SAS Enterprise Guide

9月 182018
 

To succeed in any data-focused hackathon, you need a robust set of tools and skills – as well as a can-do attitude.  Here's what you can expect from any hackathon:

  • Messy data.   It might come from a variety of sources, and won't necessarily be organized for analytics or reporting.  That's your job.
  • Nebulous problem set. Usually the goal of a hackathon is to generate insights, improve a situation, or optimize a process. But you don't know going into it which insights you need, which process is ripe for optimization, or which situations can be improved by using data.  Hackathons are as much about discovering opportunities as they are about solving problems.
  • Team members with different viewpoints. This is a big strength of hackathons, and it can also present the biggest challenge.  Team members bring different skills and ideas.  To be successful, you need to be open to those ideas and to allowing team members to contribute in the way that best uses their skills.  Think of yourselves as the Oceans Eleven of data analytics.

In my experience, hackathons are often a great melting pot of different tools and technologies.  Whatever tech biases you might have in your day job (Windows versus Linux, SAS versus Python, JSON versus CSV) – these melt away when your teammates show up ready to contribute to a common goal using the tools that they each know best.

My favorite hackathon tools

At the Analytics Experience 2018 Hackathon, attendees have the entire suite of SAS tools available.  From Base SAS, to SAS Enterprise Guide, to SAS Studio, to SAS Enterprise Miner and the entire SAS Viya framework -- including SAS Visual Analytics, SAS Visual Text Analytics, SAS Data Mining and Machine Learning.  As we say here in San Diego, it's the whole enchilada.  As the facilitators were presenting the whirlwind tour of all of these goodies, I could see the attendees salivating.  Or maybe that was just me.

When it comes to getting my hands dirty with unknown data, my favorite path begins with SAS Enterprise Guide.  If you know me, this won't surprise you.  Here's why I like it.

Import Data task: Import any data

Hackathon data almost always comes as CSV or Excel spreadsheets.  The Import Data task can ingest CSV, fixed-width text, and Excel spreadsheets of any version.  Of course most "hackers" worth their salt can write code to read these file types, but the Import Data task helps you to discover what's in the file almost instantly.  You can review all of the field names and types, tweak them as you like, and click Finish to produce a data set.  There's no faster method of turning raw data into a SAS data set that feeds the next step.

See Tricks for importing text files and Importing Excel files using SAS Enterprise Guide for more details about the ins-and-outs of this task.  If you want to ultimately turn this step into repeatable code (a great idea for hackathons), then it's important to know how this task works.

Note: if your data is coming from a web service or API, then it's probably in JSON format.  There's no point-and-click task to read that, but a couple of SAS program lines will do the trick.

Query Builder: Filter, compute, summarize, and join

The Query Builder in SAS Enterprise Guide is a one-stop shop for data management.  Use this for quick filtering, data cleansing, simple recoding, and summarizing across groups. Later, when you have multiple data sources, the Query Builder provides simple methods to join these – merge on the fly.

Before heading into your next hackathon, it's worth exploring and practicing your skills with the Query Builder.  It can do so much -- but some of the functions are a bit hidden.  Limber up before you hack!

See this paper by Jennifer First-Kluge for an in-depth tour of the tool.

Characterize Data: Quick data characteristics, with ability to dive deeper

If you've never seen your data before, you'll appreciate this one-click method to report on variable types, frequencies, distinct values, and distributions.  The Describe->Characterize Data task provides a good start.

Using SAS Studio? There's a Characterize Data task in there as well.  See Marje Fecht's paper: Easing into Data Exploration, Reporting, and Analytics Using SAS Enterprise Guide for more about this and other tasks.

Data tasks: Advanced data reworking: long to wide, wide to long

"Long" data is typically best for reporting, while "wide" data is more suited for analytics and modeling  The process of restructuring data from long to wide (or wide to long) is called Transpose.  SAS Enterprise Guide has special tasks called "Split Data" (for making wide tables) and "Stack Data" (for making long data).  Each method has some special requirements for a successful transformation, so it's worth your time to practice with these tasks before you need them.

Program Editor: Flexible coding environment

The program editor in SAS Enterprise Guide is my favorite place to write and modify SAS code.  Here are my favorite tricks for staying productive in this environment including code formatting, shown below.

autoformat code

Have another favorite editor?  You can use SAS Enterprise Guide to open your code in your default Windows editor too.  That's a great option when you need to do super-fancy text manipulation.  (We won't go into the "best programming editor" debate here, but I've got my defaults set up for Notepad++.)

Export and share with others

The hackathon "units of sharing" are code (of course) and data.  SAS Enterprise Guide provides several simple methods to share data in a way that just about any other tool can consume:

  • Export data as CSV (CSV is the lingua franca of data sharing)
  • Export data as Excel (if that's what your teammates are using)
  • Send to Excel -- actually my favorite way to generate ad-hoc Excel data, as it automates Microsoft Excel and pipes the data your looking at directly into a new sheet.
  • Copy / paste with headers -- low-tech, but this gets you exactly the columns and fields that you want to share with another team member.

When it comes to sharing code, you can use File->Export All Code to capture all SAS code from your project or process flow.  However, I prefer to assemble my own "standalone" code piecemeal, so that I can make sure it's going to run the same for someone else as it does for me.  To accomplish this, I create a new SAS program node and copy the code for each step that I want to share into it...one after another.  Then I test by running that code in a new SAS session.  Validating your code in this way helps to reduce friction when you're sharing your work with others.

Hacking your own personal growth

The obvious benefit of hackathons is that at the end of a short, intense period of work, you have new insights and solutions that didn't have before – and might never have arrived at on your own.  But the personal benefit comes in the people you meet and the techniques that you learn.  I find that I'm able to approach my day job with fresh perspective and ideas – the creativity keeps flowing, and I'm energized to apply what I've learned in my business.

The post Essential SAS tools to bring to your next hackathon appeared first on The SAS Dummy.

8月 292018
 

The concept of "current working directory" is important within any SAS program that reads or creates external files. In SAS, when you reference a file location with a relative path (for example, "./projects/mydata.pdf"), that file reference resolves to an absolute path by way of the working directory. You can control the initial working directory by modifying the shell scripts that launch the SAS process, or by specifying the simple SAS macro that allows you to learn the current working directory. The macro uses a trick to assign a SAS fileref to the current path ('.'), grab the full path of that fileref by using Read the article for the full source (it's only about 7 lines). Here's how you would use it:

56         %put Current path is %curdir;
Current path is C:\WINDOWS\system32

As you might infer from my example here, I'm running this on a managed Windows environment. Most users cannot write to the "C:\WINDOWS\system32" path (and would not want to), so any relative file paths in my SAS code would cause errors. Maybe you've seen something like this:

25         ods html file="./test.html";
NOTE: Writing HTML Body file: ./test.html
ERROR: Insufficient authorization to access C:\WINDOWS\system32\test.html.
ERROR: No body file. HTML output will not be created.

If I want to use a relative path, I need to change the current working directory. Fortunately, there's a simple way to do that.

Change the current directory in SAS

Use the

/* working path for my projects */
%let rc = %sysfunc(dlgcdir('u:/projects'));
 
ods html file="./test.html";
proc print data=sashelp.class; run;
ods html close;

I can use my account-specific environment variables to make these paths work for all users. For example, on Windows I can reference the USERPROFILE environment variable. (On Unix, I can use the HOME environment variable instead.)

/* working path for my projects */
%let user = %sysget(USERPROFILE);
%let rc = %sysfunc(dlgcdir("&user./Documents"));
 
/* create an output data folder if needed */
options dlcreatedir;
libname outdata "./data";
 
ods html file="./test.html";
data outdata.class;
 set sashelp.class;
run;
proc print data=outdata.class; run;
ods html close;

Here's my log output. Notice how the HTML file and the output data folder are both created at locations relative to my home directory.

25         /* working path for my projects */
26         %let user = %sysget(USERPROFILE);
27         %let rc = %sysfunc(dlgcdir("&user./Documents"));
NOTE: The current working directory is now "C:\Users\sascrh\Documents".
28         
29         options dlcreatedir;
30         libname outdata "./data";
NOTE: Library OUTDATA was created.
NOTE: Libref OUTDATA was successfully assigned as follows: 
      Engine:        V9 
      Physical Name: C:\Users\sascrh\Documents\data
31         
32         ods html file="./test.html";
NOTE: Writing HTML Body file: ./test.html
33         data outdata.class;
34          set sashelp.class;
35         run;

If using SAS Enterprise Guide, you can add DLGCDIR function steps to the startup statements that run when you connect to SAS, ensuring that your working directory starts in a valid location for SAS output. You can specify those statements in Tools->Options->SAS Programs, "Submit SAS code when server is connected." A SAS administrator can also add code to the AUTOEXEC file that runs when the SAS session begins, thus helping to manage this for larger groups of SAS users.

See also

The post Manage the current directory within your SAS program appeared first on The SAS Dummy.

6月 192018
 

When making a new piece of code, I like to use the smallest font I can read. This lets me fit more text on the screen at once. When presenting code to others, especially in a classroom setting, I like to make the font large enough to see from the back of the room. Here’s how I change font size in SAS in our three programming interfaces.

The post Changing font size in SAS appeared first on SAS Learning Post.

5月 012018
 

The title of this blog says what you really need to know: SAS Enterprise Guide does have a future, and it's a bright one. Ever since SAS Studio debuted in 2014, onlookers have speculated about its impact on the development of SAS Enterprise Guide.

I think that we have been consistent with our message that SAS Enterprise Guide serves an important purpose -- a power-user interface for SAS on the desktop -- and that the product will continue to get support and new features. But that doesn't stop folks from wondering whether it might meet sudden demise like a favorite Star Wars or Game of Thrones character.

I recently recorded a session with Amy Peters, the SAS product manager for SAS Enterprise Guide and SAS Studio. Amy loves to meet with SAS users and hear their successes, their concerns, and their ideas. Her enthusiasm for SAS Enterprise Guide comes through in this video, even as I bumble my way through the prototype of the Next Big Release.

Coming soon: the features of a modern IDE

In addition to a much-needed makeover and modern appearance, the new version of SAS Enterprise Guide (scheduled for sometime in 2019) addresses many of the key requests that we hear from SAS users. First, the new version blows open the window management capabilities. You can open and view many items -- programs, data, log, results -- at the same time, and arrange those views exactly as you want. You can spread your workspace over multiple displays. And you can tear away or dock each item to suit your working style.

Screenshot of Future EG

(in development) screenshot of SAS Enterprise Guide

Second, you can decide whether you want to work with a SAS Enterprise Guide project -- or just simply write and run code. Currently you must start with a project before you can create or open anything else. The new version allows you leverage a project to organize your work...or not, depending on your need at the moment.

And finally, you can expect more alignment and collaboration features between SAS Studio and SAS Enterprise Guide. We see that more users find themselves using both interfaces for related tasks, and presenting a common experience is important. SAS Studio runs in your browser while SAS Enterprise Guide works on your desktop. Each application has different capabilities related to that, but there's no reason that they need to be so different, right?

For more information about what the future will bring, check out the communities article that recaps the SAS Global Forum 2018 presentation. It includes an attached presentation slide deck with many exciting screenshots and roadmap details. All of this is subject to change, of course (including release dates!), but I think it's safe to say the future is bright for SAS users who love their tools.

The post A productive future for SAS Enterprise Guide appeared first on The SAS Dummy.

3月 222018
 

Generating HTML output might be something that you do daily. After all, HTML is now the default format for Display Manager SAS output, and it is one of the available formats for SAS® Enterprise Guide®. In addition, SAS® Studio generates HTML 5.0 output as a default. The many faces of HTML are also seen during everyday operations, which can include the following:

  • Creating reports for the corporate intranet.
  • Creating a responsive design so that content is displayed well on all devices (including mobile devices).
  • Emailing HTML within the body of an email message.
  • Embedding figures in a web page, making the page easier to send in an email.

These tasks show the need for and the true power and flexibility of HTML. This post shows you how to create HTML outputs for each of these tasks with the Output Delivery System (ODS). Some options to use include the HTML destination (which generates HTML 4.1 output by default) or the HTML5 destination (which generates HTML 5.0 output by default).

Reports

With the HTML destination and PROC REPORT, you can create a summary report that includes drill-down data along with trafficlighting.

   ods html path="c:\temp" file="summary.html";	
 
   proc report data=sashelp.prdsale;
      column Country  Actual Predict; 
      define Country / group;
      define actual / sum;
      define predict / sum;
      compute Country;
         drillvar=cats(country,".html");
         call define(_col_,"url",drillvar);
      endcomp;
   run;
 
   ods html close;
 
   /* Create Detail data */
 
   %macro detail(country);
   ods html path="c:\temp" file="&country..html";
 
   proc report data=sashelp.prdsale(where=(country="&country"));
      column Country region product Predict Actual; 
      compute actual;
         if actual.sum >  predict.sum then 
         call define(_col_,"style","style={background=green}");
   endcomp;
   run;
 
   ods html close;
   %mend;
 
   %detail(CANADA)
   %detail(GERMANY)
%detail(U.S.A.)

Generating HTML output

In This Example

  • The first ODS HTML statement uses a COMPUTE block to create drill-down data for each Country variable. The CALL DEFINE statement within the COMPUTE block uses the URL access method.
  • The second ODS HTML statement creates targets for each of the drill-down values in the summary table by using SAS macro language to subset the data. The filename is based on the value.
  • Trafficlighting is added to the drill-down data. The added color is set to occur within a row when the data value within the Actual Sales column is larger than the data value for the Predicted Sales column.

HTML on Mobile Devices

One approach to generating HTML files is to assume that users access data from mobile devices first. Therefore, each user who accesses a web page on a mobile device should have a good experience. However, the viewport (visible area) is smaller on a mobile device, which often creates a poor viewing experience. Using the VIEWPORT meta tag in the METATEXT= option tells the mobile browser how to size the content that is displayed. In the following output, the content width is set to be the same as the device width, and the  initial-scale property controls the zoom level when the page first loads.

<meta name="viewport" content="width=device-width, initial-scale=1">

 ods html path="C:\temp" file="mobile.html" 
 metatext='name="viewport" content="width=device-width, initial-
 scale=1"';
   proc print data=sashelp.prdsale;
      title "Viewing Output Using Mobile Device";
   run;
   ods html close;

In This Example

  • The HTML destination and the METATEXT= option set the width of the output to the width of the mobile device, and the zoom level for the initial load is set.

HTML within Email

Sending SMTP (HTML) email enables you to send HTML within the body of a message. The body can contain styled output as well as embedded images. To generate HTML within email, you must set the EMAILSYS= option to SMTP, and the EMAILHOST= option must be set to the email server. To generate the email, use a FILENAME statement with the EMAIL access method, along with an HTML destination. You can add an image by using the ATTACH= option along with the INLINED= option to add a content identifier, which is defined in a later TITLE statement. For content to appear properly in the email, the CONTENT_TYPE= option must be set to text/html.

The MSOFFICE2K destination is used here instead of the HTML destination because it holds the style better for non-browser-based applications, like Microsoft Office. The ODSTEXT procedure adds the text to the message body.

   filename mymail email to="chevell.parker@sas.com"
                       subject="Forecast Report"
                       attach=('C:\SAS.png' inlined="logo")
                       content_type="text/html";   
 
   ods msoffice2k file=mymail rs=none style=htmlblue options(pagebreak="no");
     title j=l '<img src="cid:logo" width="120" height="100" />';
     title2 "Report for Company XYZ";
 
 
   proc odstext;
      H3 "Confidential!";
   run;
 
   title;   
   proc print data=sashelp.prdsale;
   run;
 
   ods msoffice2k close;

In This Example

  • The FILENAME statement with the EMAIL access method is used.
  • The ATTACH= option specifies the image to include.
  • The INLINED= option specifies a content identifier.
  • The CONTENT_TYPE= option is text/html for HTML output.
  • The ODSTEXT procedure adds the text before the table.
  • The TITLE statement defines the “logo” content identifier.

Graphics within HTML

The ODS HTML5 destination has many benefits, such as the ability to embed graphics directly in an HTML file (and the default file format is SVG). The ability to embed the figure is helpful when you need to email the HTML file, because the file is self-contained. You can also add a table of contents inline to this file.

ods graphics / height=2.5in width=4in;
ods html5 path="c:\temp" file="html5output.html";
   proc means data=sashelp.prdsale;
   run;
 
   proc sgplot data=sashelp.prdsale;
      vbar product / response=actual;
   run;
 
   ods html5 close;

In This Example

  • The ODS HTML5 statement creates a table along with an embedded figure. The image is stored as an SVG file within the HTML file.

Conclusion

HTML is used in many ways when it comes to reporting. Various ODS destinations can accommodate the specific output that you need.

The many faces of HTML was published on SAS Users.

1月 162018
 

If you are a SAS programmer, you may wonder why you should read this. After all isn’t SAS Enterprise Guide just for folks who don’t want to be bothered writing SAS code? SAS Enterprise Guide is just point, click, and get results, right? Well there is a lot more to [...]

The post SAS Enterprise Guide tools for programmers appeared first on SAS Learning Post.

12月 132017
 

I'm a big fan of the Import Data task in SAS Enterprise Guide, especially for its support of text-based files (CSV, tab delimited, fixed width, and more). There's no faster method for generating SAS code that reads your data exactly the way you need it. I use the tool so often that I take for granted some of its neatest features, and I forget that many new users (and even veteran users) might not know about them. In this article, I'll review a few of the cool things that this task can do for you.

Read fixed-width text files into SAS

We think of CSV files (and...alas...Excel files) as the main standard for data exchange among systems, but many legacy systems still produce and consume fixed-width text data formats. The SAS DATA step is a perfect tool for reading these files, but defining the columns and their properties can be tedious. The "Fixed columns" option on the Import Data task can make this job simple.

Suppose that you're beginning with a spec like this:

And a raw data file like this:

You can use the Import Data wizard to define the boundaries of your columns by adding boundary lines with just click-and-drag operations. Beginning with the File->Import Data task, select your source text file and advance to the second page of the wizard. When you select "Fixed columns" as the input text format, you'll see a layout ruler that looks like this:

Click at the column boundaries (referring to your original spec!) and drag the rule lines as needed to define those column boundaries. Then click Next, and fill out details for the column names and types:

Which then tells the Import Data task how to generate the proper INPUT statements:

When you click Finish, you end up with a data set that's ready for business:

Modify the properties for multiple columns -- with one step

Here's a click-saving trick. Sometimes you have an input data file that contains many columns that share the same properties: type, length, and SAS format. It can be tedious to click and modify the properties of each column that you want to import. There's a shortcut on the Define Field Attributes page of the wizard that you can use to change the attributes for several columns at the same time. Simply SHIFT+Click to select multiple column definitions on the page, then click Modify.... The "Field Attributes for Multiple Selections" window appears, and you can change the necessary attributes just once and apply to the many items you picked.

This trick works as you import any text file or Excel file.

Create SAS program code that you can reuse anywhere

In a previous article I described how the Import Data task works "behind the scenes." Some of the magic that the task performs is not captured in SAS code, and that can present a challenge when you want to reuse this work in other settings -- for example, in a batch process or in a larger SAS program. However, with a couple of tweaks you can coerce the Import Data task into creating SAS code that you can almost just "lift and shift," as is.

The first option is hidden under the Performance window, labeled as "Bypass the data cleansing process." By default, the Import Data task reformats your input text file to normalize it for a cleaner import step. While doing no harm, most of the time this step isn't needed -- especially if your original data file is well formed. And since this step changes the input file, it's isn't repeatable outside of this task. My first tip for the best reusable code: click Performance... on the first page of the wizard, then select the "Bypass.." checkbox. That guarantees that the code will be formulated to read your original raw file. (Note that the Performance button is available only when importing text files, not Excel files.)

The second option you'll want to change is related to this, but you'll find it on the final page with the Advanced Options. Select "Generalize import step to run outside of SAS Enterprise Guide." This ensures that the task won't attempt any behind-the-scenes monkey business with your original file -- everything is captured in the DATA step that the task generates. Well, almost everything...

The one missing piece, a confounding factor when you select a local text file to import on a remote SAS Workspace session, is the transfer of the local file to the remote server. SAS Enterprise Guide copies the file for you -- behind the scenes -- and there is no SAS code to represent this step.

You can take control of even this step, though, if you make use of the Copy Files task (now available for you on the Tasks->Data menu). You can then copy the file from a local source folder, and land it wherever you want on the SAS server. Modify your newly repurposed Import Data code to pull from that server-based destination, giving you more control over the individual steps in the import process.

Learn more about importing text files

If you're new to importing data into SAS, whether using a SAS program or SAS Enterprise Guide, you might learn some of the basics from these video tutorials that were produced by SAS instructors:

12月 132017
 

I'm a big fan of the Import Data task in SAS Enterprise Guide, especially for its support of text-based files (CSV, tab delimited, fixed width, and more). There's no faster method for generating SAS code that reads your data exactly the way you need it. I use the tool so often that I take for granted some of its neatest features, and I forget that many new users (and even veteran users) might not know about them. In this article, I'll review a few of the cool things that this task can do for you.

Read fixed-width text files into SAS

We think of CSV files (and...alas...Excel files) as the main standard for data exchange among systems, but many legacy systems still produce and consume fixed-width text data formats. The SAS DATA step is a perfect tool for reading these files, but defining the columns and their properties can be tedious. The "Fixed columns" option on the Import Data task can make this job simple.

Suppose that you're beginning with a spec like this:

And a raw data file like this:

You can use the Import Data wizard to define the boundaries of your columns by adding boundary lines with just click-and-drag operations. Beginning with the File->Import Data task, select your source text file and advance to the second page of the wizard. When you select "Fixed columns" as the input text format, you'll see a layout ruler that looks like this:

Click at the column boundaries (referring to your original spec!) and drag the rule lines as needed to define those column boundaries. Then click Next, and fill out details for the column names and types:

Which then tells the Import Data task how to generate the proper INPUT statements:

When you click Finish, you end up with a data set that's ready for business:

Modify the properties for multiple columns -- with one step

Here's a click-saving trick. Sometimes you have an input data file that contains many columns that share the same properties: type, length, and SAS format. It can be tedious to click and modify the properties of each column that you want to import. There's a shortcut on the Define Field Attributes page of the wizard that you can use to change the attributes for several columns at the same time. Simply SHIFT+Click to select multiple column definitions on the page, then click Modify.... The "Field Attributes for Multiple Selections" window appears, and you can change the necessary attributes just once and apply to the many items you picked.

This trick works as you import any text file or Excel file.

Create SAS program code that you can reuse anywhere

In a previous article I described how the Import Data task works "behind the scenes." Some of the magic that the task performs is not captured in SAS code, and that can present a challenge when you want to reuse this work in other settings -- for example, in a batch process or in a larger SAS program. However, with a couple of tweaks you can coerce the Import Data task into creating SAS code that you can almost just "lift and shift," as is.

The first option is hidden under the Performance window, labeled as "Bypass the data cleansing process." By default, the Import Data task reformats your input text file to normalize it for a cleaner import step. While doing no harm, most of the time this step isn't needed -- especially if your original data file is well formed. And since this step changes the input file, it's isn't repeatable outside of this task. My first tip for the best reusable code: click Performance... on the first page of the wizard, then select the "Bypass.." checkbox. That guarantees that the code will be formulated to read your original raw file. (Note that the Performance button is available only when importing text files, not Excel files.)

The second option you'll want to change is related to this, but you'll find it on the final page with the Advanced Options. Select "Generalize import step to run outside of SAS Enterprise Guide." This ensures that the task won't attempt any behind-the-scenes monkey business with your original file -- everything is captured in the DATA step that the task generates. Well, almost everything...

The one missing piece, a confounding factor when you select a local text file to import on a remote SAS Workspace session, is the transfer of the local file to the remote server. SAS Enterprise Guide copies the file for you -- behind the scenes -- and there is no SAS code to represent this step.

You can take control of even this step, though, if you make use of the Copy Files task (now available for you on the Tasks->Data menu). You can then copy the file from a local source folder, and land it wherever you want on the SAS server. Modify your newly repurposed Import Data code to pull from that server-based destination, giving you more control over the individual steps in the import process.

Learn more about importing text files

If you're new to importing data into SAS, whether using a SAS program or SAS Enterprise Guide, you might learn some of the basics from these video tutorials that were produced by SAS instructors:

10月 202017
 

 

“The difference between style and fashion is quality.”

-Giorgio Armani

With an out-of-the-box SAS Enterprise Guide (EG) installation, when you build a report in SAS EG it is displayed in a nice-looking default style. If you like it, you can keep it, and continue reading. If you don’t quite like it, then stop, take a deep breath, and continue reading carefully – you are about to discover a wealth of styling options available in EG. In any case, you are not bound by the default style that is set during your SAS EG installation.

Changing your SAS EG report style on the fly

Let’s say we run the following SAS program in EG:

SAS code sample to run in SAS EG
When you run a SAS Program or a Process Flow that creates an output, it will open in the Results tab shown in a default style (HtmlBlue). For many it looks quite OK. However, SAS provides many other different styles you can choose from. To change your report style, just click on Properties of the workspace toolbar:
Results tab in SAS EG
This will open the Properties for SAS Report window where you can select any style in the Style drop-down list:

Properties for SAS Report
After you selected desired style, click OK; this will save your change and close the window. Your report will immediately be redrawn and displayed in your new style:

SAS report in new style

That new style will only apply to the Results element of the SAS Program or a Process Flow you ran. If you save the EG project and then re-open it in a new EG session and re-run, EG will still remember and use the style you previously selected for the Results element. All other elements will use the default style.

But how do you know what each style’s look and feel is before you select it? The following sections show how to browse different styles as well as how to change your default styles to new ones.

Browsing SAS EG styles

SAS Enterprise Guide interface provides a quick access to viewing different styles, whether built-in or external. Here is how to get an idea of different styles look and feel.

From the EG main menu click on Tools → Style Manager. In the opened Style Manager window you may browse through the Style List by clicking on each style listed in the left pane and also get a good idea of how each particular style looks by viewing it in the right Preview pane of the Style Manager window:

Style Manager window

From Style Manager window, you can also set up a default style by selecting a style you like from the Style List in the left pane and clicking Set as Default button. However, setting your default style using Style Manager will only affect SAS Report and HTML results formats. But what about other results formats? Not to worry, SAS EG interface has you covered.

Changing your default SAS EG report style

If you like a particular report style and don’t want to be stuck with a pre-set default style and necessity to change it every time you run a report, you may easily change your SAS EG default style for practically any results format.

From the EG main menu click on Tools → Options…, the Options window will open. I that window, under Results → Results General you may select (check) one or multiple Results Formats (SAS Report, HTML, PDF, RTF, Text Output, PowerPoint, and Excel) as well as choose your Default Result Format:

Options window to choose default report format

Let’s set up default styles for different results formats. First, let’s go to Results → SAS Report, you will see (under Appearance → Style) that your default style (set up during initial EG installation) is HtmlBlue. Click on the Style drop-down list to select a different style:

Select new report style

The same way you may set up default styles for other results formats (HTML, RTF, PDF, Excel, and PowerPoint). For Graph, you may select a Graph Format (ActiveX, Java, GIF, JPEG, etc.) When you are done, click OK button, the Options window will close and your selected styles become your new default. They are going to persist across EG sessions.

If you are a SAS Administrator, to ensure consistency across your organization, you may have all your SAS Enterprise Guide users set up the same Default styles for every Result format.

Server-side style templates

Server-side SAS style templates are created using the PROC TEMPLATE of the SAS Output Delivery System (ODS) and are stored in Template Stores within SAS libraries. By definition, a template store is an item store that stores items that were created by the TEMPLATE procedure. In particular, built-in server-side SAS style templates are stored in the SASHELP.TMPLMST item store.

Note, that you will not see these item stores / template stores in the EG Server→Library tree under the SASHELP library as it only shows data tables and views. While there is no access in EG to the Templates Window, you can access the Templates Window from SAS Display Manager.

In Enterprise Guide, in order to view a list of built-in server-side SAS styles in the SASHELP.TMPLMST item store, you may run the following code:

proc template;
   path sashelp.tmplmst;
   list styles;
run;

This will produce the following listing shown in the EG’s Results tab:

Report listing

If you want to view all the server-side styles including built-in and user-defined, you can do that in EG by running the following code:

proc template;
   list styles;
run;

Server-side templates are applied to ALL Results Formats.

CSS styles

Cascading Style Sheet (CSS) styles are available only for SAS Report and HTML result formats. The CSS stylesheet only styles the browser-rendered elements. It will not change a graph image style that is generated on the server.

In the SAS code generated by EG, CSS style is specified in STYLESHEET= option of the ODS statement. It can point to any local or network accessible CSS file, for example:

STYLESHEET=(URL="file:///C:/Program%20Files/SASHome/SASEnterpriseGuide/7.1/Styles/HTMLBlue.css")

In addition, STYLESHEET= option can point to a .css file located on the Internet, for example:

STYLESHEET=(URL="https://www.sas.com/etc/designs/saswww/static.css")

Server-side styles vs. CSS styles

With SAS Enterprise Guide you create Projects, Process Flows, Programs, Tasks, Reports, etc. on your local Window machine. When you Run your Project (or any part of it), EG generates SAS code which gets sent to and executed on the SAS server, and then any visual results are sent back to EG and displayed there.

For every Result Format, a server-side style template is always applied when SAS output is generated on the SAS server.

When that SAS output is returned to SAS EG, for SAS Report and HTML result formats only, an additional optional styling is applied in a form of CSS styles that controls what your SAS Report or HTML output looks like. This CSS styling affects only HTML elements of the output and do not affect graph images that are always generated and styled on the server.

These two kinds of styles are reflected in the EG-generated SAS code that gets shipped to SAS server for execution. If you look at the Code Preview area (Program → Export → Export Program) or Log tab, you will always see ODS statement with STYLE= option that specifies the server-side style. If your selected Result Format is either SAS Report or HTML, then in addition to STYLE= option the ODS statement also contains STYLESHEET= option that specifies HTML CSS stylesheet (external file) accessible via the client.

If you select as default a built-in style (e.g. Harvest) EG will find both server version of it and CSS version of it; you will see this in the SAS log:

STYLE=Harvest
STYLESHEET=(URL="file:///C:/Program%20Files/SASHome/SASEnterpriseGuide/7.1/Styles/Harvest.css")

However, if you select as default some custom CSS or external CSS style (e.g. ABC) that does not have a match in the server template store, the server style will be set to the default server-side style HTMLBlue; you will see in the SAS log the following WARNING:

WARNING: Style ABC not found; Default style will be used instead.

This warning relates to the STYLE= option specifying the server-side style.

Adding your custom SAS EG report style

Even though SAS supplies dozens of styles for you to choose from (Built-in Styles), you can still modify existing styles and create your own custom styles for SAS Report and HTML output types only. You can do this via Style Manager.

Open Style Manager with either one of the following ways:

Tools → Style Manager

Tools → Options… → Results/SAS Reports → Manage Styles

Tools → Options… → Results/HTML → Manage Styles

Note, that style customization via Style Manager is only available for SAS Report and HTML output types.

In the left pane of the Style Manager there are 3 columns:

  1. Style representing style name;
  2. Location indicating whether it is Built-in Style (SAS-supplied CSS), My Style (your custom CSS), or External Style (any CSS - Cascading Style Sheet - on your local machine or on the Web; or a style template on a SAS server);
  3. URL showing the location of the CSS file.

Find a style in the left pane list you wish to modify. Notice that SAS-supplied built-in styles are not editable (Edit button is grayed out). First, make a copy of this style by pressing Create a Copy button. You can also make a copy of a style by right-clicking on it and selecting Create a Copy from the pop-up menu.  This will open Save Style As window where you can give it a name and select a Save in location.

Your new style appears in the Style List of the Style Manager. Click on the new style name and then press Edit button (alternatively, you may right-click on the new style name and select Edit from the pop-up menu):

Style Editor window

This will open the Style Editor window where you can modify text and border attributes, specify background and banner images, as well as assign any custom CSS property name / property value pairs.

Click OK button when you are done to return to the Style Manager. There you may even set your custom style as default, by selecting it first and then pressing the Set as Default button.

Besides editing your new style in Style Manager, you may also open your-new-style.css file in a Text Editor and edit CSS there.

Adding an external style to Enterprise Guide

You can add external styles to your Style List in the Style Manager. While in the Style Manager, click on Add button, this will open the Add New Style window:

Adding an external style

Make sure Add new external style radio box is selected. Type in a Style name for your external style and Style URL, which can be a folder/directory path name on your local machine or your network (e.g. C:\your_folder\your_css_file_name.css) or a location on the Web (e.g. http://www.some_domain.com/styles/your_special_style.css).

To make your custom styles available to all SAS EG users in your organization, you may create them as a SAS style template using PROC TEMPLATE and place on a SAS server (server-side style), see this SAS Code Sample.  In this case, you can add your custom style to the Style Manager by selecting This is a SAS server style only check box in the above Add New Style window. The Style URL field will become disabled, as it is only used to specify CSS stylesheet:

Checking This is a SAS server style only checkbox

You would select this checkbox if you only want to use server-side style (the STYLE= option is always present) and do not want to also provide and apply an optional CSS stylesheet (STYLESHEET=).

Conclusion

In this post I tried to present a comprehensive guide on using styles in SAS Enterprise Guide. Please use the Comments section below to share your experience with Enterprise Guide as it relates to reports styling.

Resources

Little SAS Enterprise Guide bookThe Little SAS Enterpriser Guide Book

Point-and-Click Style Editing in SAS® Enterprise Guide®

I Didn’t  Know SAS®  Enterprise Guide®  Could Do  That!

Creating reports in style with SAS Enterprise Guide was published on SAS Users.

9月 162017
 

A while back, I wrote about the proliferation of interfaces for writing SAS programs.  I am reposting that blog here (with a few changes) because a lot of SAS users still don’t understand that they have a choice.

These days SAS programmers have more choices than ever before about how to run SAS.  They can use the old SAS windowing enviroment (often called Display Manager because, face it, SAS windowing environment is way too vague), or SAS Enterprise Guide, or the new kid on the block: SAS StudioAll of these are included with Base SAS.

DisplayManager9-4window

Display Manager / SAS Windowing Environment

EG7-12window

SAS Enterprise Guide

SASStudio3-5window

SAS Studio

I recently asked a SAS user, “Which interface do you use for SAS programming?”

She replied, “Interface?  I just install SAS and use it.”

“You’re using Display Manager,” I explained, but she had no idea what I was talking about.

Trust me.  This person is an extremely sophisticated SAS user who does a lot of leading-edge mathematical programming, but she didn’t realize that Display Manager is not SAS.  It is just an interface to SAS.

This is where old timers like me have an advantage.  If you can remember running SAS in batch, then you know that Display Manager, SAS Enterprise Guide, and SAS Studio are just interfaces to SAS–wonderful, manna from heaven–but still just interfaces.  They are optional.  It is possible to write SAS programs in an editor such as Word or Notepad++, and copy-and-paste into one of the interfaces or submit them in batch.  In fact, here is a great blog by Leonid Batkhan describing how to use your web browser as a SAS code editor.

Each of these interfaces has advantages and disadvantages.  I’m not going to list them all here, because this is a blog not an encyclopedia, but the tweet would be

“DM is the simplest, EG has projects, SS runs in browsers.”

I have heard rumors that SAS Institute is trying to develop an interface that combines the best features of all three.  So someday maybe one of these will displace the others, but at least for the near future, all three of these interfaces will continue to be used.

So what’s your SAS interface?