papers & presentations

6月 022018
 

The SAS PlatformFor software users and SAS administrators, the question often becomes how to streamline their approach into the easiest to use system that most effectively completes the task at hand. At SAS Global Forum 2018, the topic of a “Big Red Button” was an idea that got audience members asking – is there a way to have just a few clicks complete all the stages of the software administration lifecycle? In this article, we review Sergey Iglov’s SAS Global Forum paper A ‘Big Red Button’ for SAS Administrators: Myth or Reality?” to get a better understanding of what this could look like, and how it could change administrators’ jobs for the better. Iglov is a director at SASIT Limited.

What is a “Big Red Button?”

With the many different ways the SAS Platform can be utilized, there is a question as to whether there is a single process that can control “infrastructure provisioning, software installation and configuration, maintenance, and decommissioning.” It has been believed that each of these steps has a different process; however, as Iglov concluded, there may be a way to integrate these steps together with the “Big Red Button.”

This mystery “button” that Iglov talked about would allow administrators to easily add or delete parts of the system and automate changes throughout; thus, the entire program could adapt to the administrator’s needs with a simple click.

Software as a System –SAS Viya and cloud based technologies

Right now, SAS Viya is compatible with the automation of software deployment processes through a centralized management. Right now, SAS Viya is compatible with a centralized automated deployment process. Through insights easily created and shared on the cloud, SAS Viya stands out, as users can access a centrally hosted control panel instead of needing individual installations.

Using CloudFormation by Amazon Web Services

At this point, the “Big Red Button” points toward systems such as CloudFormation. CloudFormation allows users of Amazon Web Services to lay out the infrastructure needed for their product visually, and easily make changes that will affect the software. As Iglov said, “Once a template is deployed using CloudFormation it can be used as a stack to simplify resources management. For example, when a stack is deleted all related resources are deleted automatically as well.”

Conclusion

Connecting to SAS Viya, CloudFormation can install and configure the system, and make changes. This would help SAS administrators adapt the product to their needs, in order to derive intelligence from data. While the future potential to use a one-click button is out there for many different platforms, using cloud based software and programs such as CloudFormation enable users to go through each step of SAS Platform’s administration lifecycle efficiently and effectively.

Additional Resources

SAS Viya Brochure
Sergey Iglov: "A 'Big Red Button' for SAS administrators: Myth or Reality?"

Additional SAS Global Forum 2018 talks of interest for SAS Administrators

A Programming Approach to Implementing SAS® Metadata-Bound Libraries for SAS® Data Set Encryption Deepali Rai, SAS Institute Inc.

Command-Line Administration in SAS® Viya®
Danny Hamrick, SAS

External Databases: Tools for the SAS® Administrator
Mathieu Gaouette, Prospective MG inc.

SAS® Environment Manager – A SAS® Viya® Administrator’s Swiss Army Knife
Michelle Ryals, Trevor Nightingale, SAS Institute Inc.

Troubleshooting your SAS® Grid Environment
Jason Hawkins, Amadeus Software Limited

Multi-Factor Authentication with SAS® and Symantec VIP
Jody Steadman, Mike Roda, SAS Institute Inc.

OpenID Connect Opens the Door to SAS® Viya® APIs
Mike Roda, SAS Institute Inc.

Understanding Security for SAS® Visual Analytics 8.2 on SAS® Viya®
Antonio Gianni, Faisal Qamar, SAS Institute Inc.

Latest and Greatest: Best Practices for Migrating to SAS® 9.4
Alec Fernandez, Leigh Fernandez, SAS Institute Inc.

Planning for Migration from SAS® 9.4 to SAS® Viya®
Don B. Hayes, DLL Consulting Inc.; Spencer Hayes, Cached Consulting LLC; Michael Shealy, Cached Consulting LLC; Rebecca Hayes, Green Peach Consulting Inc.

SAS® Viya®: Architect for High Availability Now and Users Will Thank You Later
Jerry Read, SAS Institute Inc.

Taming Change: Bulk Upgrading SAS® 9.4 Environments to a New Maintenance Release
Javor Evstatiev, Andrey Turlov

Is there a “Big Red Button” to use The SAS Platform? was published on SAS Users.

5月 302018
 

SAS Enterprise Miner has been a leader in data mining and modeling for over 20 years. The system offers over 80 different nodes that help users analyze, score and model their data. With a wide range of functionalities, there can be a number of different ways to produce the results you want.

At SAS® Global Forum 2018, Principal Systems Engineer Melodie Rush spoke about her experience with SAS® Enterprise Miner™, and compiled a list of hints that she believe will help users of all levels. This article previews her full presentation, Top 10 Tips for SAS Enterprise Miner Based on 20 Years’ Experience. The paper includes images and further details of each of the tips noted below; I’d encourage you to check it out to learn more.

Top Ten Tips for Enterprise Miner

Tip 1: How to find the node you’re looking for

If you struggle finding the node that best fits what you need, there’s a system that can simplify it.

Nodes are organized by Sample, Explore, Modify, Model, and Assess. Find which of these best describes what you are trying to do, and scroll across each node alphabetically for a description.

Tip 2: Add node from diagram workspace

Double click any node on the toolbar to see its properties. An example of the results this presents are shown below:

Top Ten Tips for Enterprise Miner

Tip 3: Clone a process flow

Highlight process flow by dragging your mouse across, right-click or CTRL+C, and Paste or CTRL+V where you want to insert process flow.

Tip 4: New features

  • There’s a new tab, HPDM (High-Performance Data Mining), which contains several new nodes that cover data mining and machine learning algorithms.
  • There are two new nodes under Utility that incorporate Open Source and SAS Viya.
  • The Open Source Integration node allows you to use R language code in SAS Enterprise Miner diagrams.
  • A SAS Viya Code node now incorporates code that will be used in SAS Viya and CAS, and algorithms from SAS Visual Data Mining and Machine Learning.
  • To save and share your results, there are now the Register Model and Save Data nodes under Utility.
  • You can now register models to the SAS Metadata Server to score or compare easily.
  • A Save Data node lets you save training, validation, test, score, or transaction data as SAS, JMP, Excel, CSV or tab-delimited files.

Tip 5: The unknown node

The reporter node under Utility allows you to easily document your Enterprise Miner process flow diagrams. A .pdf or .rtf is created with an image of the process flow.

Tip 6: The node that changes everything

The Metadata node, on the Utility tab, allows you to change metadata information and values in your diagram. You also can capture settings to then apply to data in another diagram.

Tip 7: How to generate a scorecard

A scorecard emphasizes what variables and values from your model are important. Values are reported on a 0 to 1,000 scale, with the higher being more likely the event you’re measuring occurs. To do this, have the Reporter node follow a Score node, and then change the Nodes property to Summary under Reporter node properties.

Tip 8: How to override the 512 level limit

If faced with the error message, “Maximum target levels of 512 exceeded,” your input is resulting in more than 512 distinct results. To get around this, you need to change EM_TRAIN_MAXLEVELS to another value. To do so, either change the macro value in properties

or change the macro value in project start code.

Tip 9: Which variable selection method should I use?

Instead of choosing just one variable selection method, you can combine different ones such as Decision Trees, Forward, Chi-Square, and others. The results can be combined using different selection properties, such as None (no changes made from original metadata), Any (reject a variable if any previous variable selection nodes reject it), All (reject a variable if all of the previous variable selection nodes reject it), and Majority (reject a variable if the majority of the variable selection nodes reject it).

Tip 10: Interpreting neural network

Decision trees can be produced to interpret networks, by changing the Prediction variable to be your Target and the Target variable to be rejected.

Conclusion

With so many options to create models that best suit your preferences, these tips will help sharpen your focus and allow you to use SAS Enterprise Miner more efficiently and effectively. This presentation was one in a series of talks on Enterprise Miner tool presented at SAS® Global Forum 2018.

Additional Resources

SAS Enterprise Miner
SAS Enterprise Learning Tutorials
Getting Started With SAS Enterprise Miner Tutorial Videos

Additional SAS Enterprise Miner talks from Global Forum 2018

A Case Study of Mining Social Media Data for Disaster Relief: Hurricane Irma
Bogdan Gadidov, Linh Le, Analytics and Data Science Institute, Kennesaw State University

A Study of Modelling Approaches for Predicting Dropout in a Business College
Xuan Wang, Helmut Schneider, Louisiana State University

Analysis of Nokia Customer Tweets with SAS® Enterprise Miner™ and SAS® Sentiment Analysis Studio
Vaibhav Vanamala MS in Business Analytics, Oklahoma State University

Analysis of Unstructured Data: Topic Mining & Predictive Modeling using Text
Ravi Teja Allaparthi

Association Rule Mining of Polypharmacy Drug Utilization Patterns in Health Care Administrative Data Using SAS® Enterprise Miner™
Dingwei Dai, Chris Feudtner, The Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia

Bayesian Networks for Causal Analysis
Fei Wang and John Amrhein, McDougall Scientific Ltd.

Classifying and Predicting Spam Messages Using Text Mining in SAS® Enterprise Miner™
Mounika Kondamudi, Oklahoma State University

Image Classification Using SAS® Enterprise Miner 14.1

Model-Based Fiber Network Expansion Using SAS® Enterprise Miner™ and SAS® Visual Analytics
Nishant Sharma, Charter Communications

Monte Carlo K-Means Clustering SAS Enterprise Miner
Donald K. Wedding, PhD Director of Data Science Sprint Corporation

Retail Product Bundling – A new approach
Bruno Nogueira Carlos, Youman Mind Over Data

Using Market Basket Analysis in SAS® Enterprise MinerTM to Make Student Course Enrollment Recommendations
Shawn Hall, Aaron Osei, and Jeremiah McKinley, The University of Oklahoma

Using SAS® Enterprise Miner for Categorization of Customer Comments to Improve Services at USPS
Olayemi Olatunji, United States Postal Service Office of Inspector General

Top 10 tips for SAS Enterprise Miner based on 20 years’ experience was published on SAS Users.

5月 302018
 

SAS Enterprise Miner has been a leader in data mining and modeling for over 20 years. The system offers over 80 different nodes that help users analyze, score and model their data. With a wide range of functionalities, there can be a number of different ways to produce the results you want.

At SAS® Global Forum 2018, Principal Systems Engineer Melodie Rush spoke about her experience with SAS® Enterprise Miner™, and compiled a list of hints that she believe will help users of all levels. This article previews her full presentation, Top 10 Tips for SAS Enterprise Miner Based on 20 Years’ Experience. The paper includes images and further details of each of the tips noted below; I’d encourage you to check it out to learn more.

Top Ten Tips for Enterprise Miner

Tip 1: How to find the node you’re looking for

If you struggle finding the node that best fits what you need, there’s a system that can simplify it.

Nodes are organized by Sample, Explore, Modify, Model, and Assess. Find which of these best describes what you are trying to do, and scroll across each node alphabetically for a description.

Tip 2: Add node from diagram workspace

Double click any node on the toolbar to see its properties. An example of the results this presents are shown below:

Top Ten Tips for Enterprise Miner

Tip 3: Clone a process flow

Highlight process flow by dragging your mouse across, right-click or CTRL+C, and Paste or CTRL+V where you want to insert process flow.

Tip 4: New features

  • There’s a new tab, HPDM (High-Performance Data Mining), which contains several new nodes that cover data mining and machine learning algorithms.
  • There are two new nodes under Utility that incorporate Open Source and SAS Viya.
  • The Open Source Integration node allows you to use R language code in SAS Enterprise Miner diagrams.
  • A SAS Viya Code node now incorporates code that will be used in SAS Viya and CAS, and algorithms from SAS Visual Data Mining and Machine Learning.
  • To save and share your results, there are now the Register Model and Save Data nodes under Utility.
  • You can now register models to the SAS Metadata Server to score or compare easily.
  • A Save Data node lets you save training, validation, test, score, or transaction data as SAS, JMP, Excel, CSV or tab-delimited files.

Tip 5: The unknown node

The reporter node under Utility allows you to easily document your Enterprise Miner process flow diagrams. A .pdf or .rtf is created with an image of the process flow.

Tip 6: The node that changes everything

The Metadata node, on the Utility tab, allows you to change metadata information and values in your diagram. You also can capture settings to then apply to data in another diagram.

Tip 7: How to generate a scorecard

A scorecard emphasizes what variables and values from your model are important. Values are reported on a 0 to 1,000 scale, with the higher being more likely the event you’re measuring occurs. To do this, have the Reporter node follow a Score node, and then change the Nodes property to Summary under Reporter node properties.

Tip 8: How to override the 512 level limit

If faced with the error message, “Maximum target levels of 512 exceeded,” your input is resulting in more than 512 distinct results. To get around this, you need to change EM_TRAIN_MAXLEVELS to another value. To do so, either change the macro value in properties

or change the macro value in project start code.

Tip 9: Which variable selection method should I use?

Instead of choosing just one variable selection method, you can combine different ones such as Decision Trees, Forward, Chi-Square, and others. The results can be combined using different selection properties, such as None (no changes made from original metadata), Any (reject a variable if any previous variable selection nodes reject it), All (reject a variable if all of the previous variable selection nodes reject it), and Majority (reject a variable if the majority of the variable selection nodes reject it).

Tip 10: Interpreting neural network

Decision trees can be produced to interpret networks, by changing the Prediction variable to be your Target and the Target variable to be rejected.

Conclusion

With so many options to create models that best suit your preferences, these tips will help sharpen your focus and allow you to use SAS Enterprise Miner more efficiently and effectively. This presentation was one in a series of talks on Enterprise Miner tool presented at SAS® Global Forum 2018.

Additional Resources

SAS Enterprise Miner
SAS Enterprise Learning Tutorials
Getting Started With SAS Enterprise Miner Tutorial Videos

Additional SAS Enterprise Miner talks from Global Forum 2018

A Case Study of Mining Social Media Data for Disaster Relief: Hurricane Irma
Bogdan Gadidov, Linh Le, Analytics and Data Science Institute, Kennesaw State University

A Study of Modelling Approaches for Predicting Dropout in a Business College
Xuan Wang, Helmut Schneider, Louisiana State University

Analysis of Nokia Customer Tweets with SAS® Enterprise Miner™ and SAS® Sentiment Analysis Studio
Vaibhav Vanamala MS in Business Analytics, Oklahoma State University

Analysis of Unstructured Data: Topic Mining & Predictive Modeling using Text
Ravi Teja Allaparthi

Association Rule Mining of Polypharmacy Drug Utilization Patterns in Health Care Administrative Data Using SAS® Enterprise Miner™
Dingwei Dai, Chris Feudtner, The Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia

Bayesian Networks for Causal Analysis
Fei Wang and John Amrhein, McDougall Scientific Ltd.

Classifying and Predicting Spam Messages Using Text Mining in SAS® Enterprise Miner™
Mounika Kondamudi, Oklahoma State University

Image Classification Using SAS® Enterprise Miner 14.1

Model-Based Fiber Network Expansion Using SAS® Enterprise Miner™ and SAS® Visual Analytics
Nishant Sharma, Charter Communications

Monte Carlo K-Means Clustering SAS Enterprise Miner
Donald K. Wedding, PhD Director of Data Science Sprint Corporation

Retail Product Bundling – A new approach
Bruno Nogueira Carlos, Youman Mind Over Data

Using Market Basket Analysis in SAS® Enterprise MinerTM to Make Student Course Enrollment Recommendations
Shawn Hall, Aaron Osei, and Jeremiah McKinley, The University of Oklahoma

Using SAS® Enterprise Miner for Categorization of Customer Comments to Improve Services at USPS
Olayemi Olatunji, United States Postal Service Office of Inspector General

Top 10 tips for SAS Enterprise Miner based on 20 years’ experience was published on SAS Users.

2月 282018
 

Goutam Chakraborty is a busy man. In addition to serving as SAS professor of marketing analytics at Oklahoma State University, Dr. Chakraborty is the director and founder of the SAS and Oklahoma State University MS in Business Analytics and an award winning author and professor. He teaches courses in such areas as business analytics, marketing analytics, data mining, marketing research, and web strategy, and has been preparing students to enter the workforce with advanced skills in marketing and analytics for more than 20 years. Throw in the regular consulting engagements he has with some of the world's top companies and it makes you wonder if Dr. Chakraborty has time to add anything else to his already full plate. Well, this year at least, you add SAS Global Forum 2018 Chair to the list - likely at the expense of a good night's sleep.

As the largest gathering of SAS users in the world, SAS Global Forum will attract more than 5,000 SAS professionals for several days of learning and networking. Recently, I sat down with Dr. Chakraborty to talk with him a bit about this year's conference, which takes place April 8-11, 2018 in Denver. I left excited about SAS Global Forum 2018 and, at the expense of losing credibility as a fair and balanced reporter, convinced that Dr. Chakraborty is one of the nicest individuals you'll ever meet.

Larry LaRusso: I know you've been preparing to chair SAS Global Forum 2018 for more than three years, but now that the event is only a few weeks away, how excited are you to kick this thing off?
Goutam Chakraborty: More excited than you know Larry. I've participated in many SAS Global Forums, but serving as chair gives you the ability to influence every aspect of the event, from speaker and content selection to charity-related events and networking opportunities. It's been a wonderful opportunity to give back to the SAS user community, one I'll never forget.

LL: What excites you most about this year's event?
GC: There are so many new things about this year's conference, all geared toward providing an enriching experience for all SAS users. I'll mention three that immediately come to mind.

One thing we've tried to do well this year is connect industry with academics. While we'll have a full program of events and talks specifically geared toward students and professors, this year we'll emphasize partnerships with industries in a new way. I might be most excited about Sunday's Talent Connection. This event brings students and SAS professionals together to network, discuss career opportunities and share knowledge, research and partnership opportunities that might exist with each other. I anticipate it being a great success for both students and industry looking to connect with young analytical talent.

Another strong focus for us is career development and learning for SAS users at all levels. We'll have a full menu of traditional training and certification opportunities for data scientists, business and data analysts and SAS programmers, but we're also providing opportunities to build on soft-skills development, such as networking, analytical story-telling and much more. We'll also have an on-site Learning Lab, available for several hours each day, where users can explore more than 25 e-learning courses for free.

Finally, I'll mention our volunteer opportunities. We'll have several ways for users to give back, but I'm particularly excited about our STEM-related charity event. During meals and evening networking receptions, both Monday and Tuesday, attendees will have the opportunity to work with RAFT Colorado (Resource Area For Teaching), and build STEM-inspired teaching kits for local teachers to use in their classrooms. Each kit will repurpose educational items RAFT has collected and make them available to teachers as creative tools for teaching STEM – inspiring the next generation of thinkers, innovators, problem-solvers and creators. It's an extraordinary opportunity to impact local area children.

LL: Speaking of extraordinary, this year's conference theme is "Inspire the Extraordinary." What does that theme mean to you?
GC: It means never accept "good enough." I always tell my students to push for something above and beyond what's expected of them, to be extra-ordinary. We expect the same for this year's SAS Global Forum. Knowing the event like I do, I feel confident we're going to deliver a SAS Global Forum that surprises and delights our users in a way they didn't expect.

LL: We all know that one of the best things about SAS Global Forum is its incredible content. What can you tell us about the content you’re putting together for this year’s event?
GC: Thanks to tons of hard work and research from a lot of SAS users, we've selected fantastic content from renowned speakers from across the world. Perhaps the best part of our content planning this year is the variety. Topics range from deep hard-core programming to high-level strategic thinking about data and analytics. From sessions that will help you to develop yourself personally as a better human-being to learning about optimizing Monday night NFL schedule for best viewership to thinking strategically about data as a currency – there is something of value for everyone.

SAS Global Forum 2018LL: SAS Global Forum is likely to attract more than 5,000 data scientists, analytics professionals and business leaders. Every year it amazes me how many of those users are attending SAS Global Forum for the first time. What advice would you give first-timers?
GC: First piece of advice: Have a plan and build a personalized agenda so you don’t get overwhelmed by the large number of available sessions. Second, take every opportunity to engage and network with other attendees. One of the best things about this conference is how willing veteran SAS users (regulars at this conference) are to help and welcome newcomers. So, take advantage of it. If you are sitting down for breakfast or lunch, take the time to introduce yourself to people around you. You may be surprised where it could lead. I'd also encourage attendees to take time to visit the Quad. The Quad is a casual and interactive space where attendees can network with other SAS enthusiasts, view demos and visit with experts from SAS and our sponsors. And, last but not the least, have some fun! Attend the social events we have planned, especially the Kick Back Party at Mile High Stadium on Tuesday evening.

LL: As an academician, I know you’re passionate about learning? What additional learning opportunities, beyond the session talks, are available to attendees?
GC: There are so many learning opportunities at SAS Global Forum that it is mind-numbing. Of course, the 20 and 50 minute session talks are the main modes of content delivery, but there are also e-posters, table talks and super demos in the Quad. We'll also have dozens of pre-conference tutorials, post-conference training, and all the activity in the Learning Labs, including hands-on workshops and the ability to take individual e-learning courses.

LL: Given your personal interests, I know one of your goals for this year’s conference is to increase participation in the event for students and professors. Can you tell me a little more about the special events you have planned for this audience?
GC: For starters, SAS Global Forum is completely “free” for students! As long as you are a full-time enrolled student of an accredited, degree-granting academic institution you can attend free of charge. There are credit hour minimums that must be reached to be eligible, so I'd encourage students to visit the website for complete details.

Programmatically, we have the Sunday afternoon sessions entirely dedicated to academics. We have a fantastic academic keynote speaker, Temple Grandin from Colorado State University, and special training sessions for professors interested in teaching analytics at their universities. For students, we offer a number of opportunities to network and special courses, such as how to best use social media for networking while looking for a job, to help them make a successful transition from student to working professional. We also encourage students, and really anyone who has an interest, to attend the presentations students make as winners of the SAS Global Forum Student Symposium Student Symposium. Though closed now, the Symposium provides an opportunity for teams of two to four students and a faculty adviser to showcase their skills and compete with other teams in the application of SAS Analytics in solving a big data problem. This year, more than 60 teams entered; the top eight will present 20-minute talks during the event.

LL: Dr. Chakraborty, I've taken a lot of your time, but is there anything else you'd like to share with our readers?
GC: Actually, I'd like to thank the many volunteers who have helped put this conference together. From serving on our SAS Global Users Group Executive Board to helping evaluate and select talks, to serving in our Presenter Mentor Program, hundreds of users have invested their time to make this conference the best one yet. SAS Global Forum is truly a user's conference and we depend on the user community to plan, promote and execute so many tasks and activities related to the event. Though I can't call them out by name, I would be remiss if I didn't mention their contributions and take a minute to thank them.

LL: Well let's hope they're reading! Dr. Chakraborty, I want to thank you again for your time. I look forward to seeing you in Denver in April.

Visit the SAS Global Forum 2018 website for more information and to register. Conference Proceedings will be available shortly before the event begins.

Continue the conversation: Join our live Tweetchat, Wednesday, March 7, 2018

How are you inspiring the extraordinary?

The next analytics extraordinary use case is just waiting to be discovered. We believe that in the hands of lifelong learners, the future of data is unlimited, especially when education and business join forces. That is why we are warming up to SAS Global Forum 2018 in Denver with a tweetchat on Wednesday 7th March (simply search #SASchat or #SASGF). We kick off at 6pm CET, 5pm UK, noon ET and 9am Pacific. Will you join us? The discussion will kick off with the following questions, posed to our expert panel:

  • Why is there more interest in lifelong learning now?
  • How does lifelong learning contribute to the analytics economy?
  • What are your favorite examples of analytics in the not-for-profit sector?
  • How is the education sector influencing the development of citizen data scientists?
  • What trends do you see in the consumption of analytics?

A conversation with SAS Global Forum 2018 Chair Goutam Chakraborty was published on SAS Users.

2月 162018
 

pricing and promotionThe consumer packaged goods (CPG) and Retail industry are going through a period of significant change. Both retailers and manufacturers are struggling to find growth and improve profitability. One strategy is through consolidation - e.g., Kraft-Heinz, Keurig- Dr Pepper Snapple Group on the manufacturer side, as well as Safeway-Albertsons, Ahold-Delhaize, Walgreens-Rite Aid on the retailer side. The thinking here is that these mergers would lead to large operational efficiencies and focused growth strategies.

Another important lever to drive growth is pricing and promotion. Companies have realized the importance of getting the pricing right and running high-impact promotions in a highly competitive market. As consumer shop multiple channels and new retail formats begin to permeate (e.g., smaller format stores, new entrants such as Aldi and Lidl), the importance of price-promo continues to increase. Pricing and promotion have become the second largest item on CPG manufacturer’s P&L, after cost-of-goods. Similarly for retailers, price-promo decisions have become critical for growth, maybe even survival. This is manifested in the growth in investment focused on pricing and promotion decisions. In some cases this investment could be as much as 20-25% of net revenue of the company.

However, despite the heavy investment in price-promo, the impact of these decisions is declining. A recent IRI study indicated that the price and promo elasticities (response of volume to pricing change) have been steadily declining over the past 3-4 years. Consumers are willing to buy less when faced with decreases in “regular or base” price as well as promoted price.  The study indicated that the “lift” from promotions had decreased by about 1,000 basis points over the past four years.  There is, therefore, an immediate need to manage price and promotion decisions in a more creative and impactful manner.

Three areas of improvement

What does this mean? What can companies do to improve the impact of their pricing and promotion investment? We believe that there are three important areas of improvement. The first area is around a more refined understanding of the impact of price-promo decisions.  The new focus is on understanding the true impact of merchandising through both traditional and new lenses, including stockpiling, cross-retailer pricing and advanced price engines. Being able to more accurately predict the pattern of consumer behavior allows for automation and faster and better decisions.

The second area is around rapid and dynamic decision making. This involves a focus on new techniques such as Artificial Intelligence and Machine Learning to drive price-promo decisions. AI/ML is already getting entrenched within demand identification, product development and in-market execution as well as marketing. Within CPG and retail pricing, this will be accomplished by (a) speed in dealing with the regularly-repeated manual tasks in an efficient manner and (b) new levels of insight and accuracy based upon market trends that enable pricing analysts to focus their efforts on the areas that matter in a dynamic manner. It is imperative to move from a user-driven, manual pricing adjustments to dynamic “smart solutions.”

Another important area of change in pricing and promotion is “personalized pricing;”that is allowing manufacturers and retailers to customize price-promo decisions towards individual consumer/shopper segments. This is done by combining frequent shopper (FSP) data with traditional price-promo modeling for an in-depth evaluation of merchandising strategies as well as developing custom offers that would stimulate demand within these segments. IRI research shows that FSP/loyalty card holders react differently to brand price changes. For example, Brand Loyals react stronger to base price changes, while Brand Non-Loyals react stronger to base price reductions, promotional prices and quality merchandising tactics​.

In our session titled “New Frontiers in Pricing Analytics” at the SAS Global Forum 2018, we will provide a detailed overview of the state of the industry and how it is evolving. We will provide an overview of the new techniques and technologies in this space as well as where things are headed in the future. We hope to see you there.

 

Shifting sands in pricing and promotion was published on SAS Users.

2月 032017
 

I will begin with a short story.

SAS Global Forum, Content is KingLike many employers, McDougall Scientific, my employer, requires its employees to review, with their co-workers and managers, what they learned at a conference or course. They are also asked to suggest applications of their learnings so that McDougall might realize value from the expense, both in time and money, of sending them to continuing education events.

Fei Wang, my co-worker, and I attended SAS Global Forum last year in Vegas. During her presentation to co-workers upon our return, Fei not only provided a comprehensive overview of the conference format, sessions, and learning opportunities, but she also chose one presentation to highlight that will fundamentally improve one of our business processes.

Although Fei attended many sessions and learned much, session 8480-2016, with thanks to Steven Black, will save McDougall enough time and money to dwarf the expenditure of sending Fei to SAS Global Forum.

“But John,” you might ask, “why not simply search the proceedings after the conference?” Well, because we would never think to search for CRF annotation automation. Innovation of this sort is more easily found by attending the conference. Discovering valuable nuggets like Steven’s idea is a common occurrence at SAS Global Forum.

The value that employers realize from SAS Global Forum is the reason “content is king,” a cliché first introduced by the magazine publishing industry in the mid-1970s.

Our speakers represent every region of the world!

Though there are a number of really great benefits from attending the conference, great content continues to reign supreme at SAS Global Forum.  This year’s conference is no different. The 2017 Content Advisory Team has assembled a stellar lineup of well over 600 sessions; invited speakers, contributed papers, hands-on workshops, tutorials and posters. And, I am very proud to report that 25 countries are contributing speakers this year, with every region of the world represented: North, Central, and South Africa, Europe, Australia, the Middle East, Asia and the Americas. This sort of global diversity brings new ideas and new ways of looking at and solving problems that really grows your knowledge and helps move your organization forward.

In addition to all of this great technical content, we have made special effort to organize sessions that help SAS Users better present their work. As Melissa Marshall famously claims, “Science not communicated is science not done.” Therefore, in keeping with the SAS Global Users Group’s mission to champion the needs of SAS users around the globe, here is a sampling of sessions that will help you better communicate.

The list starts with Melissa herself!

Present Your Science: Transforming Technical Talks
Session T108, Melissa Marshall, Principal, Melissa Marshall Consulting LLC

This versatile half-day workshop covers the full gamut: content strategy, slide design, and presentation delivery. With a dynamic combination of lecture, discussion, video analysis, and exercises, this workshop will truly transform how technical professionals present their work and will help foster a culture of improved communications throughout the SAS community.
Read More

How the British Broadcasting Corporation Uses Data to Tell Stories in a Visually Compelling Way
Session 0824, Amanda J Farnsworth, Head of Visual Journalism, BBC News

… data is often seen as a dry, detached, unemotional thing that's hard to understand and for many, easy to ignore. At the BBC, employees have been thinking hard about how to use data to tell stories in a visually compelling way that connects with audiences and makes them more curious about the world that we live in. And, there is an ever-increasing amount of data with which to tell those stories. Governments are publishing more big data sets about health, education, crime, and social makeup. Academics are generating huge amounts of data as a consequence of research. Businesses and other organizations conduct their own research and polling. The BBC’s aim is to take that data and make it relevant at a personal level, answering the audiences' number one question: what does this mean for me?
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Convince Me: Constructing Persuasive Presentations
Session 0862, Frank Carillo, CEO and Anne Coffey, Senior Director, E.C.G. Inc.

Data outputs do not a persuasive argument make. Effective persuasion requires a combination of logic and emotion supported by facts. Statisticians dedicate their lives to analyzing data such that it is appropriate supporting evidence. While the appropriate evidence is essential to convince your listeners, you first have to be able to gain and maintain their attention and trust. Persuasive presentations fight for hearts and minds, and are not a dry, unbiased recitation of facts or analyses. This session is designed to provide suggestions for how to utilize successful structures and create emotional connections.
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Data Visualization Best Practices: Practical Storytelling Using SAS®
Session T117, Greg S Nelson, CEO, Thotwave Technologies LLC.

Data means little without our ability to visually convey it. Whether building a business case to open a new office, acquiring customers, presenting research findings, forecasting or comparing the relative effectiveness of a program, we are crafting a story that is defined by the graphics that we use to tell it. Using practical, real-world examples, students will learn how to critically think about visualizations.
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Presentations as Listeners Like Them: How to Tailor for an Audience
Session 0408, Frank Carillo, CEO and Anne Coffey, Senior Director, E.C.G. Inc.

Data doesn't speak for itself. We speak for it, and how we do that influences how people view and interpret that data. One of the most overlooked aspects of presenting data is analyzing the audience. At no point in history have speakers had to face such heterogeneous audiences as they do today: there might be many as five different generations in the room, cross-functional teams have broad areas of expertise, and international companies integrate different cultures and customs. This session is designed to teach attendees how to analyze not the data, but the listeners. Who is your audience? What is important to them? What is your message …?
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tags: papers & presentations, SAS Global Forum

At SAS Global Forum, Content is King was published on SAS Users.

1月 172017
 

Editor's note: Charyn Faenza co-authored this blog. Learn more about Charyn.

As the fun of the festive season ends, the buzz of the new year and the enchantment of SAS Global Forum 2017 begins. SAS Global Forum is a conference designed by SAS users, for SAS users, bringing together SAS professionals from all over the world to learn, collaborate and network in person. Sure, online communication is great, but it’s hard to beat the thrill of meeting fellow SAS users face-to-face for the first time. It feels like magic! To help you prepare for the event, Charyn and I wanted to share a few things including information on metadata security. Read on for more.

Start your SAS Global Forum journey now!

SUGAWant to stay up to date with SAS Global Forum activities, and get a head start on your conference networking? Join the SAS Global Forum 2017 online community. Here you can post questions, share ideas, and connect with others before the event. While you are at it, the SAS User Group for Administrators (SUGA) community also feels magical for me.  As part of the committee, we regularly get together (virtually!) to discuss and plan exciting events on behalf of SAS administrators around the world.  Join the SUGA community and watch for upcoming events, including a live meet-up at SAS Global Forum! That event is scheduled for Monday, April 3, from 6:30-8:00 p.m.

Security auditing

During his workshop at SAS Global Forum 2014, Gregory Nelson pointed out that the SAS administrator role has evolved over the years, and so has one of their key responsibilities: security auditing. Once you’ve set up an initial security plan, how do you ensure that the environment remains secure? Can you just “set it and forget it?” Probably not. Especially if you want to ensure regulatory compliance, to maintain business confidence and keep your SAS platform in line with its design specifications as your business grows and your SAS environment evolves.

Thinking about your own SAS platform:

  • What would happen in your organization if someone accessed data they shouldn’t?
  • When was your last SAS platform security project?
  • When was it last tested? How extensive was it? How long did it take?
  • Have there been any changes since it was last tested? Whether they are deliberate, accidental, expected or unexpected.
  • How do you know if it’s still secure today?

Presenting at SAS Global Forum

If security is important to you and your organization, please join us at this year’s magical SAS Global Forum, as I co-present with Charyn Faenza on SAS® Metadata Security 301: Auditing Your SAS Environment. Hold your horses… “301?,” Did I hear that right? “What about 101 and 201?" Glad your curious mind asked... At the last two SAS GLOBAL FORUM events, Charyn has presented SAS Metadata Security 101 and 201 papers that step through the fundamentals on authentication and authorization. Check them out at:

Our upcoming 301 paper will focus on auditing to complete the three ‘A’s (Authentication, Authorization and Auditing), including how you can use Metacoda software to regularly review your environment, so you can protect your resources, comply with security auditing requirements, and quickly and easily answer the question "Who has access to what?"

Here are the details for our paper:
Session Title: 786 -  SAS Metadata Security 301: Auditing your SAS Environment
Type: Breakout
Date: Tuesday, April 4
Time: 4:00 PM - 5:00 PM
Location: Dolphin, Dolphin Level III - Asia 4

Our security journey

sas-security-journey

Whether you’re a new SAS administrator or an experienced one, you’ll know that security is a journey rather than a destination.

To help make sure you’re on the right path, check out the SUGA virtual events, SAS administrator tagged blog posts, Twitter #sasadmin and platformadmin.com.

sas-security-journey02If you’d like to chat more about SAS security auditing, please comment below, join our chat in the SAS Global Forum community, or connect with us on Twitter at @HomesAtMetacoda, @CharynFaenza.

Looking forward to seeing you in April at SAS Global Forum 2017 in the enchanting and magical Walt Disney World Swan and Dolphin Resort, Orlando, Florida!


About Charyn Faenza

charynMs. Faenza is Vice President and Manager of Corporate Business Intelligence Systems for First National Bank, the largest subsidiary of F.N.B. Corporation (NYSE: FNB). An accountant by training, she is passionate about not only understanding the technology, but the underlying business utility of the systems her team supports. In her role she is responsible for the architecture and development of F.N.B.’s corporate profitability, stress testing, and analytics platforms and oversees the data collection and governance functions to ensure high data quality, proper data storage and transfer, risk management and data compliance.

Throughout her tenure at F.N.B. her experience in data integration and governance has been leveraged in several cross functional projects where she has been engaged as a strategic consultant regarding the design of systems and processes in the Finance, Treasury and Credit areas of the Bank.

Ms. Faenza earned her bachelor’s degree in Accounting from Youngstown State University where she is currently serving on the Business Advisory Board of the Youngstown State University Laricccia School of Accounting and Finance.

tags: papers & presentations, SAS Administrators, SAS Global Forum, SAS User Group for Administrators

Take a SAS security journey at SAS Global Forum 2017 was published on SAS Users.

12月 222016
 

melissa_marshallEditor's note: This following post is from Melissa Marshall, Principal at Melissa Marshall Consulting LLC. Melissa is a featured speaker at SAS Global Forum 2017, and on a mission to transform how scientists and technical professionals present their work.  

Learn more about Melissa.


Think back to the last technical talk you were an audience member for. What did you think about that talk? Was it engaging and interesting? Boring and overwhelming?  Perhaps it was a topic that was important to you, but it was presented in a way that made it difficult to engage with the content. As an expert in scientific presentations, I often observe a significant “disconnect” between the way a speaker crafts a presentation and the needs of the audience. It is my belief that the way to bridge this gap is for you, as a technical presenter, to become an audience centered speaker vs. a speaker centered speaker.

transform-your-technical-talks01

Here I will provide some quick tips on how to transform your content and slides using your new audience centered speaking approach!

Audience Centered vs. Speaker Centered

The default setting for most presenters is that they are speaker centered—meaning that they make choices in their presentation because it is what works primarily for themselves as a speaker. Examples include: spending a lot of time speaking about an area of the topic that gave you the most difficulty or that you spent the most amount of time working on or using terms that are familiar to you but are jargon for the audience, putting most of the words you want to say on your slides to remind you what to say during the talk so your slides are basically your speaker notes, and standing behind a podium and disconnecting yourself physically from your audience. These choices are common in presentations, but they do not set you up for success. It is a key reason why many presentations of technical information fail.

A critical insight is to realize that your success as a speaker depends entirely upon your ability to make your audience successful.  You don’t get to decide that you gave a great talk (even if no one understood it)!  That’s because presentations, by their very nature, are always made for an audience.  You need something from your audience—that is why you are giving a talk!  So, it is time to get serious about making your audience successful (so you can be too!).  I might define “audience success” as: your audience understands and views your subject in the way you wanted them to.  Strategically, if you desire to be a successful speaker, then the best thing you do is go “all in” on making your audience successful!

Audience Centered Content

To make your content more audience centered, you can ask yourself 4 critical questions ahead of time about your audience:

  • Who are they?
  • What do they know?
  • Why are they here?
  • What biases do they have?

transform-your-technical-talks02

The answers to these questions will guide how you begin to focus your content. Additionally, as a presenter of technical information, one of the most important questions you need to answer along the way, at many stages in your presentation, is “So what?”.  Too often presenters share complex technical information or findings, but they do not make the direct connection to the audience of how that information is relevant or important to the big picture or overall message.  Remind yourself each time you share a technical finding to also follow up that information with the answer to the question “So what?”.  This will make your content immediately more engaging and relevant to your audience.

transform-your-technical-talks03

Audience Centered Slide Design

Think about the last several presentations that you sat through as an audience member.  How would you describe the slides?  Text heavy? Cluttered? No clear message? Full of bulleted lists?  Audiences consistently complain of “Death by PowerPoint”, which refers to the endless march of speakers through text filled slide after text filled slide.  The reason this is so detrimental to audiences is that our brains have a limited “bandwidth” for verbal information.  When we reach that limit, it’s called cognitive overload and our brains stop processing the information as effectively and efficiently.  When you have a speaker talking (the speaker’s words are verbal information) and then you have slides to read with lots of words on them (also more verbal information), you are at a high risk of cognitive overload for the audience.  Therefore, many audiences “tune out” during presentations or report feeling exhausted after a day of listening to presentations.  This is a result of cognitive overload.  A more effective way to approach slides for your audience is to think about making your slides do something for you that your words cannot. You are giving a talk, so the words part is mostly covered by what you are saying…it is much more powerful to make your slides primarily visual so that they convey information in a more memorable, engaging, and understandable way. This is known in the field of cognitive research as the Picture Superiority Effect.  John Medina’s excellent book Brain Rules states that “Based on research into the Picture Superiority Effect, when we read text alone, we are likely to remember only 10 percent of the information 3 days later. If that information is presented to us as text combined with a relevant image, we are likely to remember 65 percent of the information 3 days later.” 

A great a slide design strategy that I advocate for is called the assertion-evidence design.  This slide design strategy is based in research (including Medina’s mentioned above) and works beautifully for presentations of technical information. The assertion-evidence slide design is characterized by a concise, complete sentence headline (no longer than 2 lines) that states the main assertion (i.e. what you want the audience to know) of the slide. The body of the slide then consists of visual evidence for that take away message (charts, graphs, images, equations, etc.). Here is an example of a traditional slide transformed to an assertion-evidence slide:

transform-your-technical-talks04

transform-your-technical-talks05

Having trouble banishing bullet lists? One of my favorite quick (and free!) tools for getting yourself past bulleted lists is Nancy Duarte’s Diagrammer tool.  I like this tool because it asks you what is the relationship between the information that you are trying to show and creates a graphic to show that relationship.  Remember: the best presentations use a variety of visual evidence!  Charts, graphs, pictures, videos, diagrams, etc.  Give your audience lots of visual ways to connect with your content!

Final Thoughts

Next time you present, I encourage you to let every decision you make along the way be guided first by the needs of your audience.  Remember, the success of your audience in understanding your work is how your success as a speaker is measured! For more tips on technical talks, check out my TED Talk entitled “Talk Nerdy To Me.” For questions, comments, or to book a technical presentations workshop at your company or institution, please contact me at melissa@presentyourscience.com.

About Melissa Marshall

melissa_marshallMelissa Marshall is on a mission: to transform how scientists and technical professionals present their work. That’s because she believes that even the best science is destined to remain undiscovered unless it’s presented in a clear and compelling way that sparks innovation and drives adoption.

For almost a decade, she’s traveled around the world to work with Fortune 100 corporations, institutions and universities, teaching the proven strategies she’s mastered through her consulting work and during her 10 years as a faculty member at Penn State University.

When you work with Melissa, you will get the practical skills and the natural confidence you need to immediately shift your “information dump”-style presentations into ones that are meaningful, engaging, and inspire people to take action. And the benefits go far beyond any single presentation; working with Melissa, your entire organization will develop a culture of successful communication, one that will help you launch products and ideas more effectively than ever before.

Melissa is also a dynamic speaker who has lectured at Harvard Medical School, the New York Academy of Sciences, and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). For a sneak peek, check out her TED talk, “Talk Nerdy to Me.” It’s been watched by over 1.5 million people (and counting).

Visit Melissa and learn more at www.PresentYourScience.com.

Melissa can be reached at melissa@presentyourscience.com.

tags: papers & presentations, SAS Global Forum

Transform your technical talks with an audience centered approach was published on SAS Users.

12月 132016
 

sasgf2017_globe_150x150-002

Editor's note: Amanda Farnsworth is Head of Visual Journalism at BBC News and a featured speaker at SAS Global Forum 2017, April 2-5, 2017 in Orlando.

My days are spent trying to put the best content we can in front of our loyal, heartland audience, while reaching out to others, particularly on social media, who may never usually come to the BBC for their news.

It can sometimes be hard to reach both audiences at the same time.

But recently we hit on a format that does exactly that. We call it The Personal Relevance Calculator. We have made a whole series of these calculators on different topics, including “The Great British Class Calculator” (yes we Brits are still obsessed with Class!) and “Will a Robot Take Your Job.

The idea is to take a big data set that tells a story and make it personally relevant to each and every user. Readers simply enter a small amount of personal information – it could be their age or height and weight, or a postcode of where they live – and the result they get back from the calculator is unique, or appears to be unique, to them.  This result is given in a rich, visual way and is very shareable on social media.

The advantages are a much deeper engagement in the subject than we might get by writing a traditional article and they are usually very popular, getting millions of hits, likes and shares. They also appeal to the parts of the audience other BBC content doesn’t reach.

Case Study - Who Is Your Olympic Body Match?

You can find the Olympic Body Match calculator using this link:

At the BBC, we know that the Olympics provide us an opportunity to reach a part of the audience that doesn’t often think of us.  Let’s call them Main Eventers – they are people who don’t like to be left out of those water cooler conversations when a big national or international sporting event is going on.  So they want some way of engaging with a story that they often don’t know much about. Perhaps they are not big sports fans.

big-data-made-small

Enter our calculator. By putting in your height, weight, date of birth and sex, our calculator matches you with the Olympic athlete most like you. Simple but very engaging!

We took care to make the calculator a rich, visual experience with beautiful illustrations drawn by one of our designers. We also used the colourful, carnival branding that our Marketing department came up with and which was used across all BBC Rio 2016 output during the Olympic and Paralympic Games. This didn’t look like a scary sports story, but more of a fun way to be part of the buzz that surrounds the Olympics.

The Calculator Results in Detail

After putting in the four pieces of personal information, the first result showed you how your height compares with the full range of Olympic athletes in Rio.

The next page did the same with your weight, the third with your age. And finally you were shown the 3 athletes most like you.

big-data-made-small02

You may have guessed that these are images of my own Olympic Body Match – I’m not sure being most like an Estonian Wrestler is quite what I had expected!

Hitting the share button generated a box pre-populated with text that enticed the users who received the results to have a go themselves. A link to the calculator is also embedded in the tweet, along with another attractive illustration.

The data and what we did with it.

The data for this interactive was from the Olympic Data Feed, which is used by the BBC and other broadcasters to show the results of all the different events. As part of this feed, the height, weight and age of over 10,000 athletes was available for my team to repurpose.

So far, so good. But it turned out not all the data was available ahead of time. A lot of the information was collected in the days running up to the Games, as the athletes started arriving in Rio, making things a little tight for our development deadlines. To solve this problem we made some test content using figures from the 2012 London Olympics, which we swapped out later for the Rio figures. (The figures for the British track and field team, of particular interest to us, arrived just as the Games were starting.)

As the real data started to come in, we kept our eyes peeled to see who would be the tallest, shortest, heaviest and lightest athletes, as we wanted to highlight them in our graphics, to show the interesting and extreme range of body types represented at the Games.

But, here we had to be careful. As with any dataset this large there was bound to be the occasional glitch, especially when you’re looking for the outliers. Initially the dataset looked as if it contained a rower weighing improbable 200 kilos, and a swimmer whose height was well over seven feet tall.

By checking back with the source, we were able to work out which outliers were incorrect, and which outliers were the right ones for us to focus on.

The shortest athlete was Brazilian gymnast Flavia Saraiva (4ft 4in); the tallest was Li Muhao a Chinese basketball player (7ft 2in).

The data was provided to us through XML feeds.  We matched our readers with the athletes using Euclidean distance. Where someone’s height and weight created more than three matches we picked the athletes whose own birthdate was closest to our reader’s as a way to break ties.

Audience Reaction

Our Body Match Calculator had 4m browsers, 5.8m page impressions and an engagement time of just over a minute.

The audience was 37% female and 63% male – using the gender people matched with as a proxy.

There was good engagement going down the page, with 66% of browsers filling in the form and getting to their results at the foot of the page.

It also did really well on social with this thread on reddit generating nearly a 1,000 comments.

tags: big data, papers & presentations, SAS Global Forum

Making data personal: Big data made small was published on SAS Users.

11月 292016
 

Present at SAS Global Forum 2017est plus près de la maison, está más cerca de casa, está mais perto de casa, dichter bij huis, is closer to home, eh!

In analytics and statistics, we often talk about sample sizes. The size of the data sets that you analyze are a measure of the amount of information contained within those data. When observations are very similar or correlated due to study design, then the information added by having multiple (correlated) observations may be negligible. This is a common problem with clustered data; the information contained in clustered data is closer to the number of clusters than to the number of observations. As a result, study designers seek to measure many clusters.

When it comes to global presenters, SAS Global Forum is seeking more clusters.

Global representation at SAS Global Forum enriches the conference experience for all attendees, providing each of us with more innovation and information to advance the goals of our organizations.

However, we know that attending our conference from the far corners of the globe is expensive … but not as expensive as it used to be! We’ve got good news for SAS users who reside outside the contiguous 48 states of the United States (residents of Alaska, Hawaii, and U.S. territories, read this carefully!).

To ease the financial burden of travelling from afar to the conference, two new policies have been adopted by the SAS Global Users Group – largely in response to your concerns about cost.

Doubled discount for accepted contributed sessions

Each year, SAS Global Forum attracts about 700 proposed sessions from the user community. The review process is competitive as we can only accept 400 session talks. To attract even more submissions from around the globe, we’ve raised the registration discount from 25% to 50% for accepted proposals from the international user community. If you reside outside the 48 contiguous States, and your abstract is approved, you will automatically receive the 50% discount when you register.

As of the writing of this blog, SAS Global Forum 2017 will include four sessions from Africa, ninefrom Australia, 18 from Asia, 12 from South America and the Caribbean, 37 from Canada, 21 from Europe, and 23 from the United Kingdom. With this new policy, we expect far more in 2018 and beyond!

International Professional Awards

Forty SAS Users will be selected from submitted applications to have their registration fee waived. SAS Users who reside outside the contiguous 48 States can apply by completing the application found on the conference website. In this application, you will be asked to describe your SAS experience, barriers to attendance, and about your commitment to attend. Submitters of contributed content are eligible.

We are certain these changes will help make SAS Global Forum the most diverse, international conference yet! I look forward to meeting many SAS users from near and far in Orlando. See you there! Or should I say Wir sehen uns dort! Ci vediamo lì! Nähdään siellä!

tags: International Professional Awards, papers & presentations, SAS Global Forum

SAS Global Forum 2017 is closer to home, or should I say… was published on SAS Users.