omnichannel

3月 152017
 

Omnichannel Analytics are helping companies uncover patterns in big data to improve the customer experience.  Using those insights, companies can anticipate what consumers are planning to purchase and influence that purchase in real time.     Companies are experiencing unprecedented complexity as they look for growth and market opportunities. Their product portfolios are [...]

Omnichannel is changing the way we view demand planning was published on SAS Voices by Charlie Chase

3月 152017
 

Omnichannel Analytics are helping companies uncover patterns in big data to improve the customer experience.  Using those insights, companies can anticipate what consumers are planning to purchase and influence that purchase in real time.     Companies are experiencing unprecedented complexity as they look for growth and market opportunities. Their product portfolios are [...]

Omnichannel is changing the way we view demand planning was published on SAS Voices by Charlie Chase

1月 112017
 

Omnichannel shoppers have been disrupting retailers for years, and its likely to top the industry’s agenda of challenges for years to come. But optimization, an omnichannel analytics technology, can help harness the positives of omnichannel retailing and minimize showrooming. Consider this everyday retail dilemma: E-commerce sales are growing, but in-store […]

Retailers use optimization to improve in-store fulfillment and keep customers satisfied was published on SAS Voices.

10月 032016
 

With today’s customers able to access rich sources of product and service information – especially pricing data – when they are mobile, retailers are being forced to innovate in the way they capture consumers’ attention. Unfortunately, attention spans are rapidly decreasing to just the few seconds that a user spends […]

Retailers, are you considering customer relevance and commercial relevance? was published on SAS Voices.

4月 222016
 

If nothing else you read puts your marketing efforts in perspective, this should:

It is not the employer who pays the wages. Employers only handle the money. It is the customer who pays the wages.

Henry Ford

Our customers deserve our respect. And I believe that, by and large, marketers treat their customers with the respect they deserve. But like with anything in life, creating happy customers only happens by making their experience relevant and satisfying – a complex task in an ever-changing environment.

That’s why SAS has introduced SAS Customer Intelligence 360 . It gives you the ability to integrate data from all of your customer touchpoints and share and gather customer intelligence across your entire organization (not just customer-facing departments).

One of the important modules of the new platform is SAS 360 Engage that does just what the name implies – helps you better engage with your customer by using analytical insights to make the right offers, faster.

Contextual marketing: Being in the moment with your customers

In the omnichannel world that marketers now inhabit, you know that you have to be hyper-alert at all times, or you miss an opportunity because you were too slow or make a misstep you’re not in a channel that your customer prefers.

The real power of SAS 360 Engage is in its ability to help you respond effectively to changes in customer behavior – say for example, the customer breaks a pattern of channel preference and moves to a different channel. You’ll be able to recognize behavior shifts and choose the best action for each interaction.

Personalizing, and even individualizing, the content that is placed on digital properties leads to higher engagement, loyalty and retention. It makes perfect sense. If customers see content that is relevant to them on a webpage or in a mobile app – they are much more likely to remain engaged – versus seeing generic content that is targeted to everyone. Targeting this “segment of one” increases uptake rates of offers and messages.

It's really the best of all possible worlds --  acquiring new customers while delighting existing customers --  using contextual customer engagement across digital channels and devices. Delivering a contextual offer allows you to boost new-customer acquisition rates and ultimately leads to a stronger, more profitable customer base and higher return on marketing investment.

Editor's note: This is an update of a post that originally appeared in April, 2016

How to provide contextual customer experiences was published on Customer Intelligence Blog.

4月 212016
 

Generating rich customer insights – the centerpiece of successful marketing efforts – is more arduous and crucial in today’s digitally saturated world. Brands must not only understand their customers across all touch points, but analyze and glean patterns from their behavior, and quickly respond to the faintest signs of changing preferences and needs.

 Our multi-screen world creates even more complexity for the marketer. A recent Nielsen study revealed that the typical US consumer now owns four digital devices, and spends 60 hours a week consuming content across devices.

Plus, a majority of US households now own web-connected televisions, computers and smartphones. Amidst all these digital devices, consumers also have numerous choices for how and when they access and engage with that content as part of their customer journey.

Smoother customer journeys, not fragmented hops

Given the growing number of digital touch points where customers now interact with companies, marketing often can’t do what’s needed all on its own. Many brands typically think of customers (and the insights gleaned from them) as being “owned” by particular function – marketing owns brand management; service 483134143owns support; sales owns customer relationships; retail operations own the in-store experience, etc.

As a result, the customer data and corresponding insights are fragmented across these functions. When businesses can’t effectively combine customer insights across multiple digital channels, let alone across multiple customer-facing functions, marketers are less confident about their efforts.

This is why brands must have effective technologies and processes in place so they do not lose track when charting, designing and measuring the customer journey. Whether customers are browsing your brand website, completing a purchase on your mobile app or talking with a service representative via online chat, customers demand to be recognized and treated consistently no matter the channel.

Broader, deeper customer knowledge

To this end, SAS 360 Discover goes beyond channel-level data to collect detailed customer-level data for deeper customer understanding and better marketing decisions. SAS 360 Discover is part of the new SAS Customer Intelligence 360 suite that can help you create a new level of customer experience.

Now, you can go beyond page views and clicks to knowing why customers behave as they do on your digital properties, what are the characteristics of your most profitable customers and which digital interactions successfully resulted in loyal, profitable relationships?

In today’s marketing environment, brands gain a competitive edge if they stop perceiving customer engagement as a series of discrete interactions and instead see it as customers do: a set of interrelated interactions that, when combined, make up the customer experience.

 

tags: customer data, customer experience, digital marketing, omnichannel, SAS 360 Discover, SAS Customer Intelligence 360

SAS 360 Discover: Elevating the role of customer insights for confident digital marketing was published on Customer Intelligence.

2月 172015
 
The SAS Booth at Retail's Big Show

The SAS Booth at Retail's Big Show

Omnichannel, Internet of Things and customer loyalty were just three of the terms you heard over and over again on the conference floor and in presentations at retail's biggest conference last month. If you had to miss the Retail Big Show in New York City, the article "Retail's Omnichannel, Data-Driven Revolution is Here" from CMSwire nicely sums up the main themes of the conference. Here's an excerpt:

“Praise the Lord,” that was our response when Alan Lipson, the global industry marketing manager for retail at SAS, said, “Smart retailers see that not every touch needs to lead to a sale. Sometimes the customer’s goals are more related to utility or convenience, and using data to help them accomplish those goals will increase customer loyalty in the long run."

We’re going to literally make note of it and hand it to the next salesperson or pop-up window that stalks us.

“The value is in the visit, not just the sale,” insisted Lipson. And if anyone has the analytics to prove it, it’s SAS.

Virginia Gibbons, the author of the article, reached out to Lipson after the conference to get his thoughts on the energy, topics and freebies at the SAS booth. Keep reading for the full interview between Gibbons and Lipson.

Was Big Data and Analytics a big deal at NRF’s BIG show?

Alan Lipson: Yes, between the continued growth of omnichannel data and the coming onslaught of data from Internet of Things, big data and analytics were bigger than ever at NRF this year.

What were attendees interested in?

Lipson: I saw a renewed interest in customer experience and customer loyalty, with a real shift taking place in the way retailers are approaching omnichannel. Smart retailers see that not every touch needs to lead to a sale. Sometimes the customer’s goals are more related to utility or convenience, and using data to help them accomplish those goals will increase customer loyalty in the long run.

 Did you present or moderate a panel? If so, what was the topic? Were there any reactions that surprised you?

Lipson: SAS sponsored two Big Ideas sessions. The first featured a Macys.com executive discussing customer engagement and cross-channel analytics. The enthusiasm of the standing-room only crowd was fantastic, and pointed out that retailers are still searching for the best way to understand and delight customers. The other session was a lively panel discussion among executives from eBay, Brooks Brothers and Chico’s. They talked about their experiences with loyalty marketing and the big data analytics needed to better engage with customers across all channels.

What was the most interesting topic at the conference?

Lipson: The Internet of Things, for sure. There is so much opportunity here to get convenience and optimization right with streaming data, but also a lot of risk for over reach and frivolous features. It will take some smart planning for retailers to get that balance right and develop options for consumers that are seamless and beneficial.

 If you had a booth, what did you give away or raffle?

Lipson: We gave away copies of Jill Dyché’s new book, The New IT: How Technology Leaders are Enabling Business Strategy in the Digital Age, just released by McGraw-Hill. Jill is VP of Best Practices at SAS and a long-time consultant to businesses around the globe. She notes in her blog, “My current focus is getting IT and business organizations to collaborate more effectively and not kill each other.” A laudable goal. In her book, she covers innovation, the evolving role of the CIO and the trend towards digital business.

tags: #NRF15, analytics, big data, customer loyalty, Internet of Things, omnichannel, retail
2月 102015
 

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Think about what makes you shop at the same place over and over again. Is it attention to detail or the fact that you're always remembered? What makes a good customer experience, regardless of channel?

Darren Stoll, Group Vice President of Marketing at Macys.com recommends these three guidelines for retailers:

  1. Think about the customer, not the channel. “Customer centricity demands omnichannel thinking,” says Stoll.
  2. Shop her way. “Frame everything around what she loves and what experience she expects,” says Stoll.
  3. Use a strategic + tactical customer lens. “If I know the customer has activities they want to accomplish, I know what I need to produce to guide and inform her visit,” says Stoll.

Stoll discussed the omnichannel strategy for Macys.com at The Retail Big Show in New York City last month.

“There’s tremendous power in having all this information about how a customer interacts with us,” he said. “But it’s still early days.” Capturing data and figuring out how to best leverage that data to improve the customer experience will only continue to grow in importance for retailers.

Learn more about the different expectations shoppers have for different channels and find out what data points alone can change the way you think about smartphone activity by reading the full article, "The value is in the visit, not just the sale."

tags: #NRF15, customer experience, omnichannel, retail
11月 102014
 
I love Christmas, but there is one thing I never seem to get right: the office Secret Santa. Every year I draw someone I’ve barely met and fruitlessly dig around for clues – only to find myself hastily wrapping a scented candle/novelty mug at the eleventh hour. Merry Christmas Sandra […]