Macro

2月 012021
 

Do you want to spend less time on the tedious task of preparing your data? I want to tell you about a magical and revolutionary SAS macro called %TK_codebook. Not only does this macro create an amazing codebook showcasing your data, it also automatically performs quality control checks on each variable. You will easily uncover potential problems lurking in your data including variables that have:

  • Incomplete formats
  • Out of range values
  • No variation in response values
  • Variables missing an assigned user-defined format
  • Variables that are missing labels

All you need is a SAS data set with labels and formats assigned to each variable and the accompanying format catalogue. Not only will this macro change the way you clean and prepare your data, but it also gives you an effortless way to evaluate the quality of data you obtain from others before you start your analysis. Look how easy it is to create a codebook if you have a SAS data set with labels and formats:

title height=12pt 'Master Codebook for Study A Preliminary Data';
title2 height=10pt 'Simulated Data for Participants in a Health Study';
title3 height=10pt 'Data simulated to include anomalies illustrating the power of %TK_codebook';
 
libname library "/Data_Detective/Formats/Blog_1_Codebooks";
 
%TK_codebook(lib=work,
	file1=STUDYA_PRELIM,
	fmtlib=LIBRARY,
	cb_type=RTF,
	cb_file=/Data_Detective/Book/Blog/SAS_Programs/My_Codebook.rtf,
	var_order=INTERNAL,
	organization = One record per CASEID,
	include_warn=YES;
run;

Six steps create your codebook

After creating titles for your codebook, this simple program provides %TK_codebook with the following instructions:

  1. Create a codebook for SAS data set STUDYA_PRELIM located in the temporary Work library automatically defined by SAS
  2. Find the formats assigned to the STUDYA_PRELIM in a format catalogue located in the folder assigned to the libref LIBRARY
  3. Write your codebook in a file named /Data_Detective/Book/Blog/SAS_Programs/My_Codebook.rtf
  4. List variables in the codebook by their INTERNAL order (order stored in the data set)
  5. Add “One record per CASEID” indicating which variable(s) uniquely identify each observation to codebook header
  6. Include reports identifying potential problems in the data

Just these few lines of code will create the unbelievably useful codebook shown below.

The data set used has many problems that can interfere with analysis. %TK_codebook creates reports showing a concise summary of only those problem variables needing close examination. These reports save you an incredible amount of time.

Using assigned formats, %TK_codebook identifies unexpected values occurring in each variable and provides a summary in the first two reports.

Values occurring outside those defined by the assigned format indicate two possible problems:

  1. A value was omitted from the format definition (Report 1 – Incomplete formats)
  2. The variable has unexpected values needing mitigation before the data is analyzed (Report 2 – Out of Range Value)

The next report lists numeric variables that have no variation in their values.

These variables need examining to uncover problems with preparing the data set.

The next two reports warn you about variables missing an assigned user-defined format. These variables will be excluded from screening for out-of-range values and incomplete format definitions.

The last report informs you about variables that are missing a label or have a label that matches the variable name.

It is easy to use %TK_codebook to resolve problems in your data and create an awesome codebook. Instead of spending your time preparing your data, you will be using your data to change the world!

Create your codebook

Download %TK_codebook from my author page, then learn to use it from my new book, The Data Detective’s Toolkit: Cutting-Edge Techniques and SAS Macros to Clean, Prepare, and Manage Data.

THE DATA DETECTIVE'S TOOLKIT | BUY IT NOW

Creating codebooks with SAS macros was published on SAS Users.

7月 142020
 

In my new book, End-to-End Data Science with SAS: A Hands-On Programming Guide, I use the 1.5 IQR rule to adjust multiple variables.  This program utilizes a macro that loops through a list of variables to make the necessary adjustments and creates an output data set.

One of the most popular ways to adjust for outliers is to use the 1.5 IQR rule. This rule is very straightforward and easy to understand. For any continuous variable, you can simply multiply the interquartile range by the number 1.5. You then add that number to the third quartile. Any values above that threshold are suspected as being an outlier. You can also perform the same calculation on the low end. You can subtract the value of IQR x 1.5 from the first quartile to find low-end outliers.

The process of adjusting for outliers can be tedious if you have several continuous variables that are suspected as having outliers. You will need to run PROC UNIVARIATE on each variable to identify its median, 25th percentile, 75th percentile, and interquartile range. You would then need to develop a program that identifies values above and below the 1.5 IQR rule thresholds and overwrite those values with new values at the threshold.

The following program is a bit complicated, but it automates the process of adjusting a list of continuous variables according to the 1.5 IQR rule. This program consists of three distinct parts:

    1. Create a BASE data set that excludes the variables contained in the &outliers global macro. Then create an OUTLIER data set that contains only the unique identifier ROW_NUM and the outlier variables.
    2. Create an algorithm that loops through each of the outlier variables contained in the global variable &outliers and apply the 1.5 IQR rule to cap each variable’s range according to its unique 1.5 IQR value.
    3. Merge the newly restricted outlier variable with the BASE data set.
/*Step 1: Create BASE and OUTLIER data sets*/
 
%let outliers = /*list of variables*/;
 
DATA MYDATA.BASE;
    SET MYDATA.LOAN_ADJUST (DROP=&outliers.);
    ROW_NUM = _N_;
RUN;
 
DATA outliers;
    SET MYDATA.LOAN_ADJUST (KEEP=&outliers. ROW_NUM);
    ROW_NUM = _N_;
RUN;
 
 /*Step 2: Create loop and apply the 1.5 IQR rule*/
 
%MACRO loopit(mylist);
    %LET n = %SYSFUNC(countw(&mylist));
 
    %DO I=1 %TO &n;
        %LET val = %SCAN(&mylist,&I);
 
        PROC UNIVARIATE DATA = outliers ;
            VAR &val.;
            OUTPUT OUT=boxStats MEDIAN=median QRANGE=iqr;
        run;
 
        data _NULL_;
           SET boxStats;
           CALL symput ('median',median);
           CALL symput ('iqr', iqr);
        run;
 
        %PUT &median;
        %PUT &iqr;
 
        DATA out_&val.(KEEP=ROW_NUM &val.);
        SET outliers;
 
       IF &val. ge &median + 1.5 * &iqr THEN
           &val. = &median + 1.5 * &iqr;
       RUN;
 
/*Step 3: Merge restricted value to BASE data set*/
 
       PROC SQL;
           CREATE TABLE MYDATA.BASE AS
               SELECT *
               FROM MYDATA.BASE AS a
               LEFT JOIN out_&val. as b
                   on a.ROW_NUM = b.ROW_NUM;
       QUIT;
 
    %END;
%MEND;
 
%LET list = &outliers;
%loopit(&list);

Notes on the outlier adjustment program:

  • A macro variable is created that contains all of the continuous variables that are suspected of having outliers.
  • Separate data sets were created: one that contains all of the outlier variables and one that excludes the outlier variables.
  • A macro program is developed to contain the process of looping through the list of variables.
  • A macro variable (n) is created that counts the number of variables contained in the macro variable.
  • A DO loop is created that starts at the first variable and runs the following program on each variable contained in the macro variable.
  • PROC UNIVARIATE identifies the variable’s median and interquartile range.
  • A macro variable is created to contain the values of the median and interquartile range.
  • A DATA step is created to adjust any values that exceed the 1.5 IQR rule on the high end and the low end.
  • PROC SQL adds the adjusted variables to the BASE data set.

This program might seem like overkill to you. It could be easier to simply adjust outlier variables one at a time. This is often the case; however, when you have a large number of outlier variables, it is often beneficial to create an algorithm to transform them efficiently and consistently

Adjusting outliers with the 1.5 IQR rule was published on SAS Users.

2月 052020
 

One of the first and most important steps in analyzing data, whether for descriptive or inferential statistical tasks, is to check for possible errors in your data. In my book, Cody's Data Cleaning Techniques Using SAS, Third Edition, I describe a macro called %Auto_Outliers. This macro allows you to search for possible data errors in one or more variables with a simple macro call.

Example Statistics

To demonstrate how useful and necessary it is to check your data before starting your analysis, take a look at the statistics on heart rate from a data set called Patients (in the Clean library) that contains an ID variable (Patno) and another variable representing heart rate (HR). This is one of the data sets I used in my book to demonstrate data cleaning techniques. Here is output from PROC MEANS:

The mean of 79 seems a bit high for normal adults, but the standard deviation is clearly too large. As you will see later in the example, there was one person with a heart rate of 90.0 but the value was entered as 900 by mistake (shown as the maximum value in the output). A severe outlier can have a strong effect on the mean but an even stronger effect on the standard deviation. If you recall, one step in computing a standard deviation is to subtract each value from the mean and square that difference. This causes an outlier to have a huge effect on the standard deviation.

Macro

Let's run the %Auto_Outliers macro on this data set to check for possible outliers (that may or may not be errors).

Here is the call:

%Auto_Outliers(Dsn=Clean.Patients,
               Id=Patno,
               Var_List=HR SBP DBP,
               Trim=.1,
               N_Sd=2.5)

This macro call is looking for possible errors in three variables (HR, SBP, and DBP); however, we will only look at HR for this example. Setting the value of Trim equal to .1 specifies that you want to remove the top and bottom 10% of the data values before computing the mean and standard deviation. The value of N_Sd (number of standard deviations) specifies that you want to list any heart rate beyond 2.5 trimmed standard deviations from the mean.

Result

Here is the result:

After checking every value, it turned out that every value except the one for patient 003 (HR = 56) was a data error. Let's see the mean and standard deviation after these data points are removed.

Notice the Mean is now 71.3 and the standard deviation is 11.5. You can see why it so important to check your data before performing any analysis.

You can download this macro and all the other macros in my data cleaning book by going to support.sas.com/cody. Scroll down to Cody's Data Cleaning Techniques Using SAS, and click on the link named "Example Code and Data." This will download a file containing all the programs, macros, and data files from the book.  By the way, you can do this with any of my books published by SAS Press, and it is FREE!

Let me know if you have questions in the comments section, and may your data always be clean! To learn more about SAS Press, check out up-and-coming titles, and to receive exclusive discounts make sure to subscribe to the newsletter.

Finding Possible Data Errors Using the %Auto_Outliers Macro was published on SAS Users.

4月 012019
 

dividing by zero with SAS

Whether you are a strong believer in the power of dividing by zero, agnostic, undecided, a supporter, denier or anything in between and beyond, this blog post will bring all to a common denominator.

History of injustice

For how many years have you been told that you cannot divide by zero, that dividing by zero is not possible, not allowed, prohibited? Let me guess: it’s your age minus 7 (± 2).

But have you ever been bothered by that unfair restriction? Think about it: all other numbers get to be divisors. All of them, including positive, negative, rational, even irrational and imaginary. Why such an injustice and inequality before the Law of Math?

We have our favorites like π, and prime members (I mean numbers), but zero is the bottom of the barrel, the lowest of the low, a pariah, an outcast, an untouchable when it comes to dividing by. It does not even have a sign in front of it. Well, it’s legal to have, but it’s meaningless.

And that’s not all. Besides not being allowed in a denominator, zeros are literally discriminated against beyond belief. How else could you characterize the fact that zeros are declared as pathological liars as their innocent value is equated to FALSE in logical expressions, while all other more privileged numbers represent TRUE, even the negative and irrational ones!

Extraordinary qualities of zeros

Despite their literal zero value, their informational value and qualities are not less than, and in many cases significantly surpass those of their siblings. In a sense, zero is a proverbial center of the universe, as all the other numbers dislocated around it as planets around the sun. It is not coincidental that zeros are denoted as circles, which makes them forerunners and likely ancestors of the glorified π.

Speaking of π, what is all the buzz around it? It’s irrational. It’s inferior to 0: it takes 2 π’s to just draw a single zero (remember O=2πR?). Besides, zeros are not just well rounded, they are perfectly rounded.

Privacy protection experts and GDPR enthusiasts love zeros. While other small numbers are required to be suppressed in published demographical reports, zeros may be shown prominently and proudly as they disclose no one’s personally identifiable information (PII).

No number rivals zero. Zeros are perfect numerators and equalizers. If you divide zero by any non-zero member of the digital community, the result will always be zero. Always, regardless of the status of that member. And yes, zeros are perfect common denominators, despite being prohibited from that role for centuries.

Zeros are the most digitally neutral and infinitely tolerant creatures. What other number has tolerated for so long such abuse and discrimination!

Enough is enough!

Dividing by zero opens new horizons

Can you imagine what new opportunities will arise if we break that centuries-old tradition and allow dividing by zero? What new horizons will open! What new breakthroughs and discoveries can be made!

With no more prejudice and prohibition of the division by zero, we can prove virtually anything we wish. For example, here is a short 5-step mathematical proof of “4=5”:

1)   4 – 4 = 10 – 10
2)   22 – 22 = 5·(2 – 2)
3)   (2 + 2)·(2 – 2) = 5·(2 – 2) /* here we divide both parts by (2 – 2), that is by 0 */
4)   (2 + 2) = 5
5)   4 = 5

Let’s make the next logical step. If dividing by zero can make any wish a reality, then producing a number of our choosing by dividing a given number by zero scientifically proves that division by zero is not only legitimate, but also feasible and practical.

As you will see below, division by zero is not that easy, but with the power of SAS, the power to know and the powers of curiosity, imagination and perseverance nothing is impossible.

Division by zero - SAS implementation

Consider the following use case. Say you think of a “secret” number, write it on a piece of paper and put in a “secret” box. Now, you take any number and divide it by zero. If the produced result – the quotient – is equal to your secret number, wouldn’t it effectively demonstrate the practicality and magic power of dividing by zero?

Here is how you can do it in SAS. A relatively “simple”, yet powerful SAS macro %DIV_BY_0 takes a single number as a numerator parameter, divides it by zero and returns the result equal to the one that is “hidden” in your “secret” box. It is the ultimate, pure artificial intelligence, beyond your wildest imagination.

All you need to do is to run this code:

 
data MY_SECRET_BOX;        /* you can use any dataset name here */
   MY_SECRET_NUMBER = 777; /* you can use any variable name here and assign any number to it */
run;
 
%macro DIV_BY_0(numerator);
 
   %if %sysevalf(&numerator=0) %then %do; %put 0:0=1; %return; %end;
   %else %let putn=&sysmacroname; 
   %let %sysfunc(putn(%substr(&putn,%length(&putn)),words.))=
   %sysevalf((&numerator/%sysfunc(constant(pi)))**&sysrc);  
   %let a=com; %let null=; %let nu11=%length(null); 
   %let com=*= This is going to be an awesome blast! ;
   %let %substr(&a,&zero,&zero)=*Close your eyes and open your mind, then;
   %let imagine = "large number like 71698486658278467069846772 Bytes divided by 0";
   %let O=%scan(%quote(&c),&zero+&nu11); 
   %let l=%scan(%quote(&c),&zero);
   %let _=%substr(%scan(&imagine,&zero+&nu11),&zero,&nu11);
   %let %substr(&a,&zero,&zero)%scan(&&&a,&nu11+&nu11-&zero)=%scan(&&&a,-&zero,!b)_;
   %do i=&zero %to %length(%scan(&imagine,&nu11)) %by &zero+&zero;
   %let null=&null%sysfunc(&_(%substr(%scan(&imagine,&nu11),&i,&zero+&zero))); %end;
   %if &zero %then %let _0=%scan(&null,&zero+&zero); %else;
   %if &nu11 %then %let _O=%scan(&null,&zero);
   %if %qsysfunc(&O(_&can)) %then %if %sysfunc(&_0(&zero)) %then %put; %else %put;
   %put &numerator:0=%sysfunc(&_O(&zero,&zero));
   %if %sysfunc(&l(&zero)) %then;
 
%mend DIV_BY_0;
 
%DIV_BY_0(55); /* parameter may be of any numeric value */

When you run this code, it will produce in the SAS LOG your secret number:

55:0=777

How is that possible without the magic of dividing by zero? Note that the %DIV_BY_0 macro has no knowledge of your dataset name, nor the variable name holding your secret number value to say nothing about your secret number itself.

That essentially proves that dividing by zero can practically solve any imaginary problem and make any wish or dream come true. Don’t you agree?

There is one limitation though. We had to make this sacrifice for the sake of numeric social justice. If you invoke the macro with the parameter of 0 value, it will return 0:0=1 – not your secret number - to make it consistent with the rest of non-zero numbers (no more exceptions!): “any number, except zero, divided by itself is 1”.

Challenge

Can you crack this code and explain how it does it? I encourage you to check it out and make sure it works as intended. Please share your thoughts and emotions in the Comments section below.

Disclosure

This SAS code contains no cookies, no artificial sweeteners, no saturated fats, no psychotropic drugs, no illicit substances or other ingredients detrimental to your health and integrity, and no political or religious statements. It does not collect, distribute or sell your personal data, in full compliance with FERPA, HIPPA, GDPR and other privacy laws and regulations. It is provided “as is” without warranty and is free to use on any legal SAS installation. The whole purpose of this blog post and the accompanied SAS programming implementation is to entertain you while highlighting the power of SAS and human intelligence, and to fool around in the spirit of the date of this publication.

Dividing by zero with SAS was published on SAS Users.

4月 212018
 

Have you ever been working in the macro facility and needed a macro function, but you could not locate one that would achieve your task? With the %SYSFUNC macro function, you can access most SAS® functions. In this blog post, I demonstrate how %SYSFUNC can help in your programming needs when a macro function might not exist. I also illustrate the formatting feature that is built in to %SYSFUNC. %SYSFUNC also has a counterpart called %QSYSFUNC that masks the returned value, in case special characters are returned.
%SYSFUNC enables the execution of SAS functions and user-written functions, such as those created with the FCMP procedure. Within the DATA step, arguments to the functions require quotation marks, but because %SYSFUNC is a macro function, you do not enclose the arguments in quotation marks. The examples here demonstrate this.

%SYSFUNC has two possible arguments. The first argument is the SAS function, and the second argument (which is optional) is the format to be applied to the value returned from the function. Suppose you had a report and within the title you wanted to issue today’s date in word format:

   title "Today is %sysfunc(today(),worddate20.)";

The title appears like this:

   "Today is               July 4, 2018"

Because the date is right-justified, there are leading blanks before the date. In this case, you need to introduce another function to remove the blank spaces. Luckily %SYSFUNC enables the nesting of functions, but each function that you use must have its own associated %SYSFUNC. You can rewrite the above example by adding the STRIP function to remove any leading or trailing blanks in the value:

   title "Today is %sysfunc(strip(%sysfunc(today(),worddate20.)))";

The title now appears like this:

    "Today is July 4, 2018"

The important thing to notice is the use of two separate functions. Each function is contained within its own %SYSFUNC.

Suppose you had a macro variable that contained blank spaces and you wanted to remove them. There is no macro COMPRESS function that removes all blanks. However, with %SYSFUNC, you have access to one. Here is an example:

   %let list=a    b    c; 
   %put %sysfunc(compress(&list));

The value that is written to the log is as follows:

   abc

In this last example, I use %SYSFUNC to work with SAS functions where macro functions do not exist.

The example checks to see whether an external file is empty. It uses the following SAS functions: FILEEXIST, FILENAME, FOPEN, FREAD, FGET, and FCLOSE. There are other ways to accomplish this task, but this example illustrates the use of SAS functions within %SYSFUNC.

   %macro test(outf);
   %let filrf=myfile;
 
   /* The FILEEXIST function returns a 1 if the file exists; else, a 0
   is returned. The macro variable &OUTF resolves to the filename
   that is passed into the macro. This function is used to determine
   whether the file exists. In this case you want to find the file
   that is contained within &OUTF. Notice that there are no quotation
   marks around the argument, as you will see in all cases below. If
   the condition is false, the %ELSE portion is executed, and a
   message is written to the log stating that the file does not
   exist.*/
 
   %if %sysfunc(fileexist(&outf)) %then %do;
 
   /* The FILENAME function returns 0 if the operation was successful; 
   else, a nonzero is returned. This function can assign a fileref
   for the external file that is located in the &OUTF macro 
   variable. */
 
   %let rc=%sysfunc(filename(filrf,&outf));
 
   /* The FOPEN function returns 0 if the file could not be opened; 
   else, a nonzero is returned. This function is used to open the
   external file that is associated with the fileref from &FILRF. */
 
   %let fid=%sysfunc(fopen(&filrf));
 
   /* The %IF macro checks to see whether &FID has a value greater
   than zero, which means that the file opened successfully. If the
   condition is true, we begin to read the data in the file. */
 
   %if &fid > 0 %then %do;
 
   /* The FREAD function returns 0 if the read was successful; else, a
   nonzero is returned. This function is used to read a record from
   the file that is contained within &FID. */
 
   %let rc=%sysfunc(fread(&fid));
 
   /* The FGET function returns a 0 if the operation was successful. A
   returned value of -1 is issued if there are no more records
   available. This function is used to copy data from the file data 
   buffer and place it into the macro variable, specified as the
   second argument in the function. In this case, the macro variable
   is MYSTRING. */   
 
   %let rc=%sysfunc(fget(&fid,mystring));
 
   /* If the read was successful, the log will write out the value
   that is contained within &MYSTRING. If nothing is returned, the
   %ELSE portion is executed. */
 
   %if &rc = 0 %then %put &mystring;
   %else %put file is empty;
 
   /* The FCLOSE function returns a 0 if the operation was successful;
   else, a nonzero value is returned. This function is used to close
   the file that was referenced in the FOPEN function. */
 
   %let rc=%sysfunc(fclose(&fid));
   %end;
 
   /* The FILENAME function is used here to deassign the fileref 
   FILRF. */
 
   %let rc=%sysfunc(filename(filrf));
   %end;
   %else %put file does not exist;
   %mend test;
   %test(c:\testfile.txt)

There are times when the value that is returned from the function used with %SYSFUNC contains special characters. Those characters then need to be masked. This can be done easily by using %SYSFUNC’s counterpart, %QSYSFUNC. Suppose we run the following example:

   %macro test(dte);
   %put &dte;
   %mend test;
 
   %test(%sysfunc(today(), worddate20.))

The above code would generate an error in the log, similar to the following:

   1  %macro test(dte);
   2  %put &dte;
   3  %mend test;
   4
   5  %test(%sysfunc(today(), worddate20.))
   MLOGIC(TEST):  Beginning execution.
   MLOGIC(TEST):  Parameter DTE has value July 20
   ERROR: More positional parameters found than defined.
   MLOGIC(TEST):  Ending execution.

The WORDDATE format would return the value like this: July 20, 2017. The comma, to a parameter list, represents a delimiter, so this macro call is pushing two positional parameters. However, the definition contains only one positional parameter. Therefore, an error is generated. To correct this problem, you can rewrite the macro invocation in the following way:

   %test(%qsysfunc(today(), worddate20.))

The %QSYSFUNC macro function masks the comma in the returned value so that it is seen as text rather than as a delimiter.

For a list of the functions that are not available with %SYSFUNC, see the “How to expand the number of available SAS functions within the macro language was published on SAS Users.

10月 172017
 

Would you like to format your macro variables in SAS? Good news. It's easy!  Just use the %FORMAT function, like this: %let x=1111; Log %put %format(&x,dollar11.); $1,111 %put %format(&x,roman.); MCXI %put %format(&x,worddate.); January 16, 1963   %let today=%sysfunc(today()); %put %format(&today,worddate.); October 13, 2017   %put %format(Macro,$3.); Mac What?!  You never [...]

The post How to format a macro variable appeared first on SAS Learning Post.

8月 212017
 

The stored compiled macro facility enables you to compile and save your macro definition in a permanent catalog in a library that you specify. The macro is compiled only once. When you call the macro in the current and subsequent SAS® sessions, SAS executes the compiled code from the macro catalog that you created when you compiled the macro.

The stored compiled facility has two main purposes. The first is that it enables your code to run faster because the macro code does not need to be compiled each time it is executed. The second purpose is to help you protect your code. Sometimes you need to share code that you’ve written with other users, but you do not want them to be able to see the code that is being executed. The stored compiled macro facility enables you to share the program without revealing the code. Compiling the macro with the SECURE option prevents the output of the SYMBOLGEN, MPRINT, and MLOGIC macro debugging options from being written to the log when the macro executes. This means that no code is written to the log when the code executes. After the macro has been compiled, there is no way to decompile it to retrieve the source code that created the catalog entry. This behavior prevents the user from being able to retrieve the code. However, it also prevents you from being able to recover the code.

It is very important to remember that there is no way to get back the code from a stored compiled macro. Because of this behavior, you should ALWAYS save your code when creating a stored compiled macro catalog. In order to update a stored compiled macro, you must recompile the macro. The only way to do this is to submit the macro definition again. Another important fact is that a stored compiled macro catalog can be used only on the same operating system and release of SAS that it was created on. So, in order to use a stored compiled macro on another operating system or release of SAS, that macro must be compiled in the new environment. Again, the only way to compile the macro is to resubmit the macro definition.

Save the Macro Source Code

To make it easier for you to save your code, the %MACRO statement contains the SOURCE option. When you create a stored compiled macro, the SOURCE option stores the macro definition as part of a catalog entry in the SASMACR catalog in the permanent SAS library listed on the SASMSTORE= system option.

Here is the syntax needed to create a stored compiled macro with the SOURCE option set:

libname mymacs 'c:\my macro library';   ❶                                                                                                
options mstored sasmstore=mymacs;       ❷                                                                                              
 
%macro test / store source;             ❸                                                                                                          
 
  libname mylib1 'path-to-my-first-library';                                                                                            
  libname mylib2 'path-to-my-second-library';                                                                                           
 
%mend;

 

❶ The LIBNAME statement points to the SAS library that will contain my stored compiled macro catalog.

❷ The MSTORED system option enables the stored compiled facility. The SASMSTORE= option points to the libref that points to the macro library.

❸ The STORE option instructs the macro processor to store the compiled version of TEST in the SASMACR catalog in the library listed in the SASMSTORE= system option. The SOURCE option stores the TEST macro definition in the same SASMACR catalog.

Note that the contents of the SASMACR catalog do not contain an entry for the macro source. The source has been combined with the macro entry that contains the compiled macro. To verify that the source has been saved, add the DES= option to the %MACRO statement. The DES= option enables you specify a description for the macro entry in the SASMACR catalog. So for example, you could add the following description when compiling the macro to indicate that the source code has been saved:

%macro test / store source des=’Source code saved with entry’;

 

You can look at the contents of the macro catalog using the CATALOG procedure:

proc catalog cat=a.sasmacr;                                                                                                            
contents;                                                                                                                               
run;                                                                                                                                    
quit;

 

You see the description indicating that the source code was saved with the macro entry in the output from PROC CATALOG:

Retrieve the Macro Source Code

When you need to update the macro or re-create the catalog on another machine, you can retrieve the macro source code using the %COPY statement. The %COPY statement enables you to retrieve the macro source code and write the code to a file. Here is the syntax:

%copy test / source outfile='c:\my macro library\test.sas';

 

This %COPY statement writes the source code for the TEST macro to the TEST.SAS file. Using TEST.SAS, you are now able to update the macro or compile the macro on another machine.

Remember, you should always save your source code when creating a stored compiled macro. Without the source code, you will not be able to update the macro or move the macro to a new environment.

Here are the relevant links for this article:

Always save your code when creating a stored compiled macro was published on SAS Users.

1月 032017
 

How many of you have been given a SAS data set with variables such as Age, Height, and Weight and some or all of them were stored as character values instead of numeric?  Probably EVERYONE! Yes, we all know how to do the old "swap and drop" (rename and convert), but […]

The post Character to Numeric Conversion in SAS appeared first on SAS Learning Post.

10月 212016
 

ProblemSolversHave you ever needed to run code based on the client application that you are using? Or have you needed to know the version of SAS® software that you are running and the operating system that you are running it on? This blog post describes a few automatic macro variables that can help with gathering this information.

Application Name

You can use the &_CLIENTAPP macro variable to obtain the name of the client application. Here are some details:

  • Referencing &_CLIENTAPP in SAS® Studio returns a value of SAS Studio
  • Referencing &_CLIENTAPP in SAS® Enterprise Guide® returns a value of ‘SAS Enterprise Guide
    Note: The quotation marks around SAS Enterprise Guide are part of the value.

Program Name

You can use the &SYSPROCESSNAME macro variable to obtain the name of the current SAS process. Here are some details:

  • Referencing &SYSPROCESSNAME interactively within the DMS window returns a value of DMS Process
  • Referencing &SYSPROCESSNAME in the SAS windowing environment of your second SAS session returns a value of DMS Process (2)
  • Referencing &SYSPROCESSNAME in SAS Enterprise Guide or SAS Studio returns a value of Object Server
  • Referencing &SYSPROCESSNAME in batch returns the word Program followed by the name of the program being run (for example: Program 'c:test.sas')
    Note: For information about other techniques for retrieving the program name, see SAS Note 24301: “How to retrieve the program name that is currently running in batch mode or interactively.”

Example

The following code illustrates how you can use both of these macro variables to check which client application you are using and display a message in the SAS log based on that result:

%macro check;
 
  %if %symexist(_clientapp) %then %do;
   %if &_clientapp = SAS Studio %then %do;
    %put Running SAS Studio;
   %end;
   %else %if &_clientapp= 'SAS Enterprise Guide' %then %do;
    %put Running SAS Enterprise Guide; 
   %end;
  %end;
 
  %else %if %index(&sysprocessname,DMS) %then %do;
    %put Running in Display Manager;
  %end;
  %else %if %index(&sysprocessname,Program) %then %do;
     %let prog=%qscan(%superq(sysprocessname),2,%str( ));
     %put Running in batch and the program running is &prog;
  %end;
 
  %mend check;
 %check

SAS Session Run Mode or Server Type

Another helpful SAS read-only automatic macro variable is &SYSPROCESSMODE. You can use &SYSPROCESSMODE to obtain the current SAS session run mode or server type name. Here is a list of possible values:

• SAS Batch Mode

• SAS/CONNECT Session 

• SAS DMS Session

• SAS IntrNet Server

• SAS Line Mode

• SAS Metadata Server

• SAS OLAP Server

• SAS Pooled Workspace Server

• SAS Share Server

• SAS Stored Process Server

• SAS Table Server

• SAS Workspace Server

Operating System and Version of SAS

Having the information detailed above is helpful, but you might also need to know the operating system and exact version of SAS that you are running. The following macro variables help with obtaining this information.

You can use &SYSSCP and &SYSSCPL to obtain an abbreviation of the name of your operating system.  Here are some examples:

macrovariables

For a complete list of values, see the “SYSSCP and SYSSCPL Automatic Macro Variables” section of SAS® 9.4 Macro Language: Reference, Fourth Edition.

SAS Release

&SYSVLONG4 is the most informative of the macro variables that provide SAS release information. You can use it to obtain the release number and maintenance level of SAS as well as a four-digit year. Here is an example:

%put &sysvlong4;

This code would print something similar to the following in the log:

9.04.01M3D06292015

Here is what this output means:

SAS release: 9.04.01

Maintenance level: M3

Ship Event date: D06292015

I hope that some of the tools described above are useful to you for obtaining information about your SAS environment. If you have any questions, please contact SAS Technical Support, and we will be happy to assist you. Thank you for using SAS!

tags: macro, Problem Solvers, SAS Macro, SAS Programmers

Macro variables that provide information about your SAS® environment was published on SAS Users.

12月 222015
 

The English language, a mishmash of words from many tongues and with rules that aren’t always consistent, sometimes causes people to stumble when writing quotes. There are numerous humorous websites with examples of incorrectly-used quotes on signs saying things like “Sandwiches Prepared ‘Fresh’,” or “Help ‘Wanted’ – Please ‘inquire’ within”. […]

The post Quote confusion: How do quotes and macro work together? appeared first on SAS Learning Post.