sas books

1月 132020
 

Are you ready to get a jump start on the new year? If you’ve been wanting to brush up your SAS skills or learn something new, there’s no time like a new decade to start! SAS Press is releasing several new books in the upcoming months to help you stay on top of the latest trends and updates. Whether you are a beginner who is just starting to learn SAS or a seasoned professional, we have plenty of content to keep you at the top of your game.

Here is a sneak peek at what’s coming next from SAS Press.
 
 

For students and beginners

For beginners, we have Exercises and Projects for The Little SAS® Book: A Primer, Sixth Edition, the best-selling workbook companion to The Little SAS Book by Rebecca Ottesen, Lora Delwiche, and Susan Slaughter. Exercises and Projects for The Little SAS® Book, Sixth Edition will be updated to match the updates to the new The Little SAS® Book: A Primer, Sixth Edition. This hands-on workbook is designed to hone your SAS skills whether you are a student or a professional.

 

 

For data explorers of all levels

This free e-book explores the features of SAS® Visual Data Mining and Machine Learning, powered by SAS® Viya®. Users of all skill levels can visually explore data on their own while drawing on powerful in-memory technologies for faster analytic computations and discoveries. You can manually program with custom code or use the features in SAS® Studio, Model Studio, and SAS® Visual Analytics to automate your data manipulation and modeling. These programs offer a flexible, easy-to-use, self-service environment that can scale on an enterprise-wide level. This book introduces some of the many features of SAS Visual Data Mining and Machine Learning including: programming in the Python interface; new, advanced data mining and machine learning procedures; pipeline building in Model Studio, and model building and comparison in SAS® Visual Analytics

 

 

For health care data analytics professionals

If you work with real world health care data, you know that it is common and growing in use from sources like observational studies, pragmatic trials, patient registries, and databases. Real World Health Care Data Analysis: Causal Methods and Implementation in SAS® by Doug Faries et al. brings together best practices for causal-based comparative effectiveness analyses based on real world data in a single location. Example SAS code is provided to make the analyses relatively easy and efficient. The book also presents several emerging topics of interest, including algorithms for personalized medicine, methods that address the complexities of time varying confounding, extensions of propensity scoring to comparisons between more than two interventions, sensitivity analyses for unmeasured confounding, and implementation of model averaging.

 

For those at the cutting edge

Are you ready to take your understanding of IoT to the next level? Intelligence at the Edge: Using SAS® with the Internet of Things edited by Michael Harvey begins with a brief description of the Internet of Things, how it has evolved over time, and the importance of SAS’s role in the IoT space. The book will continue with a collection of chapters showcasing SAS’s expertise in IoT analytics. Topics include Using SAS Event Stream Processing to process real world events, connectivity, using the ESP Geofence window, applying analytics to streaming data, using SAS Event Stream Processing in a typical IoT reference architecture, the role of SAS Event Stream Manager in managing ESP deployments in an IoT ecosystem, how to use deep learning with Your IoT Digital, accounting for data quality variability in streaming GPS data for location-based analytics, and more!

 

 

 

Keep an eye out for these titles releasing in the next two months! We hope this list will help in your search for a SAS book that will get you to the next step in updating your SAS skills. To learn more about SAS Press, check out our up-and-coming titles, and to receive exclusive discounts make sure to subscribe to our newsletter.

Foresight is 2020! New books to take your skills to the next level was published on SAS Users.

1月 082020
 

Did I trick you into seeing what this blog is about with its mysterious title? I am going to talk about how to use the FIND function to search text values.

The FIND function searches for substrings in character values. For example, you might want to extract all email addresses ending in .edu from a list of email addresses. If you are a slightly older SAS programmer like me, you may be more familiar with the INDEX function. If you use only two arguments in the FIND function, the first being the string you are searching and the second being the substring you are looking for, the FIND function is identical to the INDEX function. Both of these functions will searczh the string (first argument) for the substring (second argument) and return the position where the substring starts. If the substring is not found, the function returns a zero.

The newer FIND function has several advantages over the older INDEX function. These advantages are realized by the optional third and fourth arguments to the FIND function. These two arguments allow you to specify a starting position for the search and modifiers that allow you to ignore case. You can use either of these two arguments, or both, and the order doesn't matter! How is this possible? The value for the starting position is always a numeric value and the value for the modifier is always a character value. Thus, SAS can always figure out if a value is a starting position or a modifier.

Let's look at an example

Suppose you have a SAS data set called Emails, and each observation in the data set contains a name and an email address.

Here is a listing of the SAS data set Emails:

You want to select all observations where the variable Email_Address contains .edu (ignoring case).

The program below does just that:

*Searching for .edu;
data Education;
   set Emails;
   if find(Email_Address,'.edu','i') then output;
run;
title "Listing of Data Set Education";
proc print data=Education noobs;
run;

The 'i' modifier is an instruction to ignore case. In the listing of Education below, notice that all the .edu addresses are listed, regardless of case.

Not only is the FIND function more flexible than the older INDEX function, the ignore case modifier is really handy.

For more tips on writing code and how to get started in SAS Studio, check out my book, Learning SAS by Example: A Programmer’s Guide, Second Edition. You can also download a free book excerpt. To also learn more about SAS Press, check out the up-and-coming titles and receive exclusive discounts, make sure to subscribe to the SAS Books newsletter.

Adventures of a SAS detective and the fantastic FIND function was published on SAS Users.

12月 172019
 

The next time you pick up a book, you might want to pause and think about the work that has gone into producing it – and not just from the authors!

The authors of the SAS classic, The Little SAS Book, Sixth Edition, did just that. The Acknowledgement section in the front of a book is usually short – just a few lines to thank family and significant others. In their sixth edition, authors Lora D. Delwiche and Susan J. Slaughter, took it to the next level and produced The Little SAS Book Family Tree. The authors explained:

“Over the years, many people have helped to make this book a reality. We are grateful to everyone who has contributed both to this edition, and to editions in the past. It takes a family to produce a book including reviewers, copyeditors, designers, publishing specialists, marketing specialists, and of course our editors.”

So what happens after you sign a book contract?

First you will be assigned a development editor (DE) who will answer questions and be with you every step of the way – from writing your sample chapter to publication. Your DE will discuss schedules and milestones as well as give you an authoring template, style guidelines, and any software you need to write your book.

Once you have all the resources you need, you'll write your sample chapter. This will help your DE evaluate your writing style, quality of graphics and output, structure, and any potential production issues.

The next step is submitting a draft manuscript for technical review. You'll get feedback from internal and external subject-matter experts, and then you can revise the manuscript based on this feedback. When you and your editor are satisfied with the technical content, your DE will perform a substantive edit on your manuscript, taking particular care with the structure and flow of your writing.

Once in production, your manuscript will be copy edited, and a production specialist will lay out the pages and make sure everything looks good. A graphic designer will work with you to create a cover that encompasses both our branding and your suggestions. Your book will be published in print and e-book versions and made ready for sale.

Finally, after the book is published, a marketing specialist will start promoting your book through our social media channels and other campaigns.

So the next time you pick up a book, spare a thought for the many people who have worked to make it a reality!

For more information about publishing with SAS or for our full catalogue, visit our online bookstore.

How many people does it take to publish a book? was published on SAS Users.

12月 042019
 

If you’re like me, you struggle to buy gifts. Most folks in my inner circle already have everything they need and most of what they want. Most folks, that is, except the tech-lovers. That’s because there’s always something new on the horizon. There’s always a new gadget or program. Or a new way to learn those things. If you know folks who fall into this category, and who love SAS, boy do I have some gift ideas for you:

Try SAS for free

If you know someone who is interested in SAS but doesn’t work with it on a daily basis, or someone looking to experiment in a different area of SAS, let them know about our free software trials. Who doesn’t love free? And you’ll look like a rock star when you point out that they can explore areas like SAS Data Preparation, SAS Visual Forecasting, SAS Visual Statistics and lots more, for free.

SAS University Edition

Let’s keep things in the vein of free, shall we? SAS University Edition includes SAS Studio, Base SAS, SAS/STAT, SAS/IML, SAS/ACCESS, and several time series forecasting procedures from SAS/ETS. It’s the same software used by sites around the world; that means it’s the most up-to-date statistical and quantitative methods. And it’s free for academic, noncommercial use.

Registration to SAS Global Forum 2020

Oh my gosh, you would be your loved one’s favorite person! I’ve been to many SAS Global Forums and I love seeing the excitement on someone’s face as they explore the booths, sit in on sessions, and network to their heart’s content. SAS Global Forum is the place to be for SAS professionals, thought leaders, decision makers, partners, students, and academics. There truly is something for everyone at this event for analytics enthusiasts. And who wouldn’t want to be in Washington, D.C. in the Spring? It’s cherry blossom time! Be sure to register before Jan. 29, 2020 to get early bird pricing and save $600 off the on-site registration fee.

SAS books

I worked for many years in SAS Press and saw, firsthand, how excited folks get over a new book. I mean, who doesn’t want the 6th edition of the Little SAS Book or the latest from Ron Cody? Browse more than 100 titles and find the perfect gift. Don’t forget, SAS Press is offering 25% off everything in the bookstore for the month of December! Use promo code HOLIDAYS25 at checkout when placing your order. Offer expires at midnight Tuesday, December 31, 2019 (US).

A SAS Learning subscription

Give the gift of unlimited learning with access to our selection of e-learning and video tutorials. You can give a monthly or yearly subscription. Help the special people in your life get a head start on a new career. The gift of education is one of the best gifts you can give.

SAS OnDemand for Academics

For those who don't want to install anything, but run SAS in the cloud, we offer SAS OnDemand for Academics. Users get free access to powerful SAS software for statistical analysis, data mining and forecasting. Point-and-click functionality means there’s no need to program. But if you like to program, you do can do that, too! It’s really the best of both worlds.

SAS blogs

I began this post with something free, and I’ll end it with something free: learning from our SAS blogs. Pick from areas such as customer intelligence, operations research, data science and more. You can also read content from specific regions such as Korea, Latin America, Japan and others. To get you started, here are a few posts from three of our most popular blog authors:

Chris Hemedinger, author of The SAS Dummy:

Rick Wicklin, author of The DO Loop:

Robert Allison, major contributor to Graphically Speaking:

Happy holidays and happy learning. Now go help someone geek out. And I won’t tell if you purchase a few of these things for yourself!

Gifts to give the SAS fan in your life was published on SAS Users.

12月 042019
 

If you’re like me, you struggle to buy gifts. Most folks in my inner circle already have everything they need and most of what they want. Most folks, that is, except the tech-lovers. That’s because there’s always something new on the horizon. There’s always a new gadget or program. Or a new way to learn those things. If you know folks who fall into this category, and who love SAS, boy do I have some gift ideas for you:

Try SAS for free

If you know someone who is interested in SAS but doesn’t work with it on a daily basis, or someone looking to experiment in a different area of SAS, let them know about our free software trials. Who doesn’t love free? And you’ll look like a rock star when you point out that they can explore areas like SAS Data Preparation, SAS Visual Forecasting, SAS Visual Statistics and lots more, for free.

SAS University Edition

Let’s keep things in the vein of free, shall we? SAS University Edition includes SAS Studio, Base SAS, SAS/STAT, SAS/IML, SAS/ACCESS, and several time series forecasting procedures from SAS/ETS. It’s the same software used by sites around the world; that means it’s the most up-to-date statistical and quantitative methods. And it’s free for academic, noncommercial use.

Registration to SAS Global Forum 2020

Oh my gosh, you would be your loved one’s favorite person! I’ve been to many SAS Global Forums and I love seeing the excitement on someone’s face as they explore the booths, sit in on sessions, and network to their heart’s content. SAS Global Forum is the place to be for SAS professionals, thought leaders, decision makers, partners, students, and academics. There truly is something for everyone at this event for analytics enthusiasts. And who wouldn’t want to be in Washington, D.C. in the Spring? It’s cherry blossom time! Be sure to register before Jan. 29, 2020 to get early bird pricing and save $600 off the on-site registration fee.

SAS books

I worked for many years in SAS Press and saw, firsthand, how excited folks get over a new book. I mean, who doesn’t want the 6th edition of the Little SAS Book or the latest from Ron Cody? Browse more than 100 titles and find the perfect gift. Don’t forget, SAS Press is offering 25% off everything in the bookstore for the month of December! Use promo code HOLIDAYS25 at checkout when placing your order. Offer expires at midnight Tuesday, December 31, 2019 (US).

A SAS Learning subscription

Give the gift of unlimited learning with access to our selection of e-learning and video tutorials. You can give a monthly or yearly subscription. Help the special people in your life get a head start on a new career. The gift of education is one of the best gifts you can give.

SAS OnDemand for Academics

For those who don't want to install anything, but run SAS in the cloud, we offer SAS OnDemand for Academics. Users get free access to powerful SAS software for statistical analysis, data mining and forecasting. Point-and-click functionality means there’s no need to program. But if you like to program, you do can do that, too! It’s really the best of both worlds.

SAS blogs

I began this post with something free, and I’ll end it with something free: learning from our SAS blogs. Pick from areas such as customer intelligence, operations research, data science and more. You can also read content from specific regions such as Korea, Latin America, Japan and others. To get you started, here are a few posts from three of our most popular blog authors:

Chris Hemedinger, author of The SAS Dummy:

Rick Wicklin, author of The DO Loop:

Robert Allison, major contributor to Graphically Speaking:

Happy holidays and happy learning. Now go help someone geek out. And I won’t tell if you purchase a few of these things for yourself!

Gifts to give the SAS fan in your life was published on SAS Users.

10月 092019
 

As a fellow student, I know that making sure you get the right books for learning a new skill can be tough. To get you started off right, I would like to share the top SAS books that professors are requesting for students learning SAS. With this inside sneak-peak, you can see what books instructors and professors are using to give new SAS users a jump-start with their SAS programming skills.

1. Learning SAS by Example: A Programmer's Guide, Second Edition

At the top of the list is Ron Cody’s Learning SAS by Example: A Programmer’s Guide, Second Edition. This book teaches SAS programming to new SAS users by building from very basic concepts to more advanced topics. Many programmers prefer examples rather than reference-type syntax, and so this book uses short examples to explain each topic. The new edition of this classic has been updated to SAS 9.4 and includes new chapters on PROC SGPLOT and Perl regular expressions. Check out this free excerpt for a glimpse into the way the book can help you summarize your data.

2. An Introduction to SAS University Edition

I cannot recommend this book highly enough for anyone starting out in data analysis. This book earns a place on my desk, within easy reach. - Christopher Battiston, Wait Times Coordinator, Women's College Hospital

The second most requested book will help you get up-and-running with the free SAS University Edition using Ron Cody’s easy-to-follow, step-by-step guide. This book is aimed at beginners who want to either use the point-and-click interactive environment of SAS Studio, or who want to write their own SAS programs, or both.

The first part of the book shows you how to perform basic tasks, such as producing a report, summarizing data, producing charts and graphs, and using the SAS Studio built-in tasks. The second part of the book shows you how to write your own SAS programs, and how to use SAS procedures to perform a variety of tasks. In order to get familiar with the SAS Studio environment, this book also shows you how to access dozens of interesting data sets that are included with the product.

For more insights into this great book, check out Ron Cody’s useful tips for SAS University Edition in this recent SAS blog.

3. The Little SAS Book: A Primer, Fifth Edition

Our third book is a classic that just keeps getting better. The Little SAS Book is essential for anyone learning SAS programming. Lora Delwiche and Susan Slaughter offer a user-friendly approach so readers can quickly and easily learn the most commonly used features of the SAS language. Each topic is presented in a self-contained two-page layout complete with examples and graphics. Also, make sure to check out some more tips on learning SAS from the authors in their blog post.

We are also excited to announce that the newest edition of The Little SAS Book is coming out this Fall! The sixth edition will be interface independent, so it won’t matter if you are using SAS Studio, SAS Enterprise Guide, or the SAS windowing environment as your programming interface. In this new edition, the authors have included more examples of creating and using permanent SAS data sets, as well as using PROC IMPORT to read data. The new edition also deemphasizes reading raw data files using the INPUT statement—a topic that is no longer covered in the new base SAS programmer certification exam. Check out the upcoming titles page for more information!

4. SAS Certification Prep Guide: Statistical Business Analysis Using SAS 9

Number four is a must-have study guide for the SAS Certified Statistical Business Analyst Using SAS 9 exam. Written for both new and experienced SAS programmers, the SAS Certification Prep Guide: Statistical Business Analysis Using SAS 9 is an in-depth prep guide for the SAS Certified Statistical Business Analyst Using SAS 9: Regression and Modeling exam. The authors step through identifying the business question, generating results with SAS, and interpreting the output in a business context. The case study approach uses both real and simulated data to master the content of the certification exam. Each chapter also includes a quiz aimed at testing the reader’s comprehension of the material presented. To learn more about this great guide, watch an interview with co-author Joni Shreve.

5. SAS for Mixed Models: Introduction and Basic Applications

Models are a vital part of analyzing research data. It seems only fitting, then, that this popular SAS title would be our fifth most popular book requested by SAS instructors. Mixed models are now becoming a core part of undergraduate and graduate programs in statistics and data science. This book is great for those with intermediate-level knowledge of SAS and covers the latest capabilities for a variety of SAS applications. Be sure to read the review of this book by Austin Lincoln, a technical writer at SAS, for great insights into a book he calls a “survival guide” for creating mixed models.

Want more?

I hope this list will help in your search for a SAS book that will get you to the next step in your SAS education goals. To learn more about SAS Press, check out our up-and-coming titles, and to receive exclusive discounts make sure to subscribe to our newsletter.

Top 5 SAS Books for Students was published on SAS Users.

9月 232019
 

The SAS Global Forum 2020 call for content is open until Sept. 30, 2019. Are you thinking of submitting a paper? If so, we have a few tips adapted from The Global English Style Guide that will help your paper shine. By following Global English guidelines, your writing will be clearer and easier to understand, which can boost the effectiveness of your communications.

Even if you’re not planning on submitting a paper and producing technical information is not your primary job function, being aware of Global English guidelines can help you communicate more effectively with your colleagues from around the world.

1. Use Short Sentences

Short sentences are less likely to contain ambiguities or complexities. For task-oriented information, try to limit your sentences to 20 words. If you have written a long sentence, break it up into two or more shorter sentences.

2. Use Complete Sentences

Incomplete sentences can be confusing for non-native speakers because the order of sentence parts is different in other languages. In addition, incomplete sentences can cause machine-translation software to produce garbled results. For example, the phrases below are fragments that may cause issues for readers:

Original: Lots of info here. Not my best, but whatever. Waiting to hear back until I do anything.
Better: There is lots of info here. It’s not my best work, but I am waiting to hear back until I do anything.

An extremely common location to encounter sentence fragments is in the introductions to lists. For example, consider the sentence introducing the list below.

The programs we use for analysis are:
• SAS Visual Analytics
• SAS Data Mining and Machine Learning
• SAS Visual Investigator

If you use an incomplete sentence to introduce a list, consider revising the sentence to be complete, then continue on to the list, as shown below.

We use the following programs in our analysis:
• SAS Visual Analytics
• SAS Data Mining and Machine Learning
• SAS Visual Investigator

3. Untangle Long Noun Phrases

A noun phrase can be a single noun, or it can consist of a noun plus one or more preceding words such as articles, pronouns, adjectives, and other nouns. For example, the following sentence contains a noun phrase with 6 words:

The red brick two-story apartment building was on fire.

Whenever possible, limit noun phrases to no more than three words while maintaining comprehensibility.

4. Expand -ED Verbs That Follow Nouns Whenever Possible

A past participle is the form of a verb that usually ends in -ed. It can be used as both the perfect and past tense of verbs as well as an adjective. This double use can be confusing for non-native English speakers. Consider the following sentence:

This is the algorithm used by the software.

In this example, the word “used” is an adjective, but it may be mistaken for a verb. Avoid using -ed verbs in ambiguous contexts. Instead, add words such as “that” or switch to the present tense to help readers interpret your meaning. A better version of the previous example sentence follows.

This is the algorithm that is used by the software.

5. Always Revise -ING Verbs That Follow Nouns

The name of this tip could have been written as “Always Revise -ING Verbs Following Nouns.” But that’s exactly what we want to avoid! If an -ING word immediately follows and modifies a noun, then either expand it or eliminate it. These constructions are ambiguous and confusing.

6. Use “That” Liberally

The word “that” is your friend! In English, the word “that” is often omitted before a relative clause. If it doesn’t feel unnatural or forced, try to include “that” before these clauses, as shown in the following example.

Original: The file you requested could not be located.

Better: The file that you requested could not be located.

7. Choose Simple, Precise Words That Have a Limited Range of Meanings

We are not often accustomed to thinking about the alternative meanings for the words we use. But consider that many words have multiple meanings. If translated incorrectly, these words could make your writing completely incomprehensible and possibly ridiculous. Consider the alternate meanings of a few of the words in the following sentences:

When you hover over the menu, a box appears.

We are deploying containers in order to scale up efficiency.

8. Don’t Use Slang, Idioms, Colloquialisms, or Figurative Language

In the UK, retail districts are called “high street.” In the US, they are called “main street.” This is just one example of how using colloquialisms can cause confusion. And Brits and Americans both speak the same language!

Especially in formal communications, keep your writing free of regional slang and idioms that cannot be easily understood by non-native English speakers. Common phrases such as “under the weather,” “piece of cake,” or “my neck of the woods” make absolutely no sense when translated literally.

We hope these Global English tips help you write your Global Forum paper, or any other communications you might produce as part of your work. For more helpful tips, read The Global English Style Guide: Writing Clear, Translatable Documentation for a Global Market by John R. Kohl.

Top 8 Global English Guidelines was published on SAS Users.

9月 082019
 


Today, September 8th, is International Literacy Day! A day celebrated by UNESCO since 1967 to emphasize the importance of literacy around the world. Here at SAS, we have decided to highlight data literacy, a critical part of our evolving knowledge as data and analytics continue to dominate the way we do business.

SAS Press author Susan Slaughter defines data literacy as, “understanding that data are not dry, dusty, abstract squiggles on a computer screen, but represent living things: people, plants, animals. You know you are fluent in a foreign language when you are comfortable speaking it and can communicate what you want to say. The same is true for data literacy; it is about reaching a level of comfort, about being able to communicate what is important to you, and about seeing the meaning behind the data.

Everyone knows that technology is becoming more and more a part of everyday life. Without data literacy, people become passive recipients; with data literacy, you can actively engage with technology. SAS calls it ‘the power to know’ and that's an accurate description.”

SAS Press has been helping users be more fluent in data literacy for almost 30 years! The Little SAS Book is about to publish its sixth edition and has been helping programmers learn SAS and analyze their data since 1995.

Free SAS Press e-books

To celebrate national literacy day and do our part in sharing about data literacy, SAS Press would like to share with you our free e-books on a range of topics related to data analytics. These books focus on topics such as text analytics, data management, AI, and Machine Learning.

Moving to the cloud?

Looking for information on SAS Viya? Download our two new free e-books on Exploring SAS Viya. Both books cover the features and capabilities of SAS Viya. SAS Viya extends the SAS platform to enable everyone – data scientists, business analysts, developers, and executives alike – to collaborate and realize innovative results faster.

Here is a list of our free e-books on SAS Viya:

Exploring SAS ®Viya®: Programming and Data Management
This first book in the series covers how to access data files, libraries, and existing code in SAS® Studio. You also will learn about new procedures in SAS Viya, how to write new code, and how to use some of the pre-installed tasks that come with SAS® Visual Data Mining and Machine Learning.

Exploring SAS® Viya®: Visual Analytics, Statistics, and Investigations
Data visualization enables decision-makers to see analytics presented visually so that they can grasp difficult concepts or identify new patterns. This book includes four visualization solutions powered by SAS Viya: SAS Visual Analytics, SAS Visual Statistics, SAS Visual Text Analytics, and SAS Visual Investigator.

Interested in learning more?

As becoming more data literate becomes increasingly more important in our daily lives, knowing where to get new information and tools to learn becomes critical to innovation and change. To stay up-to-date on new SAS Press books and our new free e-books releases, subscribe to our monthly newsletter.

Celebrating #InternationalLiteracyDay with Free SAS E-books! was published on SAS Users.

9月 072019
 

By 2020, 50% of organizations will lack sufficient AI and data literacy skills to achieve business value. – Gartner

What is data literacy?

Data literacy is the ability to read, work with, analyze, and argue with data. – Wikipedia

Data literacy is the ability to derive meaningful information from data, just as literacy in general is the ability to derive information from the written word. – WhatIs.com

Why is it important?

As data and analytics become core to the enterprise, and data becomes an organizational asset, employees must have at least a basic ability to communicate and understand conversations about data. Just as it is a given that employees are now competent in word processing and spreadsheets, the ability to “speak data” will become an integral aspect of most day-to-day jobs.

Gone will be the days when data scientists, analysts, and statisticians are the only ones “speaking data.” Valerie Logan, Senior Director Analyst, Gartner, says workforce data literacy must treat information as a second language. Just as we expect all employees today to have a basic level of computer literacy, use email, and understand spreadsheets, employees will also need to be able to understand and speak basic data.

Chris Hemedinger, author of SAS for Dummies, touched on this in his blog a skeptics guide to statistics in the media. He is old enough to remember when USA Today began publication in the early 1980s. He remembers scanning each edition for the USA Today Snapshots, a mini infographic feature that presented some statistics in a fun and interesting way. “Back then, I felt that these stats made me a little bit smarter for the day. I had no reason to question the numbers I saw, nor did I have the tools, skill, or data access to check their work.”

Chris warns that as more and more “news articles and editorial pieces often use simplified statistics to convey a message or support an argument,” we will need to learn that “statistics in the media should not be accepted at face value.” Learning to analyze and understand data and statistics will become increasingly more vital for future generations.

Best-selling SAS Press author, Ron Cody, cautions that with the augmented technology that allows non-programmers to be able to run complex programs to search databases, summarize data, and conduct statistical tests, it is vital that everyone has a basic understanding of the data and analytics behind the results. “With advances in artificial intelligence, we may be able to tell the computer our problem and let it solve it and tell us the answer.” With technology advancing so quickly with AI, we will all need to understand the data and avoid including bias into our models. Misunderstood data can negatively influence AI algorithms or interpretation of models.

The future

Tom Fisher, Senior Vice President of Business Development at SAS explains, “the convergence of model management with data management represents one of the most exciting business opportunities of the future. The merging and blending of these two disciplines should enable the elimination of bias that may occur in the collection and aggregation of data.” Initiatives such as MIT’s Data Nutrition Project address the missing step in the model development pipeline, “assessing data sets based on standard quality measures that are both qualitative and quantitative.” As Fisher concludes, “these kinds of approaches are designed to allow consumers of data, as input to models, to have a more complete understanding of the data that’s being ingested. At the end of the day, the goal of these integrated disciplines is to provide greater accuracy and comfort with the result sets that are being delivered by data scientists and data engineers.”

As the Gartner report quoted earlier notes, as organizations become more data-driven, poor data literacy will become an inhibitor to growth. But not everyone wants to be a statistician or data scientist. This is where the analogy to computer literacy parts ways. We don’t all have to have a statistics degree – AI can help. SAS is developing solutions where AI is augmented into its most sophisticated and powerful solutions to give everyone data literacy. For example, SAS® Model Manager looks at the data and the problem to suggest models. It can then choose the best model based on the user’s criteria, test the model, and score. Technology to report and explain the results, and even answer questions is under development – all in natural language! A virtual personal assistant who can “speak data” and translate.

While data literacy will become increasingly important, so too will tools to help moderate and translate the data that will continue to drive our enterprises and our lives.

Resources:
Become more data literate with our library of Getting Started with SAS, Statistics, Machine Learning, and Data Management books. Visit SAS Books.

Explore SAS Analytics Industry Solutions at sas.com/industry.

Why we need to learn how to "speak data" in a data-driven future was published on SAS Users.

7月 032019
 

One of my favorite parts of summer is a relaxing weekend by the pool. Summer is the time I get to finally catch up on my reading list, which has been building over the year. So, if expanding your knowledge is a goal of yours this summer, SAS Press has a shelf full of new titles for you to explore. To help navigate your selection we asked some of our authors what SAS books were on their reading lists for this summer?

Teresa Jade


Teresa Jade, co-author of SAS® Text Analytics for Business Applications: Concept Rules for Information Extraction Models, has already started The DS2 Procedure: SAS Programming Methods at Work by Peter Eberhardt. Teresa reports that the book “is a concise, well-written book with good examples. If you know a little bit about the SAS DATA step, then you can leverage what you know to more quickly get up to speed with DS2 and understand the differences and benefits.”
 
 
 

Derek Morgan

Derek Morgan, author of The Essential Guide to SAS® Dates and Times, Second Edition, tells us his go-to books this summer are Art Carpenter’s Complete Guide to the SAS® REPORT Procedure and Kirk Lafler's PROC SQL: Beyond the Basics Using SAS®, Third Edition. He also notes that he “learned how to use hash objects from Don Henderson’s Data Management Solutions Using SAS® Hash Table Operations: A Business Intelligence Case Study.”
 

Chris Holland

Chris Holland co-author of Implementing CDISC Using SAS®: An End-to-End Guide, Revised Second Edition, recommends Richard Zink’s JMP and SAS book, Risk-Based Monitoring and Fraud Detection in Clinical Trials Using JMP® and SAS®, which describes how to improve efficiency while reducing costs in trials with centralized monitoring techniques.
 
 
 
 
 

And our recommendations this summer?

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Summer reading – Book recommendations from SAS Press authors was published on SAS Users.