. However, the results derived out of this busy week was nothing less than a delight. While I was hoping that we get a chance to interact with 3-4 customers, we landed-up recording eight success stories. We interacted with customers from across Indian cities and industries. The week was packed with customer interviews, event, travel, interactions and loads of business insights. Right from the largest automobile manufacturer in India to an organisation that provides power to the commercial capital of the country to state government to two of the best B-schools in India to private banks, the week unfolded a new story with every passing day.

I wasn’t alone in this initiative, though. Bill Marriott, who’s the Sr. Director of Video Communications and New Media at SAS, travelled all the way from Cary, North Carolina to Mumbai. The week started with an interview with one of the largest private sector banks in India. The interaction highlighted how this growing private sector bank leverages analytics for curbing fraud and deriving insights from their goldmine of data. They shared valuable views on how the Indian banking industry has transformed over the years and explained the underlying importance of creating a delightful customer experience. After interviewing both the Chief Risk Officer and Head of Analytics at the bank, we ended the day with a great start to the week.

Day 2 was packed with three back-to-back interviews with the IT Secretary of one of the states in India and with two leading B-Schools in the country. The customers travelled down to SAS’ Mumbai office for the interviews. The first one to be interviewed was the IT Secretary of State Government. He talked about his experiences with data management and its importance in delivering citizen benefits. The importance of integrating data from multiple sources, removing duplicate entries, ensuring quality data and assigning unique identification to citizens. It was very insightful to learn how a technology like data management and data visualisation is empowering government to ensure that the needy citizens derive benefits of government schemes and fraud/leakages are plugged. By the time this interview was over, it was time for a heavy Indian lunch, especially for Bill. Later in the day, we interacted with senior associates from the B-Schools. This was a different experience altogether as the institutes shared how they are leveraging SAS’ analytical expertise to create business leaders of the future. They receive student admissions from varied cultural and professional backgrounds, with each student having a different career aspiration. They leverage SAS to impart MBA aspirants with a confluence of managerial and analytical skills.

Day 3, we were on the other side of the city for an interaction with a leading power distribution company. Electricity is something that we take for granted. Seldom do we think that if one machinery gets malfunctioned or one switch gets erroneously turned off, it can bring the entire city to a halt. Senior executives from the organisation talked about load forecasting and how it enables them in meeting the regulatory requirements and at the same time distribute power efficiently and save costs. They also showed us their distribution, operations and monitoring facilities. It was truly a great learning experience.

Day 4 and we were off from Mumbai to another beautiful city – Kochi. Here we interviewed the IT Head from a leading bank. He shared his views on how SAS has helped them in creation and allocation of unique customer identifications to customers and removing duplicates from customer database. This helps them meet regulatory requirements, gain a unique view of their customers, create a customer family view, optimise marketing campaigns and empower the branch manager/staff. The day not only ended with insights but also ended with an extra-large plate of South-Indian food, besides the pool.

Day 5 was a tricky one, as I had to head back to Mumbai for attending an event which we were conducting in association with InformationWeek and Bill had to fly down to Delhi to interview a leading automobile company in India. On one hand the event saw good turnout despite the bank holiday. Bill, on the other hand, conducted a successful interview with the customer. Their IT Head shared insights on how they are using SAS Solutions in order to optimise production, reduce delivery times, improve marketing ROI and derive customer intelligence.  Back in Mumbai, the event was the perfect conclusion to my action-packed week. The event saw participation from industries such as insurance, consumer goods, manufacturing, banking, telecom, oil & gas, etc. CIOs, IT heads and senior analytics professionals presented their views on upcoming trends in analytics, usage of analytics in their organisation, importance of business intelligence, data management in the age of big data, road to an analytical enterprise, and so on. To me, this was the perfect summary of the week.

Five days… multiple experiences. Experiences that reflected how organisations across different parts of the country and different industries are creatively using SAS’ expertise in analytics, business intelligence & data management to drive business objectives. Each organisation has a different set of goals and different game-plan to achieve the desired growth. Each one leverages technology for a different purpose altogether. They view technology not just as an enabler but as a secret sauce, that can be mixed with the overall business recipe to create a competitive edge. My moment of delight was not when the week ended. But, it was hidden within every interaction – especially when customers talked about the value which they derived from SAS solutions and how SAS helped them in driving business impact.

Stay tuned for a host of Customer Success Videos coming-up soon.

Click here to view a host of existing Customer Success Stories.

tags: analytics, BI, case study, customer success, data management, India, sas
8月 152013
 
At SAS Forum Sydney 2013, Dr Jim Goodnight SAS CEO opens the session

Dr Jim Goodnight SAS CEO at SAS Forum Sydney 2013

This week Sydney played host to two conferences that for me, underpinned the theme of analytics everywhere that my colleague Vincent Cotte noted about SAS Global Forum. First on my agenda was SAS Forum Sydney 2013, where over 1,000 people gathered to hear from leaders in the analytics space, including SAS customers and staff. You can recap the agenda over there, or download the presentations over here.

First up, I'll cover off some of the more salient takeaways from SAS Forum for marketers. If you’re in marketing, you can’t have missed the change from colouring in to data-driven marketing. Do you have an Emergent CMO? One who understands the new art and science of marketing? Or are you still looking to IT to solve your problems?

Michael Pascoe, journalist, opened the event with the bold statement “Australia does not have a budget problem” and that set the tone for the day – spend! Use what you know to make it count, be more creative and use your intelligence. More telling, and also what became a theme for the day was the data story.  David Bowie, the Managing Director of SAS Australia, really brought this home with his statement that it’s not enough to just think about your customers, you need to think like your customers - what story are they telling you through their data? And are you listening?

At SAS, we know analytics is the key to actually doing this and we pay more than lip service to the idea of customer-centricity. We recently released this story of how we are drinking our own champagne and using the SAS customer intelligence suite  to build a full picture of the customer interaction leading to dramatic increases in response rates.

Back to SAS Forum ... it was  a packed day of hearing just how our customers think like their customers – eye-opening to be sure. For instance, as a result of better customer insights achieved through its data analytics initiative, KnowMe, Westpac Bank is achieving a 40 per cent uptake on customer offers. Later at the ABO panel, David Mortimer went on to tell us that the customer is actually the one in power now. If you want to unlock that power, it’s in your data. But the challenge is to turn your data into actual information ... that you can act on. WA Police has a fascinating data story - business intelligence is being used to build a picture of crime over time, and put in place measures to reduce societal impact (read more here). 

Under the analytics covers, of course is the data. SAS CMO Jim Davis told us that an organisation’s critical asset is its data and more people need access. Actually, a great insight from our CEO Jim Goodnight was that the SAS Visual Analytics software is a first step to handling your big data, and driving the power of fact-based decision-making. Big Data is not the size (can you imagine some of the tweets after that comment from Jim Davis?) it’s data that has exceeded the processing capacity of conventional database management solutions. With SAS you can process billions of rows of data in a couple of seconds, but analytics is about more than just pretty graphs, and Jim (Davis) talked us through where SAS sits in the analytics quadrant – “Quadrants aren’t just for Forrester” he said to much laughter.

So after a full day of analytics and data, I was ready for what I thought might be some nice colouring in style sessions at ADMA (I am of course, kidding!). The ADMA line up this year was quite different and reflects the organisation’s change in direction from direct mail to data-driven marketing. I couldn’t wait to hear Rayid Ghani, Chief Scientist from the Obama campaign and I was not disappointed. Analytics was critical to Obama’s election - from fundraising to getting the voters out the door to getting the vote. The constant test and optimization process that he talked about was a lesson for all marketers. The campaign didn’t want to spend any more than was absolutely necessary to win 51% of the votes in each state (because of the election/voting system – it would never work in Australia that way). We talk about the 'segment of one' and from what I was hearing, it was almost a 'campaign of one'.

We then heard from Dr Nicola Millard, futurologist with British Telecom (BT) and her ideas and research projects on the tech-savvy customers which was later borne out by research projects from Australia's largest telco, Telstra. Liz Moore, Head of Customer Insights & Analytics gave a compelling presentation on how five megatrends are informing Telstra’s infrastructure and platform development. My personal favourite was 'taking care of myself', and the whole movement around ‘life tracking’, using the data that we generate via devices like the Fitbit or Nike Fuel band, to make positive changes on our lifestyle. One day I’ll tell you about how I’ve used analytics to reduce insomnia episodes by analysing my life data.

There was much more to both of these days than I can possibly cover off here, and I invite you to download the presentations from SAS Forum for even more nuggets of gold.

Learn more - Download presentations from SAS Forum 2013.

tags: customer intelligence, Data, data visualisation, marketing
8月 152013
 
At SAS Forum Sydney 2013, Dr Jim Goodnight SAS CEO opens the session

Dr Jim Goodnight SAS CEO at SAS Forum Sydney 2013

This week Sydney played host to two conferences that for me, underpinned the theme of analytics everywhere that my colleague Vincent Cotte noted about SAS Global Forum. First on my agenda was SAS Forum Sydney 2013, where over 1,000 people gathered to hear from leaders in the analytics space, including SAS customers and staff. You can recap the agenda over there, or download the presentations over here.

First up, I'll cover off some of the more salient takeaways from SAS Forum for marketers. If you’re in marketing, you can’t have missed the change from colouring in to data-driven marketing. Do you have an Emergent CMO? One who understands the new art and science of marketing? Or are you still looking to IT to solve your problems?

Michael Pascoe, journalist, opened the event with the bold statement “Australia does not have a budget problem” and that set the tone for the day – spend! Use what you know to make it count, be more creative and use your intelligence. More telling, and also what became a theme for the day was the data story.  David Bowie, the Managing Director of SAS Australia, really brought this home with his statement that it’s not enough to just think about your customers, you need to think like your customers - what story are they telling you through their data? And are you listening?

At SAS, we know analytics is the key to actually doing this and we pay more than lip service to the idea of customer-centricity. We recently released this story of how we are drinking our own champagne and using the SAS customer intelligence suite  to build a full picture of the customer interaction leading to dramatic increases in response rates.

Back to SAS Forum ... it was  a packed day of hearing just how our customers think like their customers – eye-opening to be sure. For instance, as a result of better customer insights achieved through its data analytics initiative, KnowMe, Westpac Bank is achieving a 40 per cent uptake on customer offers. Later at the ABO panel, David Mortimer went on to tell us that the customer is actually the one in power now. If you want to unlock that power, it’s in your data. But the challenge is to turn your data into actual information ... that you can act on. WA Police has a fascinating data story - business intelligence is being used to build a picture of crime over time, and put in place measures to reduce societal impact (read more here). 

Under the analytics covers, of course is the data. SAS CMO Jim Davis told us that an organisation’s critical asset is its data and more people need access. Actually, a great insight from our CEO Jim Goodnight was that the SAS Visual Analytics software is a first step to handling your big data, and driving the power of fact-based decision-making. Big Data is not the size (can you imagine some of the tweets after that comment from Jim Davis?) it’s data that has exceeded the processing capacity of conventional database management solutions. With SAS you can process billions of rows of data in a couple of seconds, but analytics is about more than just pretty graphs, and Jim (Davis) talked us through where SAS sits in the analytics quadrant – “Quadrants aren’t just for Forrester” he said to much laughter.

So after a full day of analytics and data, I was ready for what I thought might be some nice colouring in style sessions at ADMA (I am of course, kidding!). The ADMA line up this year was quite different and reflects the organisation’s change in direction from direct mail to data-driven marketing. I couldn’t wait to hear Rayid Ghani, Chief Scientist from the Obama campaign and I was not disappointed. Analytics was critical to Obama’s election - from fundraising to getting the voters out the door to getting the vote. The constant test and optimization process that he talked about was a lesson for all marketers. The campaign didn’t want to spend any more than was absolutely necessary to win 51% of the votes in each state (because of the election/voting system – it would never work in Australia that way). We talk about the 'segment of one' and from what I was hearing, it was almost a 'campaign of one'.

We then heard from Dr Nicola Millard, futurologist with British Telecom (BT) and her ideas and research projects on the tech-savvy customers which was later borne out by research projects from Australia's largest telco, Telstra. Liz Moore, Head of Customer Insights & Analytics gave a compelling presentation on how five megatrends are informing Telstra’s infrastructure and platform development. My personal favourite was 'taking care of myself', and the whole movement around ‘life tracking’, using the data that we generate via devices like the Fitbit or Nike Fuel band, to make positive changes on our lifestyle. One day I’ll tell you about how I’ve used analytics to reduce insomnia episodes by analysing my life data.

There was much more to both of these days than I can possibly cover off here, and I invite you to download the presentations from SAS Forum for even more nuggets of gold.

Learn more - Download presentations from SAS Forum 2013.

tags: customer intelligence, Data, data visualisation, marketing
5月 242013
 
You had to be there … well, maybe you didn’t! Major industry events – conventions, trade shows, etc. – are the rock concerts of the corporate world. And similar to rock concerts, attendees get a memorable shared experience while their friends back home get, at best, a decent description or, [...]
5月 142013
 

I was privileged enough to have the opportunity to celebrate the coming of age of analytics with 4,200 SAS users in San Francisco last week.  It's clear that analytics is front and centre of strategic conversations in agencies and companies alike.  Check out the newspaper headlines, the explosion of events surrounding deriving big data value and of course we now have a Hollywood movie.  In the opening keynote, Oakland A’s General Manager, Billy Beane (played by Brad Pitt in the movie Moneyball)  made a couple of great observations about the emergence of analytics. Here are three that resonated with what I am seeing with local companies in Asia Pacific:

  • Organisations can no longer ignore the fact that numbers don’t lie.  Analytics is helping to identify trends and patterns to guide and implement more accurate and impactful decisions.
  • Leaders of the future will be numbers driven, be it sports, government or business.  Data is a key asset that needs to mined for value.
  • Once analytics is embraced to enhance one part of the business the competition will quickly catch up.  You must look to innovate and explore how analytics is used across the breadth of your business.

Ensuring our customers are at the forefront of analytical innovation SAS released a series of groundbreaking announcements.  SAS’ Chief Executive Officer, Jim Goodnight and Chief Marketing Officer, Jim Davis took to main stage, assisted by customers JP Morgan Chase and OfficeMax, to demonstrate some of our newer offerings followed by discussion of vision. There were three themes driving our vision; analytics for everyone, everywhere and in everything.  I have broken down the themes into the key capabilities they bring to market.

Analytics for everyone

  • SAS Visual Analytics next release will include  powerful new scenario analysis capabilities, adding prescriptive analytics to existing descriptive and predictive analytics, helping organisations rapidly and easily move to more advanced uses of analytics. SAS Visual Analytics will also support Windows 64-bit.
  • At no additional charge for the high-performance procedures, customers currently licensing products like SAS/STAT®, SAS Analytics Pro and SAS® Enterprise Miner™ will receive this new functionality when they upgrade their respective analytic products on the newly released platform for SAS Business Analytics 9.4.  Making it easier for existing customers to access the power of high-performance analytics while leveraging current hardware and software investments

Analytics everywhere

  • The June shipment of SAS 9.4 software is cloud ready allowing your IT team to meet requirements around security, authentication, scale and resiliency for private or public SAS cloud deployments.
  • Availability of SAS High Performance analytics procedures in your current environment allowing you to take advantage of the capabilities of High Performance Analytics everywhere.
  • SAS Web Editor, a Web-based tool for writing and running SAS code will require no local SAS software installation. Users simply connect to a website to access SAS code, files, projects and libraries, anytime and anywhere. SAS Web Editor supports multiple browsers including Safari, letting Mac users take full advantage of powerful SAS programming software capabilities. SAS Web Editor is available on iPads® that support iOS 6 or greater. Support for other tablets will follow.
  • SAS Visual Analytics continues to enhance mobile business intelligence with increased collaboration with annotation markups and sharing, integration with mobile device management. Having on-the-go access to current, relevant information means faster decision cycles as critical information is always available anytime, anywhere – on iPads or Android tablets.

Analytics in everything

  • The newly redesigned SAS® Customer Intelligence suite makes advanced analytics more accessible to all marketers to address today's challenges surrounding the effective management of customer relationships across channels, creation of meaningful customer experiences and making optimal decisions based on big data. Inside one application, marketers can plan, create and execute campaigns; optimise scenarios; and engage with customers across all channels. No longer will marketers have to manage work in disparate applications and interfaces.
  • SAS is increasing the value analytics delivers by extending focus from “data at rest” to “data in motion”. Fast-moving organisations are embracing real-time data streaming into their enterprises by performing relational, procedural and pattern-matching analysis of structured and unstructured data as it is received to provide immediate action and insight.  Event Stream Processing and Enterprise Decision Management filters out the noise analysing high-volumes of data and events in motion to drastically cut time to action.
  • SAS 9.4 provides access to numerous new features in our data management products, as well as enhanced Hadoop integration. Our goal is to decrease the time to value for SAS users while reducing the total cost of ownership for IT.

Subscribe to our blog to read Bill Gibson’s in depth breakdown of the key announcements from Global Forum 2013.

If you missed the action you can attend your local forums in the following countries.  Click here to check them out.

tags: analytics, cloud, customer intelligence, decision support, high performance analytics, Mobile BI, operationalisation
3月 152013
 

Each fall, SAS Customer Intellience (CI) customers gather at SAS global headquarters for the SAS CI Customer Connection. It's a great opportunity you to interact with your peers in other companies and to gain firsthand knowledge on how to make the most of your CI investment in three important ways:

  1. Much of the event is planned to give you many opportunities to share knowledge, network among each other and to participate in hands-on learning modules.
  2. During the event, it is all about CI. Take time to meet directly with experts from CI product management and R&D while on campus. The schedule is laid out to allow you to explore the possibilities of your current deployment, or take in-depth looks at new features in the works.
  3. We include industry analysts and thought leaders who can engage you in exploring concepts and strategies that will broaden your horizons well into the future.

Preparation for the event is already well under way, and we've already confirmed participation by Kim Collins, research VP at Gartner, and Christine Moorman of Duke University and Executive Director of the CMO Survey.

At this year's event, we'll add emphasis on exploring management of the customer experience. If you have a success story or best practice, there are still opportunities to present to the group if you'd be interested in speaking.

This year's event takes place during Sept. 17 - 18, 2013. Stand by for details soon about how to learn more and register for this tremendous opportunity.

tags: customer intelligence, events