sas global forum

4月 302013
 

Jim Goodnight kicks off SAS Global Forum with a look back the first SAS visit to San Francisco in 1982 - when everything was big including hair, cell phones and computers! Now, small computers deliver big data and we can access that data on even smaller devices such cell phones and tablets.  Learn more about SAS Visual Analytics, CI 6 and how customers such as JPMorgan Chase and Lenovo are using SAS. Jim Davis also talks about the future of SAS and all things big - data, business intelligence and analytics. Watch it now on the livestream:

tags: Livestream, SAS Global Forum
4月 302013
 

Jim Goodnight kicks off SAS Global Forum with a look back the first SAS visit to San Francisco in 1982 - when everything was big including hair, cell phones and computers! Now, small computers deliver big data and we can access that data on even smaller devices such cell phones and tablets.  Learn more about SAS Visual Analytics, CI 6 and how customers such as JPMorgan Chase and Lenovo are using SAS. Jim Davis also talks about the future of SAS and all things big - data, business intelligence and analytics. Watch it now on the livestream:

tags: Livestream, SAS Global Forum
4月 262013
 

Editor's note: this article was originally published on The SAS Dummy blog.

In the SAS User Groups LinkedIn group, some generous "old timers" offer tips to the potentially shy newcomers for connecting with other SAS professionals at SAS Global Forum. Perhaps these folks remember their own introverted natures, and they want to encourage attendees to get the most out of their conference experience.

One group participant, David Corliss, offered an inspiring (but not unusual!) account of how he met a fellow SAS user whose specific job has a big impact on David's family. I'm sharing the story here (with David's permission).

So, I just have to tell this story about meeting a first-timer at [SAS Global Forum] 2012. I was standing in line to buy a bagel at the hotel convenience store. The person in front of me saw my badge with the tags for speaker and session coordinator - he figured I had been around a little and wondered if I would look at his schedule and make any recommendations.

Naturally, I asked what his background was and what he wanted to accomplish. He said he was a statistician with the CDC in Altanta, working on infectious diseases in the third world. Due to cost restrictions, it is common in such places to receive only partial treatments for diseases requiring lengthy treatment, such as TB. His team calculated the effectiveness of these partial treatments and made recommendations to complete the treatment should it become available later on. He wanted my advice on papers and classes to take in so he could do more to save uncounted thousands of lives....

...like that of my own daughter, adopted from Russia at age 7 and exposed to TB as a small child. I owed this first-timer as inestimable debt of gratitude as the person who determined the remedial treatment needed to keep her as safe as possible from developing TB later on.

At [SAS Global Forum], whether you are a first timer or have been there for years and years, be sure to meet as many people as you can. You never know who you are going to meet.

It's true -- you never know. I'm inspired by SAS users at every conference I attend. I hope to see you there -- and to be inspired again!

tags: SAS Global Forum
4月 262013
 

Green Stink BugMost people think that all insects are bugs, but, in fact, only species belonging to the order Hemiptera are considered by scientists to be “true bugs.”  There are about 932,000 species of insects, but only 82,000 species of true bugs.  Fortunately for us, there are a lot fewer species of SAS bugs.

SAS bugs can be classified into three general types: syntax, data, and logic.

  • Syntax errors result when your program fails to follow SAS’s rules about the way keywords are put together to make statements.
  • Data errors happen when you have a program that is syntactically sound, but the data values do not fit the program as it was written.
  • Logic errors happen when you have a program that runs, and data that fits, but the result is wrong because the program gave the wrong instructions.

Debugging is one of my favorite topics.  I  believe that debugging your programs is not only necessary, but also a good way to gain insight into how SAS works.  Once you understand why you got an error, a warning, or a note; you’ll be better able to avoid problems in the future.  In other words, people who are good debuggers are good programmers.

I’m looking forward to talking about bugs (both the SAS kind, and some of the creepy-crawly kind too) at SAS Global Forum next week.  If you will be at there, maybe you can catch my presentation.

Errors, Warnings, and Notes (Oh My!): A Practical Guide to Debugging SAS Programs

Tuesday, May 30, 3:30-4:20 Moscone Center Room 2008

I hope you can come to SAS Global Forum, but if you can’t, there are still a lot of great ways to learn and share the excitement.

You can view my paper here.

You can view the proceedings for all SGF 2013 papers here.

You can view some great presentations on SAS Global Forum Take-Out.

You can even view much of the conference live.


4月 252013
 

There's nothing like SAS Global Forum and no place like San Francisco! Everyone around me is packing up cameras and notebooks, including SAS' roving reporter Anna Brown. For those who can't make it this year, Anna's Inside SAS Global Forum video series is the next best thing to being there. From the time everyone arrives at Moscone West until the last booth is taken down, Anna will be capturing the best of this year's conference. Stay tuned to this channel to:

  • Hear what SAS executives have to say about Big Data, Visual Analytics and other hot topics
  • Recognize the work of statisticians and the International Year of Statistics
  • Meet students who benefit from your SAS Student Ambassador Program
  • Learn how one user predicts the best cricket players in the Indian Premier League
  • Watch live streaming video from sasglobalforum at livestream.com
tags: Inside SAS Global Forum, Livestream, SAS Global Forum
4月 252013
 

Three Things I Learned As a SAS Local User Group LeaderI recently had the privilege of speaking at a meeting of the Toronto Area SAS Society.  It was a great meeting, and, honestly, I’m not saying this just because I was one of the speakers.  TASS is the best run local user group I have seen.  They have found the right balance of SAS Institute and user involvement so that they can all pull together without getting in each other’s way.  I was impressed by the high level of enthusiasm and professionalism displayed, especially by Art Tabachneck and Matt Malczewski.

Attending TASS brought back memories for me, memories of the eight years that I led the Sacramento Valley SAS Users Group.  I’m proud of my record.  My goal was to have three meetings a year, and, with the help of many local SAS users, I met that goal.  We had a perfect record, in fact.  Under my leadership we held 25 successful meetings in a row.

It was fun, I worked with some great people, and, of course, I learned some things.  However, some of the things I learned surprised me.  So for all LUG leaders and for everyone who is thinking about becoming a LUG leader, I present

Three Things I Learned As a SAS Local User Group Leader

1) There is a vacuum of leadership in the world. 
Lots of people want to be followers; few want to lead.  If you have any interest in being a leader, you will find abundant opportunities.  And you don’t have to start a group (although that is not a bad idea).  There are lots of organizations (PTAs, clubs, RUGs, LUGs) just waiting for you to step into a leadership role.  Don’t make them beg.  Go ahead, volunteer!

2) You should never start anything without having an exit plan.
I hope this doesn’t sound negative because, honestly, it’s not.  It’s just a fact. The default exit plan is “I will do this for the rest of my life.”  That’s not a bad exit plan.  In fact, it’s an excellent exit plan if the thing you are starting is a marriage or, say, parenthood.  However, most people don’t want to be LUG leaders for the rest of their life.  Therefore, it behooves you to have a plan in place for passing the reins to the next leader of your LUG before you take charge.

3) You need to give yourself credit because other people might not.
For some people this comes naturally; for others it doesn’t.  If you are a modest person, then it’s time to learn how to toot your own horn.  You’re working hard. Let everyone know it!  I understand now why the governor has his picture splashed all over the state website. He’s good at giving himself credit.  You can be too.

SAS has an amazing network of users groups–international, regional, local and in-house–all of which provide great opportunities for networking and learning.  SAS Global Forum is, of course, the ultimate SAS users group, but if you can’t attend SGF, there are lots of others.  The SAS Support site lists many groups.  Why not get involved?


4月 252013
 

Three Things I Learned As a SAS Local User Group LeaderI recently had the privilege of speaking at a meeting of the Toronto Area SAS Society.  It was a great meeting, and, honestly, I’m not saying this just because I was one of the speakers.  TASS is the best run local user group I have seen.  They have found the right balance of SAS Institute and user involvement so that they can all pull together without getting in each other’s way.  I was impressed by the high level of enthusiasm and professionalism displayed, especially by Art Tabachneck and Matt Malczewski.

Attending TASS brought back memories for me, memories of the eight years that I led the Sacramento Valley SAS Users Group.  I’m proud of my record.  My goal was to have three meetings a year, and, with the help of many local SAS users, I met that goal.  We had a perfect record, in fact.  Under my leadership we held 25 successful meetings in a row.

It was fun, I worked with some great people, and, of course, I learned some things.  However, some of the things I learned surprised me.  So for all LUG leaders and for everyone who is thinking about becoming a LUG leader, I present

Three Things I Learned As a SAS Local User Group Leader

1) There is a vacuum of leadership in the world. 
Lots of people want to be followers; few want to lead.  If you have any interest in being a leader, you will find abundant opportunities.  And you don’t have to start a group (although that is not a bad idea).  There are lots of organizations (PTAs, clubs, RUGs, LUGs) just waiting for you to step into a leadership role.  Don’t make them beg.  Go ahead, volunteer!

2) You should never start anything without having an exit plan.
I hope this doesn’t sound negative because, honestly, it’s not.  It’s just a fact. The default exit plan is “I will do this for the rest of my life.”  That’s not a bad exit plan.  In fact, it’s an excellent exit plan if the thing you are starting is a marriage or, say, parenthood.  However, most people don’t want to be a LUG leader for the rest of their life.  Therefore, it behooves you to have a plan in place for passing the reins to the next leader of your LUG before you take charge.

3) You need to give yourself credit because other people might not.
For some people this comes naturally; for others it doesn’t.  If you are a modest person, then it’s time to learn how to toot your own horn.  You’re working hard. Let everyone know it!  I understand now why the governor has his picture splashed all over the state website. He’s good at giving himself credit.  You can be too.

SAS has an amazing network of users groups–international, regional, local and in-house–all of which provide great opportunities for networking and learning.  SAS Global Forum is, of course, the ultimate SAS users group, but if you can’t attend SGF, there are lots of others.  The SAS Support site lists many groups.  Why not get involved?


4月 242013
 
For many SAS users, their first experience using SAS came during college.  Using SAS as part of their coursework and research was how they developed their initial SAS skills. Given that SAS programming is now taught in many high schools across the US, some students are now entering college already equipped with basic SAS skills. Regardless of when you [...]
4月 242013
 

SAS Global Forum is like a BIG buffet of SAS knowledge, all served up in just a few days. There are so many good presentations and activities, but you cannot fit them all on your plate. You have to choose.

To make the choices easier, the SAS Global Forum committee has assembled a collection of presentations that you can take "to go". It's called SAS Global Forum Take-Out. (In some countries, you might prefer the term "take-away" -- but you get the idea.)

Hosted at Brainshark.com, these presentations are "performed" by the actual authors of select SAS Global Forum papers. You can view the slides and notes, and listen to the expert present the material -- whenever and wherever you want. And these are available to everyone -- even if you can't attend the conference.

I was fortunate enough to have a presentation selected to be part of Take-Out. It's called For All of the Hats You Wear: SAS Enterprise Guide Has Got You Covered.

I hope that I have a full and lively audience for my presentation at the conference. But I'm happy that the work I've assembled can "live on" and reach a wider set of people around the world. With Take-Out, you can always reach into the back of the SAS Global Forum "fridge" and find something fresh for your brain to munch on.

Links

SAS Global Forum Take-Out presentations on Brainshark.com

tags: SAS global forum, SAS GloFo, sasgf13