sas global forum

2月 142018
 

You might have seen a SAS Global Forum infographic floating around the web. And maybe you  wondered how you might create something similar using SAS software? If so, then this blog's for you - I have created my own version of the infographic using SAS/Graph, and I'll show you how [...]

The post Building a SAS Global Forum infographic appeared first on SAS Learning Post.

1月 132018
 

SAS Global Forum 2021 Conference ChairEach year the SAS Global Users Group Executive Board (SGUGEB) solicits applications for the SAS Global Forum Conference Chair for the conference three years from now. Individuals are identified, applications are requested, submitted applications are reviewed, candidates are interviewed, and finally a choice is made.

We are asking for interested individuals to submit their application for SAS Global Forum 2021 Conference Chair. Yep, 2021! The SGUGEB wants to ensure that each conference chair has time to learn, gather ideas, generate ideas, learn from their predecessors and determine the focus for their conference.

Three years?

Is three years really necessary? Yep! The first year you will be working with the current conference team and begin to understand all the ins and outs of planning the content, organizing the content, and delivering the content. You will play a key role on the conference team, either on the Content Advisory Team or on the Content Delivery Team. This will help you in understanding the various roles and responsibilities of each team.   In the second year, you will again play a key role on the conference team and will utilize the experience gained from the previous year to begin developing and determining your content focus, identify potential new initiatives, and begin to build your team. The third year is all about your conference and the implementation of the focus and initiatives you identified… all with the aid of your team of course.

Who are we looking for?

Good candidates should be active SAS users, authors, administrators, managers, and/or practitioners. Individuals should be active in the SAS community and other professional conferences and organizations as well. Good presentations and collaboration skills are a must. Also, candidates should have a vision on how they want to shape their conference to benefit the SAS Community. As an SASGF or Regional conference attendee, we have benefitted from the content and education we received. Those who have been a conference chair will tell you that it is an honor and a privilege to be able to shape the educational content delivered to our SAS Community.

My experience

As conference chair for SASGF 2016, I can tell you it was one of the most rewarding professional and personal experiences I have had. I was given the opportunity to work with a lot of intelligent and talented individuals who, like me, wanted to ensure that current and future SAS users have a place to learn and grow professionally. With over 5,000 attendees and Livestream content available to millions, my institution had increased visibility, I developed additional leadership skills (by chairing such a large international conference), and I got to know and spend time with some exceptional SAS users, SAS leaders and executives. The experience was worth all the time and effort I expended.

Ready to Apply

So, are you interested? If so, we invite you to peruse information about Conference Leadership and SAS Global Forum Conference Chair roles and responsibilities, as well as the many different volunteer opportunities that exist before, during and after SAS Global Forum, and then make an informed decision about whether to apply for conference chair.

I would encourage anyone interested in applying to submit an application. Information on how to apply is available here. As well, share this information with anyone you feel would make a great conference chair and remember that the application deadline is February 18, 2018.

Interested in being the SAS Global Forum 2021 Conference Chair? Apply Now! was published on SAS Users.

1月 132018
 

SAS Global Forum 2021 Conference ChairEach year the SAS Global Users Group Executive Board (SGUGEB) solicits applications for the SAS Global Forum Conference Chair for the conference three years from now. Individuals are identified, applications are requested, submitted applications are reviewed, candidates are interviewed, and finally a choice is made.

We are asking for interested individuals to submit their application for SAS Global Forum 2021 Conference Chair. Yep, 2021! The SGUGEB wants to ensure that each conference chair has time to learn, gather ideas, generate ideas, learn from their predecessors and determine the focus for their conference.

Three years?

Is three years really necessary? Yep! The first year you will be working with the current conference team and begin to understand all the ins and outs of planning the content, organizing the content, and delivering the content. You will play a key role on the conference team, either on the Content Advisory Team or on the Content Delivery Team. This will help you in understanding the various roles and responsibilities of each team.   In the second year, you will again play a key role on the conference team and will utilize the experience gained from the previous year to begin developing and determining your content focus, identify potential new initiatives, and begin to build your team. The third year is all about your conference and the implementation of the focus and initiatives you identified… all with the aid of your team of course.

Who are we looking for?

Good candidates should be active SAS users, authors, administrators, managers, and/or practitioners. Individuals should be active in the SAS community and other professional conferences and organizations as well. Good presentations and collaboration skills are a must. Also, candidates should have a vision on how they want to shape their conference to benefit the SAS Community. As an SASGF or Regional conference attendee, we have benefitted from the content and education we received. Those who have been a conference chair will tell you that it is an honor and a privilege to be able to shape the educational content delivered to our SAS Community.

My experience

As conference chair for SASGF 2016, I can tell you it was one of the most rewarding professional and personal experiences I have had. I was given the opportunity to work with a lot of intelligent and talented individuals who, like me, wanted to ensure that current and future SAS users have a place to learn and grow professionally. With over 5,000 attendees and Livestream content available to millions, my institution had increased visibility, I developed additional leadership skills (by chairing such a large international conference), and I got to know and spend time with some exceptional SAS users, SAS leaders and executives. The experience was worth all the time and effort I expended.

Ready to Apply

So, are you interested? If so, we invite you to peruse information about Conference Leadership and SAS Global Forum Conference Chair roles and responsibilities, as well as the many different volunteer opportunities that exist before, during and after SAS Global Forum, and then make an informed decision about whether to apply for conference chair.

I would encourage anyone interested in applying to submit an application. Information on how to apply is available here. As well, share this information with anyone you feel would make a great conference chair and remember that the application deadline is February 18, 2018.

Interested in being the SAS Global Forum 2021 Conference Chair? Apply Now! was published on SAS Users.

1月 102018
 

SAS Global Forum 2018 AwardsThis April, more than 5,000 SAS users and business leaders will converge on Denver CO for the premier event for SAS professionals: SAS Global Forum 2018. The event provides an excellent forum to expand your SAS knowledge and network with users of all skill levels. (Last year I found myself having lunch one day sandwiched between a consultant who had built a three-decade career around SAS and a graduate student who started using SAS three months earlier. How's that for diversity!)

And because SAS Global Forum attracts users from across the globe; in every industry imaginable; and from countless government and academic institutions, it really is a user event not to be missed. Thanks to the SAS Global Users Group Executive Board there are a couple of award programs in place to help those who might otherwise have a hard time getting to the event... well, get to the event!

New SAS® Professional Award

For relatively new SAS users who want to experience the conference for the first time, there's the New SAS® Professional Award. This award provides full-time SAS professionals with five years or less of SAS experience the opportunity to earn a free conference registration and one free pre-conference tutorial. You are eligible if you have never attended a SAS Global Forum in the past and would not otherwise be able to attend without assistance.

SAS® Global Forum International Professional Award

A similar award, the SAS® Global Forum International Professional Award, provides users outside of the 48 contiguous U.S. states a similar opportunity. To qualify for this award, you must be a full-time SAS professional who has never attended a SAS Global Forum and would not otherwise be able to attend. This award provides free registration, including meals; one free pre-conference tutorial; and an invitation to an awards recognition luncheon on Sunday, April 8.

Both awards are managed by SAS users who will assume leadership roles in future conferences.

MaryAnne DePesquo, the 2019 SAS Global Forum Chair, is in charge of the 2018 International Professional Awards, while Lisa Mendez, SAS Global Forum Chair in 2020, manages the 2018 New SAS Professional Awards. Direct questions about either program to MaryAnne or Lisa.

To be considered for either program, you must submit your application by Jan. 29, 2018. You will be notified if you received an award no later than March 5, 2018.

Hope to see you in Denver!

Apply for the New SAS Professional Award.
Apply for the SAS Global Forum International Professional Award.

Interested? Hear more from a couple of last year's award recipients

Professional Awards provide first-time attendees a chance to attend SAS Global Forum 2018 was published on SAS Users.

12月 142017
 

As you might have heard, sasCommunity.org -- a wiki-based web site that has served as a user-sourced SAS repository for over a decade -- is winding down. This was a difficult decision taken by the volunteer advisory board that runs the site. However, the decision acknowledges a new reality: SAS professionals have many modern options for sharing and promoting their professional work, and they are using those options. In 2007, the birth year of sasCommunity.org, the technical/professional networking world was very different than it is today. LinkedIn was in its infancy. GitHub didn't exist. SAS Support Communities (communities.sas.com) was an experiment just getting started with a few discussion forums. sasCommunity.org (and its amazing volunteers) blazed a trail for SAS users to connect and share, and we'll always be grateful for that.

Even with the many alternatives we now have, the departure of sasCommunity.org will leave a gap in some of our professional sharing practices. In this article, I'll share some ideas that you can use to fill this gap, and to extend the reach of your SAS knowledge beyond just your SAS community colleagues. Specifically, I'll address how you can make the biggest splash and have an enduring impact with that traditional mode of SAS-knowledge sharing: the SAS conference paper.

Extending the reach of your SAS Global Forum paper

Like many of you, I've written and presented a few technical papers for SAS Global Forum (and also for its predecessor, SUGI). With each conference, SAS publishes a set of proceedings that provide perpetual access to the PDF version of my papers. If you know what you're looking for, you can find my papers in several ways:

All of these methods work with no additional effort from me. When your paper is published as part of a SAS conference, that content is automatically archived and findable within these conference assets. But for as far as this goes, there is opportunity to do so much more.

Write an article for SAS Support Communities

ArtC's presenter page

sasCommunity.org supported the idea of "presenter pages" -- a mini-destination for information about your conference paper. As an author, you would create a page that contains the description of your paper, links to supporting code, and any other details that you wanted to lift out of the PDF version of your paper. Creating such a page required a bit of learning time with the wiki syntax, and just a small subset of paper presenters ever took the time to complete this step. (But some prolific contributors, such as Art Carpenter or Don Henderson, shared blurbs about dozens of their papers in this way.) Personally, I created a few pages on sasCommunity.org to support my own papers over the years.

SAS Support Communities offers a similar mechanism: the SAS Communities Library. Any community member can create an article to share his or her insights about a SAS related topic. A conference paper is a great opportunity to add to the SAS Communities Library and bring some more attention to your work. A communities article also serves as platform for readers to ask you questions about your work, as the library supports a commenting feature that allows for discussion.

Since sasCommunity.org has announced its retirement plans, I took this opportunity to create new articles on SAS Support Communities to address some of my previous papers. I also updated the content, where appropriate, to ensure that my examples work for modern releases of SAS. Here are two examples of presentation pages that I created on SAS Support Communities:

One of my presentations on in the SAS Communities Library

When you publish a topic in the SAS Communities Library, especially if it's a topic that people search for, your article will get an automatic boost in visitors thanks to the great search engine traffic that drives the communities site. With that in mind, use these guidelines when publishing:

  • Use relevant key words/phrases in your article title. Cute and clever titles are a fun tradition in SAS conference papers, and you should definitely keep those intact within the body of your article. But reserve the title field for a more practical description of the content you're sharing.
  • Include an image or two. Does your paper include an architecture diagram? A screen shot? A graph or plot? Use the Insert Photos button to add these to your article for visual interest and to give the reader a better idea of what's in your paper.
  • Add a snippet of code. You don't have to attach all of your sample code with hundreds of program lines, but a little bit of code can help the reader with some context. Got lots of code? We'll cover that in the next section.

To get started with the process for creating an article...see this article!

Share your code on GitHub

SAS program code is an important feature in SAS conference papers. A code snippet in a PDF-style paper can help to illustrate your points, but you cannot effectively share entire programs or code libraries within this format. Code that is locked up in a PDF document is difficult for a reader to lift and reuse. It's also impossible to revise after the paper is published.

GitHub is a free service that supports sharing and collaboration for any code-based technology, including SAS. Anyone who works with code -- data scientists, programmers, application developers -- is familiar with GitHub at least as a reader. If you haven't done so already, it might be time to create your own GitHub account and share your useful SAS code. I have several GitHub repositories (or "repos" as we GitHub hipsters say) that are related to papers, blog posts, and books that I've written. It just feels like a natural way to share code. Occasionally a reader suggests an improvement or finds a bug, and I can change the code immediately. (Alas, I cannot go back in time and change a published paper...)

A sample of conference-paper-code on my GitHub.

List your published work on your LinkedIn profile

So, you've presented your work at a major SAS conference! Your professional network needs to know this about you. You should list this as an accomplishment on your resume, and definitely on your LinkedIn profile.

LinkedIn offers a "publication" section -- perfect for listing books and papers that you've written. Or, you can add this to the "projects" section of your profile, especially if you collaborate with someone else that you want to include in this accomplishment. I have yet to add my entire back-catalog of conference papers, but I have added a few recent papers to my LinkedIn profile.

One of a few publications listed on my LinkedIn profile

Bonus step: write about your experience in a LinkedIn article

Introspection has a special sort of currency on LinkedIn that doesn't always translate well to other places. A LinkedIn article -- a long-form post that you write from a first-person perspective -- gives you a chance to talk about the deeper meaning of your project. This can include the story of inspiration behind your conference paper, personal lessons that you learned along the way, and the impact that the project had in your workplace and on your career. This "color commentary" adds depth to how others see your work and experience, which helps them to learn more about you and what drives you.

Here are a few examples of what I'm talking about:

It's not about you. It's about us

The techniques I've shared here might sound like "how to promote yourself." Of course, that's important -- we each need to take responsibility for our own self-promotion and ensure that our professional achievements shine through. But more importantly, these steps play a big role helping your content to be findable -- even "stumble-uponable" (a word I've just invented). You've already invested a tremendous amount of work into researching your topic and crafting a paper and presentation -- take it the extra bit of distance to make sure that the rest of us can't miss it.

The post How to share your SAS knowledge with your professional network appeared first on The SAS Dummy.

8月 192017
 

SAS programmers have high expectations for their coding environment, and why shouldn't they? Companies have a huge investment in their SAS code base, and it's important to have tools that help you understand that code and track changes over time. Few things are more satisfying as a SAS program that works as designed and delivers perfect results. (Oh, hyperbole you say? I don't think so.) But when your program isn't working the way it should, there are two features that can help you get back on track: a code debugger, and program revision history. Both of these capabilities are built into SAS Enterprise Guide. Program history was added in v7.1, and the debugger was added in v7.13.

I've written about the DATA step debugger before -- both as a teaching tool and as a productivity tool. In this article, I'm sharing a demo of the debugger's features, led by SAS developer Joe Flynn. Before joining the SAS Enterprise Guide development team, Joe worked in SAS Technical Support. He's very familiar with "bugs," and reported his share of them to SAS R&D. Now -- like every programmer -- Joe makes the bugs. But of course, he fixes most of them before they ever see the light of day. How does he do that? Debugging.

This video is only about 8 minutes long, but it's packed with good information. In the debugger demo, you'll learn how you can use standard debugging methods, such as breakpoints, step over and step through, watch variables, jump to, evaluate expression, and more. There is no better way to understand exactly what is causing your DATA step to misbehave.

Joe's debugger

In the program history demo (the second part of the video), you'll learn how team members can collaborate using standard source management tools (such as Git). If you establish a good practice of storing code in a central place with solid source management techniques, SAS Enterprise Guide can help you see who changed what, and when. SAS Enterprise Guide also offers a built-in code version comparison tool, which enhances your ability to find the breaking changes. You can also use the code comparison technique on its own, outside of the program history feature.

program history

Take a few minutes to watch the video, and then try out the features yourself. You don't need a Git installation to play with program history at the project level, though it helps when you want to extend that feature to support team collaboration.

See also

The post Code debugging and program history in SAS Enterprise Guide appeared first on The SAS Dummy.

5月 222017
 

Whether it is through your research, projects you tackle or by teaching, you work hard to accomplish your goals and that deserves recognition.  At SAS, we support students and lecturers who want to make an impact in their careers by given them the opportunity to attend and present at an [...]

The post Students and professors earn recognition for their work at SAS Global Forum appeared first on SAS Analytics U Blog.

4月 212017
 

Jess Ekstrom is an inspiration. When she was a sophomore in college at NC State University, Ekstrom interned at Disney World with the Make-A-Wish Foundation. One child in particular touched her life forever. Renee had brain cancer. Her family found out right before they were headed to Disney World to [...]

The post Finding meaning in the moment appeared first on SAS Analytics U Blog.

4月 182017
 

Ok, so you know how to create multiple sheets in Excel, but can anyone tell me how to control the name of the sheets when they are all created at once? In the ODS destination for Excel, the suboption SHEET_INTERVAL is set to TABLE by default.  So what does that [...]

The post How to control the name of Excel sheets when they are all created at once appeared first on SAS Learning Post.

4月 182017
 

In addition to his day job as Chief Technology Officer at SAS, Oliver Schabenberger is a committed lifelong learner. During his opening remarks for the SAS Technology Connection at SAS Global Forum 2017, Schabenberger confessed to having a persistent nervous curiosity, and insisted that he’s “learning every day.” And, he encouraged attendees to do the same, officially proclaiming lifelong learning as a primary theme of the conference and announcing a social media campaign to explore the issue with attendees.

This theme of lifelong learning served a backdrop – figuratively at first, literally once the conference began! – when Schabenberger, R&D Vice President Oita Coleman and Senior R&D Project Manager Lisa Morton sat down earlier this year to determine the focus for the Catalyst Café at SAS Global Forum 2017.

A centerpiece of SAS Global Forum’s Quad area, the Catalyst Café is an interactive space for attendees to try out new SAS technology and provide SAS R&D with insight to help guide future software development. At its core, the Catalyst Café is an incubator for innovation, making it the perfect place to highlight the power of learning.

After consulting with SAS Social Media Manager Kirsten Hamstra and her team, Schabenberger, Coleman and Morton decided to explore the theme by asking three questions related to lifelong learning, one a day during each day of the conference. Attendees, and others following the conference via social media channels, would respond using the hashtag #lifelearner. Morton then visualized the responses on a 13-foot-long by 8-foot-high wall, appropriately titled the Social Listening Mural, for all to enjoy during the event.

Questions for a #lifelearner

The opening day of the conference brought this question:

Day two featured this question:

Finally, day three, and this question:

"Committed to lifelong learning"

Hamstra said the response from the SAS community was overwhelming, with hundreds of individuals contributing.

Morton working on the Social Listening Mural at the SAS Global Forum Catalyst Café

“It was so interesting to see what people shared as their first jobs,” said Morton. “One started out as a bus boy and ended up a CEO, another went from stocking shelves to analytical consulting, and a couple said they immediately started their analytical careers by becoming data analysts right out of school.”

The “what do you want to learn next?” question brought some interesting responses as well. While many respondents cited topics you’d expect from a technically-inclined crowd – things like SAS Viya, the Go Programming Language and SASPy – others said they wanted to learn Italian, how to design websites or teach kids how to play soccer.

Morton said the connections that were made during the process was fascinating and made the creation of the mural so simple and inspiring. “The project showed me how incredibly diverse our SAS users are and what a wide variety of backgrounds and interests they have.”

In the end, Morton said she learned one thing for sure about SAS users: “It’s clear our users are just as committed to lifelong learning as we are here at SAS!”

My guess is that wherever you’ll find Schabenberger at this moment – writing code in his office, behind a book at the campus library, or discussing AI with Dr. Goodnight – he’s nodding in agreement.

The final product

Nurturing the #lifelearner in all of us was published on SAS Users.