SAS administrators

1月 272021
 

SASensei logoSAS offers myriad ways to level up your SAS skills (scroll to the bottom to see a list of SAS-provided learning paths and channels). In this post, I introduce you to SASensei, an independent, third-party online SAS learning resource that I enjoy a lot.

Learning: dull or fun?

Learning is not always associated with fun. Sometimes it feels difficult and exhausting. New concepts often contradict our prior knowledge and experience, compelling us to rethink, adjust, change and adapt to new paradigms.

Learning new ideas, skills and technologies can be intimidating, challenging and demanding. While learning, you are stretching out of your comfort zone. But that feeling is only transient. As a matter of attitude, learning is not about pushing yourself out of your comfort zone, it’s about expanding your comfort zone. And that is long lasting. The more you learn, the more comfortable and self-confident you become.

Learning does not have to be tedious. Look at pre-school kids. They learn basic life skills like walking (rolling, crawling), talking (in one or more languages), asking questions (a lot) – all without taking classes, just through their natural curiosity and ... playing games.

What is SASensei? Gamified SAS learning

When I first discovered the SASensei online SAS learning game/application I was pleasantly surprised by its non-traditional approach to learning such a serious and well-established platform as SAS.

As stated on its website, “Sasensei is a question based learning system. You must demonstrate your command of SAS® to earn Tokens - which should be wisely invested, to enable you to unlock new levels within the game...”

The following screenshot shows the main page of the SASensei website that displays a dashboard of the top players (they call it leaderboard). You can filter it geographically - by Country, Continent, or World, as well as by the timeline – by Past Month, Past Year, or All Time.

SASensei leaderboard

Privacy or prominence

Users have full control of their privacy or prominence. As you can see in the screenshot above, registered users are displayed by their screen names. This allows the users to either remain anonymous by selecting some fictitious obscure screen name or use their real name. Users can change their screen name at any time.

Rules of the game

In this blog post I provide just an overview of the main functionality and features of the SASensei learning platform. For detailed rules of the game, see SASensei Documentation.

Play and learn

Users are offered a variety of learning activities:

  • Viewing, reviewing and submitting SAS-learning flashcards;
  • Playing, reviewing and submitting questions by different SAS-related topics;
  • Taking and creating public, private, multi-player and custom quizzes;
  • Providing feedback on questions and flashcards by voting and commenting.

Users can challenge themselves by delving into different topics. Your successes and failures will provide you an honest and objective estimation of your SAS strengths as well as weaknesses. A healthy competition with other users encourages you to learn more and hone your SAS skills. When you fail a question, you can review the explanation of the correct answer and thus learn why you failed and acquire new knowledge, tips and tricks quickly and efficiently.

Invest, score, win and build a reputation

To play you will need to earn and spend tokens which are essentially the game’s currency. To motivate you further, you also earn reputation points, which is your ultimate score, a level of achievement in demonstrating SAS skills. Your reputation score is prominently displayed in your public profile. As you progress in the game and your reputation grows, additional functionality unlocks and becomes available to you. Your reputation score determines your SASensei standing level which is derived from those used in martial arts:

Sasensei title Sasamurai title

  • White Belt (new players)
  • Yellow Belt (reputation ≥ 50)
  • Green Belt (reputation ≥ 100)
  • Black Belt (reputation ≥ 200)
  • Sasamurai (reputation ≥ 500)
  • Assassin (reputation ≥ 1000)
  • Sasensei (reputation ≥ 5000)

Sample SASensei question

When you play a question, you select a topic, and then you are presented with a randomly selected multiple-choice question of a specified time limit (30, 60, 90 or 120 seconds). Here is a sample of such question:

Question:

What is wrong with the following LIBNAME statement?
libname fruits (apples oranges tomatoes);

Answers:

  • Incorrect syntax
  • You cannot mix apples and oranges in LIBNAME statement
  • Nothing is wrong, valid LIBNAME statement
  • Tomatoes are not fruits, therefore the statement is not correct

Correct answer:

Nothing is wrong, valid LIBNAME statement

Explanation:

According to Combine and conquer with SAS for examples of usage.

Question
Try tackling a question on your own in the SASensei environment to get real life experience: Sample Question.

Take a SASensei sample quiz

There are various quizzes available at SASensei: public quizzes, multiplayer quiz games, private quizzes (tests) for students.

A public quiz contains 12 questions with a total time cap of 12 minutes, and costs eight tokens to play. You can choose a single topic (sas statements, sas macro, procedures, options, etc.), and if you pass (75% or more) you get 12 tokens back, plus 20 point to your reputation. If you get 100%, you get 30 reputation points plus Top Student badge. A count of passed sessions (by topic) is displayed on your public profile.

QuizAlthough public quizzes are unlocked at the SASamurai level, for the readers of this blog, I have created a special custom quiz sample so you can experience it firsthand right here, right now. Just click on this link, Sample Quiz, register, and enjoy your ride.

See you at the top of the SASensei dashboard!

Credit

Big THANKS to Allan Bowe (United Kingdom) – SAS innovator and entrepreneur who created and founded SASensei learning platform.

Other SAS learning resources

Game on! SASensei: a fun way to learn SAS was published on SAS Users.

12月 172020
 

There’s nothing worse than being in the middle of a task and getting stuck. Being able to find quick tips and tricks to help you solve the task at hand, or simply entertain your curiosity, is key to maintaining your efficiency and building everyday skills. But how do you get quick information that’s ALSO engaging? By adding some personality to traditionally routine tutorials, you can learn and may even have fun at the same time. Cue the SAS Users YouTube channel.

With more than 50 videos that show personality published to-date and over 10,000 hours watched, there’s no shortage of learning going on. Our team of experts love to share their knowledge and passion (with personal flavor!) to give you solutions to those everyday tasks.

What better way to round out the year than provide a roundup of our most popular videos from 2020? Check out these crowd favorites:

Most viewed

  1. How to convert character to numeric in SAS
  2. How to import data from Excel to SAS
  3. How to export SAS data to Excel

Most hours watched

  1. How to import data from Excel to SAS
  2. How to convert character to numeric in SAS
  3. Simple Linear Regression in SAS
  4. How to export SAS data to Excel
  5. How to Create Macro Variables and Use Macro Functions
  6. The SAS Exam Experience | See a Performance-Based Question in Action
  7. How it Import CSV files into SAS
  8. SAS Certification Exam: 4 tips for success
  9. SAS Date Functions FAQs
  10. Merging Data Sets in SAS Using SQL

Latest hits

  1. Combining Data in SAS: DATA Step vs SQL
  2. How to Concatenate Values in SAS
  3. How to Market to Customers Based on Online Behavior
  4. How to Plan an Optimal Tour of London Using Network Optimization
  5. Multiple Linear Regression in SAS
  6. How to Build Customized Object Detection Models

Looking forward to 2021

We’ve got you covered! SAS will continue to publish videos throughout 2021. Subscribe now to the SAS Users YouTube channel, so you can be notified when we’re publishing new videos. Be on the lookout for some of the following topics:

  • Transforming variables in SAS
  • Tips for working with SAS Technical Support
  • How to use Git with SAS

2020 roundup: SAS Users YouTube channel how to tutorials was published on SAS Users.

12月 092020
 

Today, SAS customers visit a variety of places for customer support needs. This multiple environment approach is tedious and confusing. My SAS solves this issue by combining these various customer service locations into a single environment. Meet My SAS!

What is My SAS?

My SAS is a brand-new customer experience page. This new location takes a variety of customer service places and puts them in one interface. The goal of My SAS is to ensure all SAS customers have the best possible experience available in the marketplace.

Finding My SAS

You can access My SAS in a variety of ways:
Finding My SAS

  • My SAS can be accessed via its web address: my.sas.com,
  • via the Software Order Email (SOE),
  • or at the top right-hand side of the sas.com page by clicking on the person icon.

What does My SAS do?

My SAS consists of four major components. Let’s explore each page.

For all SAS Customers (v9 and Viya 3):

1. Overview page

From here you can see and/or update your SAS profile. Manage and review your orders or learn more about SAS Viya or My SAS. On the top ribbon of this page, you can dive deeper into My SAS by going to outstand technical tracks via ‘My Services’, view or sign up for SAS Cloud offerings via ‘My Cloud”, and for Viya 2020 customers, access deployment order assets via “My Viya Orders’.

Overview Page

2. My Services page

The My Services page show open support tracks, the track ID, and the status of these tracks associated with the SAS user. Users can also create a new technical track from this location.

My Services Page

3. My Cloud page

The My Cloud page is the location for signing up, launching, and accessing SAS Cloud Offerings. This is also where you can preview new product trials and see when any existing trial periods will end.

My Cloud Page

For SAS Viya 2020 customers:

4. My Orders page

The My orders page displays information for each of your SAS Viya 2020 orders. For each order, you can download deployment assets and access documentation for the selected version. You can also manage user access to the orders.

My Orders Page

In summary, My SAS is your single location for managing your SAS profile, technical tracks, and cloud offerings. For Viya 2020, you can manage your order deployment assets and users' access to these orders. To learn more about My SAS, please check out this tour video:

What are you waiting for? Explore My SAS today!

Meet My SAS was published on SAS Users.

11月 202020
 

If you’re like me and the rest of the conference team, you’ve probably attended more virtual events this year than you ever thought possible. You can see the general evolution of virtual events by watching the early ones from April or May and compare them to the recent ones. We at SAS Global Forum are studying the virtual event world, and we’re learning what works and what needs to be tweaked. We’re using that knowledge to plan the best possible virtual SAS Global Forum 2021.

Everything is virtual these days, so what do we mean by virtual?

Planning a good virtual event takes time, and we’re working through the process now. One thing is certain -- we know the importance of providing quality content and an engaging experience for our attendees. We want to provide attendees with the opportunity as always, but virtually, to continue to learn from other SAS users, hear about new and exciting developments from SAS, and connect and network with experts, peers, partners and SAS. Yes, I said network. We realize it won’t be the same as a live event, but we are hopeful we can provide attendees with an incredible experience where you connect, learn and share with others.

Call for content is open

One of the differences between SAS Global Forum and other conferences is that SAS users are front and center, and the soul of the conference. We can’t have an event without user content. And that’s where you come in! The call for content opened November 17 and lasts through December 21, 2020. Selected presenters will be notified in January 2021. Presentations will be different in 2021; they will be 30 minutes in length, including time for Q&A when able. And since everything is virtual, video is a key component to your content submission. We ask for a 3-minute video along with your title and abstract.

The Student Symposium is back

Calling all postsecondary students -- there’s still time to build a team for the Student Symposium. If you are interested in data science and want to showcase your skills, grab a teammate or two and a faculty advisor and put your thinking caps on. Applications are due by December 21, 2020.

Learn more

I encourage you to visit the SAS Global Forum website for up-to-date information, follow #SASGF on social channels and join the SAS communities group to engage with the conference team and other attendees.

Connect, learn and share during virtual SAS Global Forum 2021 was published on SAS Users.

11月 192020
 
SAS loves data. It's our raison d'être. We've been dealing with Big Data long before the term was first used in 2005. A brief history of Big Data*:

  • In 1887, Herman Hollerith invented punch cards and a reader to organize census data.
  • In 1937, the US government had a punch-card reading machine created to keep track of 26 M Americans and 3 M employers as a result of the Social Security Act.
  • In 1943, Colossus was created to decipher Nazi codes during World War II.
  • In 1952, the National Security Agency was created to confront decrypting intelligence signals during the Cold War.
  • In 1965, the US Government built the first data center to store 742 M tax returns and 175 M sets of fingerprints.
  • In 1989, British computer scientist Tim Berners-Lee coined the phrase "World Wide Web" combining hypertext with the Internet.
  • In 1995, the first super-computer is built.
  • In 2005 Roger Mougalas from O'Reilly Media coined the term Big Data.
  • In 2006, Hadoop is created.

From

To


The story goes on to the tune of 90 percent of available data today has been created in the last two years!

As SAS (and the computing world) moves to the cloud, the question of, "How do I deal with my data (Big and otherwise), which used to be on-prem, in the cloud?" is at the forefront of many organizations. I ran across a series of relevant articles by my colleague, Nicolas Robert, on the SAS Support Communities on SAS and data access and storage on Google Cloud Storage (GCS). This post organizes the articles so you can quickly get an overview of the various options for SAS to access data in GCS.

Accessing Google Cloud Storage (GCS) with SAS Viya 3.5 – An overview

As the title suggests, this is an overview of the series. Some basic SAS terminology and capabilities are discussed, followed by an overview of GCS data options for SAS. Options include:

  • gsutil - the "indirect" way
  • REST API - the "web" way
  • gcsfuse - the "dark" way
  • BigQuery - the "smart" way.

In the overview Nicolas provides the pros and cons of each offering to help you decide which option works best for your situation. Below is a list of subsequent articles providing technical details, specific steps for usage, and sample code for each option.

Accessing files on Google Cloud Storage (GCS) using REST

The Google Cloud Platform (GCP) provides an API for manipulating objects in Google Cloud Storage. In this article, Nicolas provides step-by-step instructions on using this API to access GCS files from SAS.

Accessing files on Google Cloud Storage (GCS) using SAS Viya 3.5 and Cloud Storage FUSE (gcsfuse)

Cloud Storage FUSE provides a command-line utility, named “gcsfuse”, which helps you mount a GCS bucket to a local directory so the bucket’s contents are visible and accessible locally like any other file. In this article, Nicolas presents rules for CLI usage, options for mounting a GCS bucket to a local directory, and SAS code for accessing the data.

SAS Viya 3.5 and Google Cloud Storage (GCS) Performance Feedback

In this article, Nicolas provides the results of a performance test of GCS integrated with SAS when accessed from cloud instances. New releases of SAS will only help facilitate integration and improve performance.

Accessing files on Google Cloud Storage (GCS) through Google BigQuery

Google BigQuery naturally interacts with Google Cloud Storage using popular big data file formats (Avro, Parquet, ORC) as well as commodity file formats like CSV and JSON. And since SAS can access Google BigQuery, SAS can access those GCS resources under the covers. In the final article, Nicolas debunks the myth that using Google BigQuery as middleware between SAS and GCS is cumbersome, not direct and requires data duplication.

Finally

Being able to access a wide variety of data on the major cloud providers' object storage technologies has become essential if not already mandatory. I encourage you to browse through the various articles, find your specific area of interest, and try out some of the detailed concepts.

* Big Data history compiled from A Short History Of Big Data, by Dr Mark van Rijmenam.

Accessing Google Cloud Storage (GCS) with SAS Viya was published on SAS Users.

11月 192020
 
SAS loves data. It's our raison d'être. We've been dealing with Big Data long before the term was first used in 2005. A brief history of Big Data*:

  • In 1887, Herman Hollerith invented punch cards and a reader to organize census data.
  • In 1937, the US government had a punch-card reading machine created to keep track of 26 M Americans and 3 M employers as a result of the Social Security Act.
  • In 1943, Colossus was created to decipher Nazi codes during World War II.
  • In 1952, the National Security Agency was created to confront decrypting intelligence signals during the Cold War.
  • In 1965, the US Government built the first data center to store 742 M tax returns and 175 M sets of fingerprints.
  • In 1989, British computer scientist Tim Berners-Lee coined the phrase "World Wide Web" combining hypertext with the Internet.
  • In 1995, the first super-computer is built.
  • In 2005 Roger Mougalas from O'Reilly Media coined the term Big Data.
  • In 2006, Hadoop is created.

From

To


The story goes on to the tune of 90 percent of available data today has been created in the last two years!

As SAS (and the computing world) moves to the cloud, the question of, "How do I deal with my data (Big and otherwise), which used to be on-prem, in the cloud?" is at the forefront of many organizations. I ran across a series of relevant articles by my colleague, Nicolas Robert, on the SAS Support Communities on SAS and data access and storage on Google Cloud Storage (GCS). This post organizes the articles so you can quickly get an overview of the various options for SAS to access data in GCS.

Accessing Google Cloud Storage (GCS) with SAS Viya 3.5 – An overview

As the title suggests, this is an overview of the series. Some basic SAS terminology and capabilities are discussed, followed by an overview of GCS data options for SAS. Options include:

  • gsutil - the "indirect" way
  • REST API - the "web" way
  • gcsfuse - the "dark" way
  • BigQuery - the "smart" way.

In the overview Nicolas provides the pros and cons of each offering to help you decide which option works best for your situation. Below is a list of subsequent articles providing technical details, specific steps for usage, and sample code for each option.

Accessing files on Google Cloud Storage (GCS) using REST

The Google Cloud Platform (GCP) provides an API for manipulating objects in Google Cloud Storage. In this article, Nicolas provides step-by-step instructions on using this API to access GCS files from SAS.

Accessing files on Google Cloud Storage (GCS) using SAS Viya 3.5 and Cloud Storage FUSE (gcsfuse)

Cloud Storage FUSE provides a command-line utility, named “gcsfuse”, which helps you mount a GCS bucket to a local directory so the bucket’s contents are visible and accessible locally like any other file. In this article, Nicolas presents rules for CLI usage, options for mounting a GCS bucket to a local directory, and SAS code for accessing the data.

SAS Viya 3.5 and Google Cloud Storage (GCS) Performance Feedback

In this article, Nicolas provides the results of a performance test of GCS integrated with SAS when accessed from cloud instances. New releases of SAS will only help facilitate integration and improve performance.

Accessing files on Google Cloud Storage (GCS) through Google BigQuery

Google BigQuery naturally interacts with Google Cloud Storage using popular big data file formats (Avro, Parquet, ORC) as well as commodity file formats like CSV and JSON. And since SAS can access Google BigQuery, SAS can access those GCS resources under the covers. In the final article, Nicolas debunks the myth that using Google BigQuery as middleware between SAS and GCS is cumbersome, not direct and requires data duplication.

Finally

Being able to access a wide variety of data on the major cloud providers' object storage technologies has become essential if not already mandatory. I encourage you to browse through the various articles, find your specific area of interest, and try out some of the detailed concepts.

* Big Data history compiled from A Short History Of Big Data, by Dr Mark van Rijmenam.

Accessing Google Cloud Storage (GCS) with SAS Viya was published on SAS Users.

9月 042020
 

As SAS Viya adoption increases among customers, many discover that it fits perfectly alongside their existing SAS implementations, which can be integrated and kept running until major projects have been migrated over. Conversely, SAS Grid Manager has been deployed during the past years to countless production sites. Because SAS Viya provides distributed computing capabilities, customers wonder how it compares to SAS Grid Manager.

SAS® Grid Manager and SAS® Viya® implement distributed computing according to different computational patterns. They can complement each other in providing a highly available and scalable environment to process large volumes of data and produce rapid results. At a high level, the questions we get the most from SAS customers can be summarized in four categories:

  1. I have SAS Viya and SAS Grid Manager. How can I get the most value from using them together?
  2. I have SAS Viya. Can I get any additional benefits by also implementing SAS Grid Manager?
  3. I have SAS Grid Manager. Should I move to SAS Viya?
  4. I am starting a new project. Which platform should I use - SAS Viya or SAS Grid Manager?

To better understand how to get the most from both an architecture and an administration perspective, I answer these questions and more in my SGF 2020 paper SAS® Grid Manager and SAS® Viya®: A Strong Relationship, and its accompanying YouTube video:

I’ve also written a three-part series with more details:

SAS Grid Manager and SAS Viya: A Strong Relationship was published on SAS Users.

9月 042020
 

As SAS Viya adoption increases among customers, many discover that it fits perfectly alongside their existing SAS implementations, which can be integrated and kept running until major projects have been migrated over. Conversely, SAS Grid Manager has been deployed during the past years to countless production sites. Because SAS Viya provides distributed computing capabilities, customers wonder how it compares to SAS Grid Manager.

SAS® Grid Manager and SAS® Viya® implement distributed computing according to different computational patterns. They can complement each other in providing a highly available and scalable environment to process large volumes of data and produce rapid results. At a high level, the questions we get the most from SAS customers can be summarized in four categories:

  1. I have SAS Viya and SAS Grid Manager. How can I get the most value from using them together?
  2. I have SAS Viya. Can I get any additional benefits by also implementing SAS Grid Manager?
  3. I have SAS Grid Manager. Should I move to SAS Viya?
  4. I am starting a new project. Which platform should I use - SAS Viya or SAS Grid Manager?

To better understand how to get the most from both an architecture and an administration perspective, I answer these questions and more in my SGF 2020 paper SAS® Grid Manager and SAS® Viya®: A Strong Relationship, and its accompanying YouTube video:

I’ve also written a three-part series with more details:

SAS Grid Manager and SAS Viya: A Strong Relationship was published on SAS Users.

4月 132020
 

Editor’s note: This is the third article in a series by Conor Hogan, a Solutions Architect at SAS, on SAS and database and storage options on cloud technologies. This article covers the SAS offerings available to connect to and interact with the various storage options available in Microsoft Azure. Access all the articles in the series here.

In this edition of the series on SAS and cloud integration, I cover the various storage options available on Microsoft Azure and how connect to and interact with them. I focus on three key storage services: object storage, block storage, and file storage. In my previous articles I have covered topics regarding database as a service (DBaaS) and storage offerings from Amazon Web Services (AWS) as well as DBaaS on Azure.

Object Storage

Azure Blob Storage is a low-cost, scalable cloud object storage service for any type of data. Objects are a great way to store large amounts of unstructured data in their native formats. Individual Azure Blob objects size up to 4.75 terabytes (TB). Azure organizes these objects into different storage accounts. Because a storage account is a globally unique namespace for your data, no two storage accounts can have the same name. The storage account supplies a unique namespace for your data and is accessible from anywhere in the world over HTTP or HTTPS.

A Container organizes a set of Blobs similar to a traditional directory in a file system. You access Azure Blobs directly through an API from anywhere in the world. For security reasons, it is vital to grant least access to a Blob.

Make sure you are being intentional about opening objects up and are not exposing any sensitive data. Security controls are offered within individual blobs and containers that organize them. The default is to create objects and blobs with no public read access, then you may grant permissions to individual users and groups.

The total cost of blob storage depends on volume of data stored, type of operations performed, data transfer costs, and data redundancy choices. You can reduce the number of replicants or use one of the various tiers of archive services to reduce the cost of your object storage. Terabytes of storage used per month determine the calculations on cost. You incur added costs for data requests and transfers over the network. Data movement is an unpredictable expense for many users.

Azure Blob Storage Tiers
Hot Frequently accessed data
Cool Infrequently accessed data – archived at least 30 days
Archive Rarely accessed data – archived at least 180 days

 
In SAS Viya 3.5, direct support is available for objects stored in Azure Data Lake Storage Gen2. Azure Data Lake Storage Gen2 extends Azure Blob Storage capabilities and optimizing it for analytics workloads. If you want to read any SAS datasets, CSV and ORC files from Azure Blob Storage, you can read them directly using a CASLIB statement to Azure Data Lake Storage (ADLS). If you have files in a different format, you can always copy them to a local file system accessible to the CAS controller. Use CAS Actions to load tables into memory. Making HTTP requests directly from within your SAS code using Proc HTTP for the download process favors automation. Remember, no restrictions exist on file types for objects moving into object storage. Hence, this may require a SAS Data Connector to read some local file system filetypes.

Block Storage

Auzre Disks is the block storage service designed for use with Azure Virtual Machines. You may only access block storage when attached to an operating system. When thinking about Azure Disks, treat the storage volumes as an independent disk drive controlled by the server operating system. Mount an Azure Disk to an operating system as if it were a physical disk. Azure Disks are valuable because they are the persisting storage when you terminate your compute instance. You can choose from four different volume types that supply performance levels at corresponding costs.

Azure makes available a choice from HDD or three different performance classes of SSD: Standard, Premium, and Ultra performance. You can use Ultra Disk if you need the lowest latency and scalable performance. Standard SDD is the most cost effective while Premium SSD is the high-performance disk offering. The table below sums up four offerings.

Azure Disk Storage Types
Standard HDD Standard SDD Premium SDD Ultra SDD
Backups and Non critical Development or Test environments and lightly used workloads Production environments and time sensitive workloads High throughput and IOPS - Transaction heavy workloads

 
Azure Disks are the permanent SAS data storage, persisting through a restart of your SAS environment. The disk performance used when selecting from the different Azure Disk type has a direct impact on the performance you get from SAS. A best practice is to use compute instances with enhanced Azure Disks performance or dedicated solid state drive instance storage.

File Storage

Azure Files provides access to data through a shared file system. The elastic network file system grows and shrinks as you add or remove files, so you only pay for the storage you consume. Users create, delete, modify, read, and write files organized logically in a directory structure for intuitive access. This service allows simultaneous access for multiple users to a common set of files data managed by user and group permissions.

Azure Files is a powerful tool, especially if utilizing a SAS Grid architecture. If you have a requirement in your SAS architecture for a shared location where any node in a group can access and write to, then Azure Files could meet your requirement. To access the data stored in your network file system you will have to mount the file system to your operating system. You can mount Azure Files to any Azure Virtual Machine, or even to an on-premise server within your Azure Virtual Network. Azure Files is a fantastic way to setup a shared file system not only for your data but also to share projects and code between users.

Finally

Storage is a key component of cloud computing because it enables users to stop their compute instances while their most important data remains in place. Storage services make it much easier to manage and scale your data. For example, Blob storage is a great place to store files that you want to make available to anyone, anywhere.

Block storage drives the performance of your environment. Abundant and performant block storage is essential to making your application run against the massive scale of data that SAS is eager to consume. Block storage is where your operating system and software ultimately are installed.

File storage is a great service to attach shared file systems to your compute instances. This is a great place to collaborate or migrate file system data from one compute instance to another. SAS is a compute engine running on data.

Without a robust set up storage tools to persist that data you may not get the performance that you desire or the progress you make will be lost when you shut down your compute instances.

Resources

Storage in the Cloud – SAS and Azure was published on SAS Users.

3月 182020
 

Let’s be honest, there is a lot of SAS content available on the web. Sometimes it gets difficult to navigate through everything to find what you need, especially if you are looking for complimentary resources.

Training budgets can be limited or already used for the year, but you’re still interested in learning a new SAS product or diving deeper into a specific subject to facilitate any current projects you are working on. Or you’re a real over-achiever (go, you!) and you’re looking to expand your personal SAS skills outside of your day-to-day work.

You start asking, “How do I find what I need?”

Don’t worry, SAS has you covered!

SAS learn & support

Let’s start with a favorite resource (in a Customer Success Manager’s opinion) – SAS’ learn and support pages. SAS recently released updated learn and support pages for SAS products. These pages provide a great overview of SAS’ product offerings, and they provide resources for those who are new to SAS or those looking to expand their knowledge. The learn and support pages cover the most current product release, information on getting started, tutorials, training courses, books, and documentation for current and past releases.

Not sure how to locate the learn and support page for the SAS product you are using? Search the SAS Product Support A to Z page and select the product of your choice.

SAS documentation

Browsing the web for resources is a great way to find answers to your SAS questions. But as mentioned previously, it can sometimes get tricky to find what you are looking for.

A great place to start your search is on the SAS documentation site. You can use the search bar to enter what you are looking for, or browse by products, titles or system requirements.

What’s new in SAS

You may have heard the saying, “There are three ways to do anything in SAS.” (Or four, or five or six!) Which raises the question, “How do I know what I’m doing is the most efficient?”

One way to stay on top of the most efficient way to do things is to stay current with your SAS knowledge. Knowing what’s new in SAS helps users know and understand what new features and enhancements are available. When a SAS product release occurs, SAS provides documentation on what’s new.

To know what’s new in the SAS release you’re using, check out the What’s New documentation. The documentation is broken into two parts: SAS 9.4 and SAS Viya 3.5. You can use the ‘Version’ tab on the left-hand side of the page to select the version currently installed at your organization.

If you are not sure what version you are running, you can run PROC PRODUCT_STATUS. This PROC will return what version numbers are running for the SAS products installed.

proc product_status;
run;

Another great resource to stay on top of what’s new from SAS is to check out SAS webinars. SAS offers live and on-demand webinars hosted by SAS experts. There are topics for every level of SAS user and every level of an organization, from SAS programmers to executives.

To attend a live webinar, select the webinar of your choice, register to attend, and you will be sent an email with the calendar invite.

If you’re interested in checking out an on-demand webinar, you can search by topic or industry to find a topic that fits what you’re looking for.

Looking for a webinar that focuses on a SAS tool? Check out the SAS Ask the Expert webinars. These are one-hour live and on-demand webinars for SAS users and administrators. The sessions cover a wide range of topics from what’s new in new releases of SAS products, to overviews on getting started, to tips and tricks that help take your SAS knowledge to the next level.

With SAS’ extensive catalog of webinars to choose from you will be a SAS pro in no time!

SAS training and education

Did you know that SAS offers free e-learning for some of our training courses? These courses are self-paced and cover a wide range of topics. With 180 days of access to these courses, it allows you to work through them at your own speed. It’s also very easy to get started!

Step 1: Select a course from the course library

Step 2: Sign into your SAS profile or create one

Step 3: Activate your product(s) and review the License Agreement

Step 4: Work through the course lessons

Step 5: Complete the course and receive your SAS digital Learn Badge and Course Completion Certificate

Leverage expertise worldwide

SAS recently released SAS Analytics Explorer. This is an interactive way to connect with other SAS professionals, expand your SAS knowledge, and access private SAS events and resource all while earning points that can be exchanged for rewards.

Are you up for the challenge? No really, are you? The SAS Analytics Explorer has fun and educational challenges that allow you to showcase your SAS skills to climb the ranks in the network. Show off your SAS talent and get some cool rewards while you’re at it!

Interested in joining? Fill out the form on the bottom of the SAS Analytics Explorer page to request an invitation.

Don’t forget about the SAS Communities! Connect with other SAS professionals and experts to ask questions, assist other SAS professionals with their questions, connect with users, and see what’s going on at SAS.

You can also connect with SAS on our website using the chat feature. We love SAS users, and we are here to help you!

Tips and resources for making the most of your SAS experience was published on SAS Users.