sas global forum

232017
 

SAS® users have an easy and convenient way to quickly obtain useful information (referred to as metadata) about their SAS session with a number of read-only SAS DICTIONARY tables or SASHELP views. At any time during a SAS session, information about currently defined system options, libnames, tables, columns and their [...]

The post Exploring the content of the DICTIONARIES table and VSVIEW SASHELP view appeared first on SAS Learning Post.

222017
 

Editor's note: The following post is from Scott Leslie, PhD, Manager of Advanced Analytics for MedImpact Healthcare Systems, Inc. Scott will be one of the Code Doctors at SAS Global Forum 2017.

Learn more about Scott.

VISIT THE CODE CLINIC AT SASGF 2017

$0 copay, no deductible.  No waiting rooms, no outdated magazines. What kind of doctor’s office is this? While we might not be able to help with that nasty cough, SAS Code Doctors are here to help – when it comes to your SAS code, that is.

Yes, the Code Doctors return to SAS Global Forum 2017! This year the Code Clinic will have over 20 SAS experts on-call to answer your questions on syntax, SAS Solutions, best practices and concepts across a broad range of SAS topics/applications, including Base SAS, macros, report writing, ODS, SQL, SAS Enterprise Guide, statistics, and more. It’s a fantastic opportunity to review code, ask questions, develop and brainstorm with peers who have decades of experience using SAS. Bring your code on paper, a flash drive, or a laptop. We’ll have 3-4 laptops with several versions of SAS software installed: 9.1.3 to 9.4 and EG 4.1 to 7.1. And if we can’t answer your coding question at the clinic, we can easily refer you to a specialist, namely the SAS R&D section of the Quad.

So, take advantage of this personalized learning experience in the Lower Quad area of the conference. Clinic office hours are:

  • Monday 4/3, 10:00 am - 3:30 pm
  • Tuesday 4/3, 9:30 am – 2:00 pm and 3:30 pm – 6:00 pm

Here’s the detailed schedule of our all-star code doctor lineup. If you haven’t heard of these names yet, you have now...

/*Just by reading this blog…*/.

 

About Scott Leslie

Scott Leslie, PhD, is Manager of Advanced Analytics for MedImpact Healthcare Systems, Inc. with over15 years of SAS® experience in the pharmacy benefits and medical management field. His SAS knowledge areas include SAS/STAT, Enterprise Guide, and Visual Analytics. Scott presents at local, regional and international SAS user group conferences as well at various clinical and scientific conferences. He is a former executive committee member of the Western Users of SAS Software (WUSS) and contributes to the San Diego SAS Users’ Group (SANDS).

Visit the code clinic at SAS Global Forum was published on SAS Users.

172017
 

As a SAS instructor, I’m often on the road, but, in April, my work travel path is going to take me to a place I haven’t visited since I was 12 years old. The occasion?  SAS Global Forum 2017.  The location?  Walt Disney World® in Orlando. While the main conference [...]

The post Visiting Open Attractions and Open SAS appeared first on SAS Learning Post.

032017
 

Word on the proverbial technology street is that online learning is ideal for modern learners, and, at SAS, we wholeheartedly agree. In 2016, more the 80,000 SAS users trained in an online or blending learning format. In 2017, we kicked off the year with the announcement of our new SAS [...]

The post Modern learners meet modern training at SAS Global Forum 2017 appeared first on SAS Learning Post.

032017
 

Editor's note: The following post is from Emma Warrillow, Chief DiGGer at Data Insight Group Inc. (DiG). Emma is a featured speaker at SAS Global Forum 2017 and recently named as one of the Top Women in Direct Marketing by Direct Marketing News. Learn more about Emma.   “I need [...]

The post That analyst is certifiable! appeared first on SAS Learning Post.

022017
 

SAS Global Forum 2017 is just a month away and, if you’re a SAS administrator, it’s a great place to meet your peers, share your experiences and attend presentations on SAS administration tips and tricks.

SAS Global Forum 2017 takes place in Orlando FL, April 2-5. You can find more information at https://www.sas.com/en_us/events/sas-global-forum/sas-global-forum-2017.html.  This schedule is for the entire conference and include pre and post conference events.

If you’re an administrator, though, I wanted to highlight a few events that would be of particular interest to you:

On Sunday, April 2nd from 2-4 pm there is a “Helping the SAS Administrator Succeed” event. More details can be found here.

On Monday, April 3rd from 6:30-8:00 pm the SAS Users Group for Administrators (SUGA) will be hosting a Community Linkup, with panelists on hand to help answer questions from SAS administrators. Location will be in the Dolphin Level – Asia 4.

There are two post-conference tutorials for the SAS Administrators:

Introduction to SAS Grid Manager, Wednesday, April 5th from 2:30-6:30pm
SAS Metadata Security, Thursday, April 6th from 8:00am-noon
More details can be found here.

For a list of the papers on the topic of SAS Administration, you can visit this link. You will see that SAS Administration has been broken down to Architecture, Deployment, SAS Administration and Security subtopic areas.

Some of the key papers under each sub-topic area are:

Architecture
Twelve Cluster Technologies Available in SAS 9.4
Deploying SAS on Software-Defined and Virtual Storage Systems
Shared File Systems:  Determining the Best Choice for your Distributed SAS Foundation Applications
Do You have a Disaster Recovery Plan for Your SAS Infrastructure

Deployment
Pillars of a Successful SAS Implementation with Lessons from Boston Scientific
Getting the Latest and Greatest from SAS 9.4: Best Practices for Upgrades and Migrations
Migrating Large, Complex SAS Environments: In-Place versus New Build

SAS Administration
SAS Metadata Security 201:  Security Basics for a New Administrator
SAS Environment Manager: Advanced Topics
The Top Ten SAS Studio Tips for SAS Grid Manager Administrators
Implementing Capacity Management Policies on a SASLASR Analytic Server Platform: Can You Afford Not To?
Auditing in SAS Visual Analytics
SAS Viya: What it Means for SAS Administration

Security
Guidelines for Protecting Your Computer, Network, and Data from Malware Threats
Getting Started with Designing and Implementing a SAS® 9.4 Metadata and File System Security Design
SAS® Metadata Security 301: Auditing your SAS Environment
SAS® Users Audit: An Automated Approach to Metadata Reporting
SAS® Metadata Security

In addition to the breakout sessions, there is an Administration Super Demo station where short presentations will be given. The schedule for these presentations is:

Sunday, April 2nd:
17:00     Shared File Systems for SAS Grid Manager
18:00     Where to Place SAS WORK in your SAS Grid Infrastructure

Monday, April 3rd:
11:00     Hands-on Secure Socket Layer Configuration for SAS 9.4 Environment Manager
12:00     Introduction to Configuring SAS Metadata Security for Mutlitenancy
13:00     SAS Viya Overview
14:00     Accelerate your SAS Programs with GPUs
15:00     Authentication and Identity Management with SAS Viya

Tuesday, April 4th:
11:00     Accelerate your SAS Programs with GPUs
12:00     Accelerating your Analytics Adoption with the Analytics Fast Track
13:00     New Deployment Experience for SAS
14:00     Managing Authorization in SAS Viya
15:00     Clustering in SAS Viya
16:00     A Docker Container Toolbox for the Data Scientist

As you can see, there is lots for SAS Administrators to learn and opportunities for SAS Administrators to socialize with fellow SAS Administrators.

Here’s to seeing you in sunny Florida next month.

P.S. SAS administrators don’t have to go to SAS Global Forum to get help administering their environment. In addition to SAS Global Forum and the SUGA group mentioned above, you can find out more information on resources for administrators in this blog. You can also visit our new webpage devoted just to users who administer their organization’s SAS environment. You can find that page here.

Resources for SAS Administrators at SAS Global Forum 2017 … and beyond was published on SAS Users.

012017
 

Whether you are just getting started with SAS or an experienced user there are a slew of free resources you should know about. First, you can download and learn SAS for free. SAS University Edition is available for anyone who wants to learn SAS. Additionally, SAS offers many free online [...]

The post Free SAS resources that every SAS user should know about appeared first on SAS Learning Post.

252017
 

Let’s have some fun, shall we? Share your video or photo!

The SAS User Community, albeit spread around the world, is a tight-knit group. We may sit alone in our offices pounding out code, developing applications, tweaking system performance or creating reports,  but the truth is other SAS users (our colleagues at work, in online communities, and at local user group meetings), are always there to assist us, and to socialize with from time to time. We rely on our fellow SAS Users for support and companionship, as well as a resource for new ideas and techniques. Then, once each year, we join users on a global scale by gathering for a few days at SAS Global Forum.

The opportunity to strengthen and extend our bonds with other SAS Users makes SASGF a much sought-after event. We will go to great lengths to attend; by demonstrating value to our employer to secure permission, presenting content to receive a registration discount, applying for an award or scholarship, volunteering as a presenter or room coordinator, joining the Conference Team, or even becoming Conference Chair!

What might these efforts look like if we were to record metaphors for them? What I mean is, how would you represent your effort?

For example, here is a photo of two determined SAS Users negotiating a portage on Lady Evelyn River (Ontario, Canada) on their way to SAS Global Forum.

These two must really understand the value of attending!

So...

What are you willing to do to get to SAS Global Forum?!

Share your videos and photos that represent your efforts to get to SASGF in Orlando. We’ll have some fun seeing how our fellow SAS Users spend their non-SAS-coding time. I’m looking forward to seeing new faces and new places.

Simply follow @SASsoftware on Twitter and Instagram, then post your video, photo or gift. Make sure you tag your post with the #GetToSASGF and @SASsoftware. 

Share more than one, encourage your fellow SAS Users to play along. And check back often to see what your peers have shared.

Who knows, you may even see your picture or video on the Big Screen at SASGF 2017!

 

What are you willing to do to get to SAS Global Forum? was published on SAS Users.

242017
 

Editor's note: Amanda Farnsworth is Head of Visual Journalism at BBC News and a featured speaker at SAS Global Forum 2017, April 2-5, 2017 in Orlando.

There was a best selling book some years ago called “Men are from Mars and Women are from Venus.” It’s a phrase I thought about a lot when I first started my current job, not so much in the gender sense, but because it can be really challenging to bring together teams with very different experiences, skillsets and, above all, cultures.

Different strokes

In 2013, I was asked to form a new department – Visual Journalism – bringing together Online Designers, TV Designers and Online Journalists with an aptitude for graphics and visuals as well as Developers who worked with me but not for me. These included people staffing the many Language Services of the BBC World Service. The different teams produced content for the BBC News website, TV 24hr News Channels and Bulletins.

And boy, were they all different!

The digital folk were very creative but in a controlled way.  They worked with a set visual design language and liked to do this as a structured process which involved a lot of user testing focusing on what the audience would understand and how would they behave when faced with some of our visual content.

Meanwhile, those with a TV background liked to work in a much more fluid way – creative workshops and experimentation - with less audience focus, as it was so much harder to get proper audience feedback on the visual elements of a TV report that viewers would get a single chance to see and take in.

And, as everyone who has gone through change knows, it can be a scary and difficult time for many of those involved. I have always found The Transition Curve one of the most useful things I ever learnt in a management course, helping me to identify how different parts of the team might be handling change. I stuck this diagram on a filing cabinet next to my desk when I created the Visual Journalism team.

And there was one other thing: I had a predominantly TV background and I was now being asked to lead a team that was packed full of digital experts. I’d always prided myself on my technical as well as editorial ability, and now I was less technically skilled than most of the people working for me. How was I going to cope with that?

New beginnings

The first thing I did was to offer 30-minute one-on-ones with my staff.  About 60% agreed. I sent them a questionnaire to fill in in advance and asked them these  three questions:

1.    What Single Thing could we do very quickly that would change things for the better?

2.    How can the new Visual Journalism team work better together?

3.    What new tools do you need to do your job?

It proved to be a treasure trove of information with some interesting thoughts and great suggestions – here are a few examples of Q1 answers:

“A single management structure for the whole team. Sometimes different disciplines within the team clash as they are pulled in different directions by the priorities of their respective managers. This wastes time and creates unnecessary tensions.”

“Unfortunately we have a rather corrosive habit of 'rumour control' which is usually of a negative nature, particularly in this time of change and uncertainty. I think 'rumour control' can easily be reduced by providing as much information as possible ( good and bad ) so none is left to be made up!”

“I would like to see a re-evaluation of the planning area. A map that just happens to be going on air tomorrow, Should that be taking up a slot in planning? Maybe planning should be more focussed on projects that are moving us and our journalism forward. “

And from question 2:

“One word: flexibility. The teams need to absorb the concept that we have one goal, the individual outputs need to grasp this to. A respect for the established disciplines is all well and good, but tribalism needs to be left behind.”

So I had a lot of face time with a lot of staff.  They all appreciated the dedicated time, but it also gave me a chance to meet them individually. The questionnaires gave me a written record of all their top concerns which I could refer to in the coming months and use as a justification or guide for change. And I could say after six months that I had done a lot of the things they had asked for along with other things that I felt needed to be done.

In addition, I wanted the teams to meet each other.  So, we held a Speed Dating session. We made two long rows of chairs facing each other and sat TV people on one side and online people on the other.  They had one minute to say what they did and one minute to listen to the person opposite them share the same before I sounded a horn and everyone moved down one chair. It was a bit chaotic and a little hysterical to watch, but proved to be a great way of breaking the ice between the teams.

After a month in which I also immersed myself in the work of the various teams with a series of show and tells and shadowing days, and asked external stakeholders what they wanted from the new department, I drew up my vision.

It’s main message was that we were now a cross-platform team who needed to share ideas, information, skills and assets to create great, innovative content across TV and Digital.

The build phase

Even as we began the process of real change, the outside world suddenly started to move quickly. More and more of our news website traffic started to come from mobile, not desktop devices, and the distinction between what was TV and what was Digital began to blur, with the use of more video and motion graphics online. Social media platforms proliferated and became a key way of reaching an audience that didn’t usually access BBCTV or Digital content. We found ourselves on the cutting edge of where TV meets the web. And we had to make the most of it.

I began a series of internal attachments where online and TV designers learnt each other’s skills. I supplemented that with training so they could learn new software tools and design techniques. The lines between journalists and designers also began to fade, with many editorial people learning motion graphics skills for use on the increasingly important social media platforms.

I also encouraged and stood the cost of people spending a month outside the department learning how other parts of the BBC News machine worked and help spread the word that the new dynamic Visual Journalism department wanted to partner up and do big high impact, cross platform projects.

I revamped our Twitter feed, offered myself and other colleagues for public speaking at conferences and made sure we entered our best work for awards.

Quite quickly this all began to pay dividends. We won a big data journalism prize and we formed some big external partnerships with universities doing interesting research and with official bodies like the Office for National Statistics. We received a big investment for more data journalism from our Global division and from BBC Sport who wanted to do some big data led projects around the World Cup and Olympics.

Social glue was also important. We instituted a now legendary annual pot-luck Christmas lunch where the tables groaned with the amazing food people brought in to share. The Christmas jumpers are always impressive and we hold a raffle and quiz too.

There was, and still is, a major job to do just listening and looking after the staff. I make a point of praising and rewarding great work. We don’t have a great deal of flexibility on pay at the BBC, but rewards like attending international conferences, getting training opportunities and receiving some retail vouchers from the scheme the BBC runs all help.  I also always facilitate flexible working as much as is humanly possible, not just for women returning to work after maternity leave, but for caregivers, people who want to work part-time and most recently for two new dads who are going to take advantage of the paternal leave scheme and be the sole parent at home for six months while their wives return to work.

I also write an end-of-year review and look ahead to the next 12 months that I send to all staff.  It outlines achievements and great content we have made but also the aims, objectives and challenges for the year ahead.

Not all plain sailing

Of course there were and still are some issues. As the Transition Curve shows, not everyone is going to follow you and embrace the change you bring. Team members who have been expert in their fields and are happy doing what they do suddenly find they have to learn new things and can feel de-skilled.  By definition, they cannot be an immediate expert at something new that they are asked to do and that can be difficult.

As roles and responsibilities blurred, we found we had to redefine the production process for online content as people became unsure of their roles.

Meanwhile such was the external reputation of the team, we suffered a brain drain to Apple, Amazon and Adidas.

And for me, as the department grew to over 160 people when I took on responsibility for the Picture Editors who edit the video for news and current affairs reports, I had to accept I was going to be more of an enabler and provider of editorial oversight than a practitioner.  Technology was moving so fast, while I had to know and understand it, actually being able to create content myself was going to be a rare occurrence.

Conclusion

Writing this post has helped me see just how far we’ve come as a department in a few short years. It’s certainly not perfect and the challenges we face are ever–changing.  But we have now won over 25 awards across all platforms and the cross-platform vision is embedded in the teams who really enjoy learning from each other and working on projects together.

And, I have a secret weapon.  I enjoy singing pop songs at my desk everyday and of course Carols at Christmas.

Trying not to encourage me to sing is something literally everyone can unite behind.

Bringing teams together was published on SAS Users.

142017
 

When mentioning to friends that I’m going to Orlando for SAS Global Forum 2107, they asked if I would be taking my kids. Clearly my friends have not attended a SAS Global Forum before as there have been years where I never even left the hotel! My kids would NOT enjoy it… but, […]

The post Learn about SAS Studio, SAS Enterprise Guide and (drumroll) SAS Viya at SAS Global Forum 2017! appeared first on SAS Learning Post.