reporting

4月 202017
 

Leaders in the education industry understand that when people at all levels have timely access to the right data and reports, they can generate trusted knowledge and insights that help transform programs, curriculums, student outcomes and more. That's how the industry's leaders deliver desired results faster to further student success. [...]

4 examples of how data, reporting and analytics are used in education was published on SAS Voices by Georgia Mariani

5月 212015
 

If you have programmed with SAS in the last 15 years, you have probably had a reason to share your SAS results in PDF format. The ODS PDF destination, much like a well-designed car, has evolved over the years, offering progressively nicer features like security, enhanced image formatting and embedded fonts. I think you’re going to like what SAS 9.4 has to offer!

Let’s discuss three key SAS 9.4 improvements to this beloved, reliable and top rated ODS destination:

  • Pearl default style
  • ODS LAYOUT statement
  • ODSLIST and ODSTEXT procedures

ODS PDF’s new default style: Not just a pretty paint color.

Just like car manufacturers, the ODS developers have improved the “look and feel” of the PDF destination in SAS 9.4 by updating the default style. Styles.Pearl, the new default style for ODS PDF and ODS PRINTER,  is designed with a more modern feel. The headers are no longer shaded, the borders are lighter and we think you’ll agree the results are much more appealing. Here’s a screen shot showing sample PROC PRINT results comparing the new default style, styles.Pearl, with the earlier default, styles.Printer:

Illustration showing differences in SAS 9.4 default ODS Styles.PEARL and previous default Styles.PRINTER

ODS LAYOUT: Production status with robust documentation

The ODS LAYOUT feature, which allows the precise placement of SAS output on a PDF page, was introduced in SAS 9.2. However, it held so much power and required so many feature improvements, it was released in preproduction status. Since that time the SAS programming community has offered feedback on its performance and features, leading to the SAS 9.4 release where the destination is offered with two distinct models: GRIDDED and ABSOLUTE, both of which offer robust “owner’s manuals”.

We think the ABSOLUTE model will be the most popular. You can use it to place tables and images side by side, stack them top to bottom and even overlay output in your PDF files, and works to create output placed on a single PDF page.  The GRIDDED model is more useful when using BY-group data and/or creating multi page output.

The ABSOLUTE LAYOUT syntax uses a pair of ODS LAYOUT statements (ODS LAYOUT START and ODS LAYOUT END) to define the area on the page to which you will write ODS REGIONs.  ODS REGION statements define the location and size of regions to which you will write tables, text or images. Both statements use the X= argument to define the horizontal “start” position, and Y= to define the vertical start position of your output. If you do not use either of these, the output starts in the upper left corner (0,0). Height= and Width= arguments can be used on both statements to control the size of the layouts and regions.

Here is sample code for defining a sleek layout page within your ODS PDF destination:

  • Create a PDF file with FILE=, turn off the bookmark/table of contents with NOTOC, and with NOGTITLE make all Graph titles part of the PDF file, instead of embedding them in the Graph images.
    ods pdf file="file.pdf" notoc nogtitle ;
  • Define a LAYOUT that is 7.25 inches high and 10.5 inches wide.  The keyword ABSOLUTE is not necessary as it is implied if neither the COLUMNS= nor the ROWS= option is used. Previously we have set the system option ORIENTATION= to LANDSCAPE on an OPTIONS statement and set a Title and Footnote, whose text will be placed outside the layout.
    ods layout start height=7.25in width=10.5in ;
  • Define the first REGION. The region is placed inside my layout, starting .75 inch from my top margin (y=.75in) and one inch from my left margin (x=1in). This region is allocated 3.5inches of space across my page (width=3.5in).
    ods region x=1in y=.75in width=3.5in ;

The ODS LAYOUT and REGION statements used above are part of Sample 55808.  We’ll use the full code to generate the following output from SAS 9.4, and I’ll explain how to assemble all the pieces using other new features in SAS 9.4:

SAS 9.4 ODS output using ODS LAYOUT statement

PROC ODSTEXT: easily insert paragraphs of text

The ODSTEXT procedure helps us format paragraph text that would previously have been written with DATA _null_ / FILE PRINT logic or ODS <destination> TEXT= syntax. However, neither of these methods allow for elegant style control and line spacing, nor do either of those strategies integrate well with the table of contents.  Now using PROC ODSTEXT, we can format paragraphs of text (or just single words if preferred!), with ease.

Here’s the first PROC ODSTEXT code used in our screen shot shown above:

  
proc odstext;
    p "The ODSTEXT procedure offers a powerful tool for inserting paragraph style text into your ODS destinations. "  / style=systemtitle;
    p  "The ODSTEXT procedure allows us to: format text with style control offered with the statement option style=,  use data sets, and add bullets."  / style=systemtitle;
    p '  ';
    p "A close sibling is PROC ODSLIST, used to generate the following bulleted list of improved ODS PDF features:" /  style=header;
run;

Here are the results:

PROC ODSTEXT output showing three sizes and

PROC ODSLIST: easily create bulleted lists

Closely related to the ODSTEXT procedure is PROC ODSLIST, which allows us to create nicely formatted, indented and bulleted lists from a SAS dataset. Here’s an example:

 proc odslist data=features;
   item feature /style={bullet="disc"};
   end;
 run;

Here are the results:

PROC ODSLIST output
There’s an added bonus in SAS 9.4: the ODSLIST and ODSTEXT procedures can be used in ANY of the non-LISTING ODS destinations.  Try them out in ODS POWERPOINT and ODS RTF too!

Adding the bar chart to our layout

The image in our PDF file is created with the PROC SGPLOT and highlights a feature new in SAS 9.4, the SYMBOLCHAR statement.  The data and program are described in Sample 54315 and a recent Problem Solvers blog. The key to sizing and inserting the output in the upper right corner of our PDF file is specifying the following ODS REGION statement and the ODS GRAPHICS statement height= option before the PROC SGPLOT code.

ods region x=4in y=.5in ; 
ods graphics on / reset noborder height=3.5in;

Adding the table to the PDF

The bottom table is created by PROC REPORT along with some “power assist” from PROCs ODSTEST and FORMAT. This region is defined only with a Y= specification as I want REPORT’s table to take up the width of the entire region. The REPORT table will be centered by default, but ODSTEXT= will not, hence the j=c style override.

ods region y=4in; 

proc format;
value myfmt low-40="^{style [foreground=red] ^{unicode 2193} "
           40-high="^{style [foreground=green] ^{unicode 2191} ";
run;

proc odstext ;
   p " ";
   p "A subset of SASHELP.CARS where MPG_HIGHWAY is greater than 40 " / style={font=(", Albany",10pt,bold) just=c};
 run;

proc report data=sashelp.cars(where=(mpg_highway gt 40 and cylinders eq 4)) spanrows
style(report)={posttext="^{style [font_weight=bold] PROC FORMAT uses inline formatting and the Unicode style function to differentiate models based on the combined MPG}" };
col make model mpg_highway mpg_city avg type enginesize horsepower drivetrain;
define make / order;
define avg  / computed "Combined MPG" format=8. style(column)={posttext=myfmt.};
compute avg;
   avg=sum(mpg_highway.sum,mpg_city.sum)/2;
endcomp;
run;

Here are the results:

Using ODS LAYOUT feature to create and place a PROC REPORT table
We “put the brakes on” by closing the LAYOUT and the PDF destination:

ods layout end;
ods pdf close;

I hope you have enjoyed “kicking the tires” on my favorite destination. Are you excited about getting this new and updated model? If so, give your SAS dealership (ahem, representative) a call and upgrade today!

Please read the fine print:

If you have been an intrepid ODS LAYOUT coder prior to SAS 9.4, you are likely to see different results from your ODS LAYOUT/REGION statements when you move to SAS 9.4. If using the legacy style, styles.printer, does not correct the results, use Scott Huntley’s paper “An Insider’s Guide to ODS LAYOUT Using SAS® 9.4” . It is an excellent resource for coders moving ODS LAYOUT code from previous releases.

If you are moving from a SAS release prior to version 9.2, Scott and I wrote this paper “Getting the Right Report (Again): Your Compatibility Guide for ODS PDF 9.2” to discuss changes that took place for ODS PDF in that version.

Scott and Woody Middleton introduce you to the new features for ODS PDF in SAS 9.3 in "A Different Point of View with ODS PDF in SAS®9.3".

SAS has provided printable tip sheets for ODS PDF, ODS LAYOUT, PROC ODSTEXT, PROC ODSLIST, ODS GRAPHICS and more.

tags: ods, Problem Solvers, reporting, SAS 9.4, SAS Programmers

The post ODS PDF destination in SAS 9.4: Come take a look under the hood! appeared first on SAS Users.

4月 102015
 

An Info Window is a SAS Visual Analytics pop-up window that provides additional information when a user selects a report object. When designing your report, you can think of an Info Window as simply an additional report section that is defined as hidden.

Now that you know what an Info Window is, what can you put in it? The beauty of it—anything  you would a typical report section! Well, except report and section level prompts, that is.

I think one of the Info Window’s benefits is being able to provide that extra level of detail for a report object without navigating off the current report section.  Info Windows can include:

  • prompts in the report body
  • text to give your users more information on the data source refresh schedule, system maintenance schedule, or system administrator contact information
  • any additional report objects with or without hierarchies to allow access to additional pieces of information to help explain dashboard numbers.

So, if it’s hidden, how do report users access it? Since the Info Window is a hidden report section, you must define an interaction from a source object to the Info Window (aka, hidden report section), and the target object will be the pop-up Info Window. Let’s look at how to configure a report section as an Info Window.

How to configure a report section as an Info Window

In this example report, you can see it contains three normal sections and then two sections that have a lock to the left of the name. That lock represents an Info Window, and the tool tip below reminds  report designers that:

“This tab is available only to report authors. To make the Info window available in the viewers, create a link to the Info window from a report object.”

VAinfo1

I have Section 1 and Section 2 designed to be Info Windows. To make a section an Info Window, use the section’s drop down menu and select Display as Info Window.

VAinfo2

Notice that I have a section level prompt defined. I know this will be removed once I define this section as an Info Window, but it made designing the section easier since I knew this was the parameter that was going to be passed from the source object.

VAinfo3

Now my Section 1 has been defined as an Info Window and automatically renamed to Info Window 1. If you like, you can rename this section. This is why I didn’t bother renaming my Section 1 and Section 2 earlier, when you assign a section to be an Info Window it automatically is renamed for you.

VAinfo4

I’ll go ahead and assign Section 2 to be an Info Window as well and rename my sections. The “IT” and “MC” prefixes on my sections represent my data sources. IT stands for Insight Toys and MC stands for Mega Corp. Since my dashboard is using two different data sources, I ended up creating two Info Windows per data source.

VAinfo5

So even though this report has five sections, the viewer will only see one section, the main Product Line Dashboard section.

How to create the interaction between report objects and Info Windows

Don’t forget to create the interaction between your Info Windows and your main report objects! Otherwise, your viewers will have no way to open the Info Window sections. You can do this from the Interactions tab using the Interactions View and drawing connections between the source objects and target Info Window sections.

VAinfo6

How Info Windows are used in this report

Let’s look at some screenshots from the Product Line dashboard and see how these Info Windows display at viewing.

First, here is the Product Line Dashboard.  The red squares highlight Insight Toy’s Beach Product Line and Mega Corp’s Action Figure Product Line.  These are the Product Lines which I will be double-clicking on to open the linked Info Windows.

VAinfo7

Here is the Info Window that pops-up when I select Insight Toy’s Beach Product Line. In this Info Window, I have a Tile Chart that uses a hierarchy that filters the Crosstab down below. I also have a Text box at the bottom that lets the user know how often the data is refreshed, system downtime, and who to contact if there are questions.

VAinfo8

Here is the Info Window that pops-up when I select Mega Corp’s Action Figure Product Line. In this Info Window, I have a Button Bar that allows the viewer to look deeper into the Product Line by Region and then see the Revenue vs Expenses for the Products and Facility Cities.

VAinfo9

The two bottom Line Charts have similar Info Windows, where you can highlight all the months or a subset of months and get the weekly detail in the Info Window.

VAinfo10

These are just a few ideas of ways you can use Info Windows to support your SAS Visual Analytics reports.

tags: reporting, SAS Professional Services, SAS Programmers, SAS Visual Analytics

The post Include Info Windows in your SAS Visual Analytics reports appeared first on SAS Users.

3月 042015
 

Somebody once said that relationships are not easy. Well now they are—in SAS 9.4, at least!

SAS objects have inherent relationships and dependencies, and a change to one element can often have an impact on one or many related objects. For example, for SAS Visual Analytics reports to work as designed, they need to have access to the data that was used to create them. However, when looking at a report, it is often difficult to determine which data table is the source, what columns are used in the report, or what LASR library the data uses? Enter the batch relationship reporting tools.

The batch relationship reporting tools were introduced in SAS 9.4. These tools enable you to identify relationships among the content objects in the SAS Folder tree. For example, you can identify:

  • the data that a report depends on—down to the column level
  • the jobs that contain a given data table or transformation
  • the tables that that are associated with a given library

If you are familiar with the SAS BI Lineage plug-in in SAS Management Console, the SAS 9.4 relationship reporting provides similar functionality. It’s main advantaged is that these batch tools cover a much wider variety of objects.

Relationship reporting tools

The batch relationship reporting tools are located in the SAS install directory under SASHome in SASPlatformObjectFramework/9.4/tools.

Generating a report is a two-step process, using these tools:

  • Use  the Relationship Loader batch tool (sas-relationship-loader), located in the admin sub-directory of the tools directory, to scan folders and objects, retrieve their relationship information, and load the information into a database in the Web Infrastructure Platform Data Server.
  • Use the Relationship Reporter batch tool (sas-relationship-reporter) to read the database populated by the relationship loader and report on the relationship between objects.

As an alternative to using the relationship loader to load the relationships, you can configure a regularly scheduled job that scans and loads relationship data for all of the content objects in the SAS Folder tree. The instructions to setup a regular loads of relationships can be found under Configuring Automatic Relationship Loading in the SAS(R) 9.4 Intelligence Platform: System Administration Guide.

How to load relationships to the database

The first step in reporting is to load the relationships to the database. The sample command below will load all the relationships to the database. You must pass the web server connection properties, the host and the port, the unrestricted administrative user on the metadata server, and the unrestricted user’s password.

./sas-relationship-loader -host sasserver.mypathname.com
-port 1234 -user abcdef@abcdef -password Xyz123 -loadAll

The –loadall option specifies that relationships are to be loaded for all content objects in the SAS Folders tree. An alternative to the –loadall option is to specify content filters to select the objects whose relationship data is to be loaded.

The Relationship Loader will provide feedback to the screen as it loads the relationship information. The information is stored loaded to a database in the Web Infrastructure Platform Data Server.

relationship1

How to report on relationships among SAS content objects

To report on the relationships, choose from four standard reports or select your own options to produce more fine-tuned results. Reports can be written to the console or to a file in either comma-separated values (CSV) or text file format.

To select the objects whose relationships you want to report (referred to as subjects), you can specify one or more locations in the SAS Folder tree, or you can specify filtering criteria.

The standard reports are:

  • Lineage which reports the objects that each subject depends on. An object depends on another object if it cannot function or cannot be defined without the other object, for example, a report is dependent on a LASR table
  • Impact which reports objects that depend on or contain each subject. An object contains another object if it cannot exist out with the other object, for example, a table contains columns.
  • Direct dependencies which reports the objects that each subject directly depends on.
  • Indirect dependencies which reports objects that each subject depends on either directly or indirectly.

Example of a direct dependencies report

Let’s look at an example of a report, the command below uses the –report option to execute the standard report on direct dependencies for objects in the /Demos folder.

./sas-relationship-reporter -host sasserver.mypathname.com -port=1234 
-user abcdef@abcdef -password Xyz123 -report directDependencies “/Demos” 

The output generated shows the Visual Analytic reports, and the objects that they depend on, in this case the LASR tables, LASR library and Load job. The relationship direction is noted with an arrow.
“/Sales/Reports/Dashboard” (SAS report (2G))
–> Is dependent on: “/Sales/LASR Data/DASHBOARD” (Table)
–> Is dependent on: “/Sales/LASR Data/LASR Library” (Library)
–> Is dependent on: “User Written” (JobTransformation) – in “/Sales/LASR Data/DASHBOARD 
– Load Job 0925140747AM” (Job) 

“/Sales/Reports/VAD – Monthly Sales and Business Profit” (SAS report (2G))
–> Is dependent on: “/Sales/LASR Data/PROFIT_COMPANY_PRODUCT_MONTH” (Table)
–> Is dependent on: “/Sales/LASR Data/LASR Library” (Library)
–> Is dependent on: “User Written” (JobTransformation) – in “/Sales/LASR Data/PROFIT_COMPANY_PRODUCT_MONTH – Load Job 0925140749AM” (Job)

Example of an impact report

What if you want to determine the impact of changing one LASR table? This example selects an individual LASR table and generates an impact report. The output shows that five Visual Analytics Reports would be impacted by any change to the PROFIT_COMPANY_PRODUCT_MONTH LASR table.

./sas-relationship-reporter -host sasserver.mypathname.com -port=1234 -user abcdef@abcdef 
-password Xyz123 -report impact “/SharedData/VisualStatistics/LASRTables/PROFIT_COMPANY_PRODUCT_MONTH(Table)”

The output generated shows the Visual Analytic reports, and the objects that they depend on. The relationship direction is noted with an arrow.

“/Shared Data/VisualStatistics/LASRTables/PROFIT_COMPANY_PRODUCT_MONTH” (Table)
< – Is dependent on: “/Demos/VAD – Monthly Sales and Business Profit” (SAS report (2G))
< – Is dependent on: “/Demos/VAD – Sales and Profit Analysis” (SAS report (2G))
< – Is dependent on: “/Demos/VAD-Sales and Cost Trend – Profit by Product” (SAS report (2G))
< – Is dependent on: “/Demos/VAE – Profit and Sales Bubble_report” (SAS report (2G))
< – Is dependent on: “/Demos/VAE – Profit by Product Hierarchy_report” (SAS report (2G))
< – Is dependent on: “Table metadata update” (JobTransformation) – in “/Shared Data/VisualStatistics/LASRTables/PROFIT_COMPANY_PRODUCT_MONTH – Load Job 11251           40817PM” (Job)
< – Contains: “/Shared Data/VisualStatistics/LASRTables/PROFIT_COMPANY_PRODUCT_MONTH – Load Job 1125140817PM” (Job)

Using relationship content filters to subset reports

There are many ways to use filters to subset the reporting. Relationship filters can subset the relationship types and scope to be included in the report output. Relationship content filters select the related objects that are to be included in the report output.

To the subset the subject of the reports you can use the object path, as we did in the first two examples, or you can use content filters to select the objects that you are interested in. Content filters can be defined on a variety of metadata attributes including created or modified date, attribute name and value, name, description, keyword or object type.

If you want to report on certain types of subject, for example SAS Visual Analytics reports, the first step is determining the public object types to include in the query. To do that open up the object type dictionary in SAS Management Console. In SAS Management Console select the Folders tab and expand System ? Types ? to browse the public type definitions.

Select SAS report (2G), right-click and select Properties then select the Advanced tab. Note the TypeName is Report.BI, this is the value that needs to be passed to the types option of the tool. It is the public type of the object. NOTE: the values must be passed in this exact case.

relationship2

This example will create a lineage report for each SAS Visual Analytics report in the repository.

./sas-relationship-reporter -host sasserver.mypathname.com -port=1234 -user abcdef@abcdef 
-password Xyz123 -report lineage -type Report.BI

For each report the output shows the table that the report is dependent on, the library that the table is dependent on and the columns that the table contains.

“/User Folders/Susan/My Folder/Cars Summary Report” (SAS report (2G))
–> Is dependent on: “/Shared Data/VisualStatistics/LASRTables/CARSSASHELP” (Table)
–> Is dependent on: “/Products/SAS Visual Analytics Administrator/Visual Analytics LASR” (Library)
–> Contains: “Cylinders” (Column)
–> Contains: “DriveTrain” (Column)
–> Contains: “EngineSize” (Column)
–> Contains: “Horsepower” (Column)
–> Contains: “Invoice” (Column)
–> Contains: “Length” (Column)
–> Contains: “Make” (Column)
–> Contains: “Model” (Column)
–> Contains: “MPG_City” (Column)
–> Contains: “MPG_Highway” (Column)
–> Contains: “MSRP” (Column)
–> Contains: “Origin” (Column)
–> Contains: “Type” (Column)
–> Contains: “Weight” (Column)
–> Contains: “Wheelbase” (Column)

This blog has only scratched the surface of the Batch Relationship Reporting Tools.  The tools are fully documented in the SAS 9.4 Intelligence Platform: System Administration Admin Guide.

tags: reporting, SAS 9.4, SAS object relationships, SAS Professional Services
10月 042014
 

Report design includes several phases. Granted, these phases aren’t official:  they’re more a reflection of my own thought processes and how my report designs typically unfold:

  • the initial “get the data on the screen to see what we have” phase
  • the addition of filters and prompts to assist with guided analysis
  • the definition of interactions to support drill-down and detail level analysis
  • and finally the beautification phase.

The most time-consuming phases of report design are the two middle phases.  However, when demonstrating reports to business units, it is typically the last phase, the beautification phase, that gets business user buy-in.

VAlayering1This last phase leads us to the topic of this post:  object layering in SAS Visual Analytics Designer. You can layer report objects in all releases when using the precision layout option, but SAS Visual Analytics 6.3 introduced the ability to enable or disable Selection in viewer. This object property controls whether an object is selectable, i.e., whether you can select the object container or maximize the object in the viewers. The ability to layer and flatten text and graphs is a powerful tool when putting the polishing touches on your report design.

Here’s an overview of some of the report objects that can be layered:

Graph Objects

You can layer graph objects in all releases of SAS Visual Analytics Designer, but with the introduction of the Custom Graph Builder, you can create custom, reusable graph objects for all users, starting with twelve base graph elements.  A custom graph can be:

  • a single graph with specific customizations
  • several graphs overlaid on each other
  • a compilation of graphs.

If your custom graph contains several overlaid graphs, you can configure shared roles across x or y axes—a great new feature!  Ultimately, once this custom graph is created, you will want to make it available for other users to leverage. Simply save your custom graph in a location that others can access.

Here are just a couple of custom graph examples. Example 1 shows the default time series plot where the group style layout is overlay filled for both measures: Product Price (target) and Product Price (actual). I wanted my custom graph to have the target price use the overlay filled style and the actual price use the overlay unfilled (which is just a solid line) to better see how close the actual values are to the target values.

SAS Visual Analytics custom graph

Example 1

Example 2 shows a chart object not available in Designer: the Schedule Chart. You could have a bar chart displaying the total elapsed days for a project, but the custom schedule chart can actually graph the start and end for each task. The custom schedule chart also allows you to easily sort on the start/finish dates to get the proper order of your tasks. 

SAS Visual Analytics custom graph

Example 2

Controls

Layering objects gives the report designer the freedom to place report-body controls anywhere you wish. In this example, I placed the Product Line drop down control inside the frame of the bar chart.

If you have many graph objects on a dashboard-style report with drop-down menus that do not filter all of the graphs (which can happen when using several data sources that do not share columns), consider rearranging your objects so that the menus are closer to those affected objects. You can also use the text object to provide instructions for how to navigate the report.

Notice that the Enable selection in viewer option is true for the bar chart in this image. You can see the option to maximize the bar char is available. If not selected, then the window around the bar chart vanishes, but any interactions defined for the bar chart still exist.

VAlayering4

Text and Image Objects

Layering text and image objects allows reports to be able to satisfy a wide range of report design requirements without distracting the report user. This next example uses several images and text objects but is seamless to the report user because the Enable selection in viewer option is false by default for text and image objects. Therefore, as the report user hovers over images and text to get to the graph, the only active window available for selection is the bar chart.

VAlayering5

The next time you are heads down designing self-guiding reports, keep layering in the back of your mind for when you finally get the chance to breathe and put on those finishing touches!

tags: reporting, SAS Professional Services, SAS Programmers, SAS Visual Analytics
3月 102014
 

We can watch games on TV, rent a movie from Redbox, and Google our favorite SAS procedures when we’ve forgotten how something works.  There are a myriad of ways to get entertained or educated in a second-hand way.  But, whether it’s being at the ballpark, in a theater, or at SAS Global Forum – there’s nothing like being there in person.  I look forward every year to being there at SAS Global Forum.  There’s something about hearing and seeing someone talk about a project, solution or technique that you just can’t get from just reading about it.  And, being surrounded by thousands of like-minded folks has a way of energizing me for long after the conference ends.

Once you’re there at SAS Global Forum 2014, with over 500 sessions in three days, the task of finding the things that you want to see might seem daunting.  At my first conference more than 20 years ago, everything was on paper, and it was a time-consuming task to come up with a plan of attack.  Now, you don’t have to look through pages of titles or abstracts to find the presentations that might interest you.  The conference scheduler is a great tool for getting the most out of the conference.  Log in and click on “My Schedule” and you can search on keywords, topics or names and find presentations that match your needs. And you can check the schedule on the SAS Global Forum 2014 mobile app too.

My passion is reporting, so I started my search with the obvious topics, such as ODS, Excel, PROC REPORT, graphics, and so on.  This filtered down the 500+ to a manageable list from which I could peruse the abstracts and with just a click, put it on my personal schedule.  I quickly added Cynthia Zender’s presentation on ACROSS in PROC REPORT, Scott Huntley’s presentation on PDF and HTML, Chevell Parker’s presentation on ODS and Excel, and a number of others.

You can also search on presenter name. I knew that Vince DelGobbo has always done a great job presenting on SAS and Excel.  Lo and behold, a search on his name found “Ask Vince: Moving SAS® Data and Analytical Results to Microsoft Excel.”  The abstract says that it will be “an open-ended discussion about techniques for transferring data and analytical results from SAS® to Microsoft Excel…and to come prepared to ask and get answers to your questions.”  There’s even a web link in the abstract to submit your questions in advance.  What did I say about how much better it is to be there in person!

It doesn’t matter what your SAS interests are – there will be something for you at the conference.  And while you’re there, make sure to take advantage of another thing you can’t get any other way – the SAS Support and Demo Area.   The room is filled with developers, technical support analysts and other SAS staff that are just waiting to talk with you.  I’ve always been impressed that with the time they take, whether it’s answering your questions or listening to how you use SAS.  It’s also the place to see “Super Demos” – short presentations focused mostly on new features you might not be familiar with.

There are a lot of reasons for “being there” when it comes to SAS Global Forum.  I hope you can make it and that you’ll look me up if you do.

-- Pete

tags: papers & presentations, reporting, SAS Global Forum
3月 102014
 

We can watch games on TV, rent a movie from Redbox, and Google our favorite SAS procedures when we’ve forgotten how something works.  There are a myriad of ways to get entertained or educated in a second-hand way.  But, whether it’s being at the ballpark, in a theater, or at SAS Global Forum – there’s nothing like being there in person.  I look forward every year to being there at SAS Global Forum.  There’s something about hearing and seeing someone talk about a project, solution or technique that you just can’t get from just reading about it.  And, being surrounded by thousands of like-minded folks has a way of energizing me for long after the conference ends.

Once you’re there at SAS Global Forum 2014, with over 500 sessions in three days, the task of finding the things that you want to see might seem daunting.  At my first conference more than 20 years ago, everything was on paper, and it was a time-consuming task to come up with a plan of attack.  Now, you don’t have to look through pages of titles or abstracts to find the presentations that might interest you.  The conference scheduler is a great tool for getting the most out of the conference.  Log in and click on “My Schedule” and you can search on keywords, topics or names and find presentations that match your needs. And you can check the schedule on the SAS Global Forum 2014 mobile app too.

My passion is reporting, so I started my search with the obvious topics, such as ODS, Excel, PROC REPORT, graphics, and so on.  This filtered down the 500+ to a manageable list from which I could peruse the abstracts and with just a click, put it on my personal schedule.  I quickly added Cynthia Zender’s presentation on ACROSS in PROC REPORT, Scott Huntley’s presentation on PDF and HTML, Chevell Parker’s presentation on ODS and Excel, and a number of others.

You can also search on presenter name. I knew that Vince DelGobbo has always done a great job presenting on SAS and Excel.  Lo and behold, a search on his name found “Ask Vince: Moving SAS® Data and Analytical Results to Microsoft Excel.”  The abstract says that it will be “an open-ended discussion about techniques for transferring data and analytical results from SAS® to Microsoft Excel…and to come prepared to ask and get answers to your questions.”  There’s even a web link in the abstract to submit your questions in advance.  What did I say about how much better it is to be there in person!

It doesn’t matter what your SAS interests are – there will be something for you at the conference.  And while you’re there, make sure to take advantage of another thing you can’t get any other way – the SAS Support and Demo Area.   The room is filled with developers, technical support analysts and other SAS staff that are just waiting to talk with you.  I’ve always been impressed that with the time they take, whether it’s answering your questions or listening to how you use SAS.  It’s also the place to see “Super Demos” – short presentations focused mostly on new features you might not be familiar with.

There are a lot of reasons for “being there” when it comes to SAS Global Forum.  I hope you can make it and that you’ll look me up if you do.

-- Pete

tags: papers & presentations, reporting, SAS Global Forum
3月 102014
 

We can watch games on TV, rent a movie from Redbox, and Google our favorite SAS procedures when we’ve forgotten how something works.  There are a myriad of ways to get entertained or educated in a second-hand way.  But, whether it’s being at the ballpark, in a theater, or at SAS Global Forum – there’s nothing like being there in person.  I look forward every year to being there at SAS Global Forum.  There’s something about hearing and seeing someone talk about a project, solution or technique that you just can’t get from just reading about it.  And, being surrounded by thousands of like-minded folks has a way of energizing me for long after the conference ends.

Once you’re there at SAS Global Forum 2014, with over 500 sessions in three days, the task of finding the things that you want to see might seem daunting.  At my first conference more than 20 years ago, everything was on paper, and it was a time-consuming task to come up with a plan of attack.  Now, you don’t have to look through pages of titles or abstracts to find the presentations that might interest you.  The conference scheduler is a great tool for getting the most out of the conference.  Log in and click on “My Schedule” and you can search on keywords, topics or names and find presentations that match your needs. And you can check the schedule on the SAS Global Forum 2014 mobile app too.

My passion is reporting, so I started my search with the obvious topics, such as ODS, Excel, PROC REPORT, graphics, and so on.  This filtered down the 500+ to a manageable list from which I could peruse the abstracts and with just a click, put it on my personal schedule.  I quickly added Cynthia Zender’s presentation on ACROSS in PROC REPORT, Scott Huntley’s presentation on PDF and HTML, Chevell Parker’s presentation on ODS and Excel, and a number of others.

You can also search on presenter name. I knew that Vince DelGobbo has always done a great job presenting on SAS and Excel.  Lo and behold, a search on his name found “Ask Vince: Moving SAS® Data and Analytical Results to Microsoft Excel.”  The abstract says that it will be “an open-ended discussion about techniques for transferring data and analytical results from SAS® to Microsoft Excel…and to come prepared to ask and get answers to your questions.”  There’s even a web link in the abstract to submit your questions in advance.  What did I say about how much better it is to be there in person!

It doesn’t matter what your SAS interests are – there will be something for you at the conference.  And while you’re there, make sure to take advantage of another thing you can’t get any other way – the SAS Support and Demo Area.   The room is filled with developers, technical support analysts and other SAS staff that are just waiting to talk with you.  I’ve always been impressed that with the time they take, whether it’s answering your questions or listening to how you use SAS.  It’s also the place to see “Super Demos” – short presentations focused mostly on new features you might not be familiar with.

There are a lot of reasons for “being there” when it comes to SAS Global Forum.  I hope you can make it and that you’ll look me up if you do.

-- Pete

tags: papers & presentations, reporting, SAS Global Forum
3月 102014
 

We can watch games on TV, rent a movie from Redbox, and Google our favorite SAS procedures when we’ve forgotten how something works.  There are a myriad of ways to get entertained or educated in a second-hand way.  But, whether it’s being at the ballpark, in a theater, or at SAS Global Forum – there’s nothing like being there in person.  I look forward every year to being there at SAS Global Forum.  There’s something about hearing and seeing someone talk about a project, solution or technique that you just can’t get from just reading about it.  And, being surrounded by thousands of like-minded folks has a way of energizing me for long after the conference ends.

Once you’re there at SAS Global Forum 2014, with over 500 sessions in three days, the task of finding the things that you want to see might seem daunting.  At my first conference more than 20 years ago, everything was on paper, and it was a time-consuming task to come up with a plan of attack.  Now, you don’t have to look through pages of titles or abstracts to find the presentations that might interest you.  The conference scheduler is a great tool for getting the most out of the conference.  Log in and click on “My Schedule” and you can search on keywords, topics or names and find presentations that match your needs. And you can check the schedule on the SAS Global Forum 2014 mobile app too.

My passion is reporting, so I started my search with the obvious topics, such as ODS, Excel, PROC REPORT, graphics, and so on.  This filtered down the 500+ to a manageable list from which I could peruse the abstracts and with just a click, put it on my personal schedule.  I quickly added Cynthia Zender’s presentation on ACROSS in PROC REPORT, Scott Huntley’s presentation on PDF and HTML, Chevell Parker’s presentation on ODS and Excel, and a number of others.

You can also search on presenter name. I knew that Vince DelGobbo has always done a great job presenting on SAS and Excel.  Lo and behold, a search on his name found “Ask Vince: Moving SAS® Data and Analytical Results to Microsoft Excel.”  The abstract says that it will be “an open-ended discussion about techniques for transferring data and analytical results from SAS® to Microsoft Excel…and to come prepared to ask and get answers to your questions.”  There’s even a web link in the abstract to submit your questions in advance.  What did I say about how much better it is to be there in person!

It doesn’t matter what your SAS interests are – there will be something for you at the conference.  And while you’re there, make sure to take advantage of another thing you can’t get any other way – the SAS Support and Demo Area.   The room is filled with developers, technical support analysts and other SAS staff that are just waiting to talk with you.  I’ve always been impressed that with the time they take, whether it’s answering your questions or listening to how you use SAS.  It’s also the place to see “Super Demos” – short presentations focused mostly on new features you might not be familiar with.

There are a lot of reasons for “being there” when it comes to SAS Global Forum.  I hope you can make it and that you’ll look me up if you do.

-- Pete

tags: papers & presentations, reporting, SAS Global Forum
3月 102014
 

We can watch games on TV, rent a movie from Redbox, and Google our favorite SAS procedures when we’ve forgotten how something works.  There are a myriad of ways to get entertained or educated in a second-hand way.  But, whether it’s being at the ballpark, in a theater, or at SAS Global Forum – there’s nothing like being there in person.  I look forward every year to being there at SAS Global Forum.  There’s something about hearing and seeing someone talk about a project, solution or technique that you just can’t get from just reading about it.  And, being surrounded by thousands of like-minded folks has a way of energizing me for long after the conference ends.

Once you’re there at SAS Global Forum 2014, with over 500 sessions in three days, the task of finding the things that you want to see might seem daunting.  At my first conference more than 20 years ago, everything was on paper, and it was a time-consuming task to come up with a plan of attack.  Now, you don’t have to look through pages of titles or abstracts to find the presentations that might interest you.  The conference scheduler is a great tool for getting the most out of the conference.  Log in and click on “My Schedule” and you can search on keywords, topics or names and find presentations that match your needs. And you can check the schedule on the SAS Global Forum 2014 mobile app too.

My passion is reporting, so I started my search with the obvious topics, such as ODS, Excel, PROC REPORT, graphics, and so on.  This filtered down the 500+ to a manageable list from which I could peruse the abstracts and with just a click, put it on my personal schedule.  I quickly added Cynthia Zender’s presentation on ACROSS in PROC REPORT, Scott Huntley’s presentation on PDF and HTML, Chevell Parker’s presentation on ODS and Excel, and a number of others.

You can also search on presenter name. I knew that Vince DelGobbo has always done a great job presenting on SAS and Excel.  Lo and behold, a search on his name found “Ask Vince: Moving SAS® Data and Analytical Results to Microsoft Excel.”  The abstract says that it will be “an open-ended discussion about techniques for transferring data and analytical results from SAS® to Microsoft Excel…and to come prepared to ask and get answers to your questions.”  There’s even a web link in the abstract to submit your questions in advance.  What did I say about how much better it is to be there in person!

It doesn’t matter what your SAS interests are – there will be something for you at the conference.  And while you’re there, make sure to take advantage of another thing you can’t get any other way – the SAS Support and Demo Area.   The room is filled with developers, technical support analysts and other SAS staff that are just waiting to talk with you.  I’ve always been impressed that with the time they take, whether it’s answering your questions or listening to how you use SAS.  It’s also the place to see “Super Demos” – short presentations focused mostly on new features you might not be familiar with.

There are a lot of reasons for “being there” when it comes to SAS Global Forum.  I hope you can make it and that you’ll look me up if you do.

-- Pete

tags: papers & presentations, reporting, SAS Global Forum