SAS Visual Analytics

2月 252021
 

The people, the energy, the quality of the content, the demos, the networking opportunities…whew, all of these things combine to make SAS Global Forum great every year. And that is no exception this year.

Preparations are in full swing for an unforgettable conference. I hope you’ve seen the notifications that we set the date, actually multiple dates around the world so that you can enjoy the content in your region and in your time zone. No one needs to set their alarm for 1:00am to attend the conference!

Go ahead and save the date(s)…you don’t want to miss this event!

Content, content, content

We are working hard to replicate the energy and excitement of a live conference in the virtual world. But we know content is king, so we have some amazing speakers and content lined up to make the conference relevant for you. There will be more than 150 breakout sessions for business leaders and SAS users, plus the demos will allow you to see firsthand the innovative solutions from SAS, and the people who make them. I, for one, am looking forward to attending live sessions that will allow attendees the opportunity to ask presenters questions and have them respond in real time.

Our keynote speakers, while still under wraps for now, will have you on the edge of your seats (or couches…no judgement here!).

Networking and entertainment

You read that correctly. We will have live entertainment that'll have you glued to the screen. And you’ll be able to network with SAS experts and peers alike. But you don’t have to wait until the conference begins to network, the SAS Global Forum virtual community is up and running. Join the group to start engaging with other attendees, and maybe take a guess or two at who the live entertainment might be.

A big thank you

We are working hard to bring you the best conference possible, but this isn’t a one-woman show. It takes a team, so I would like to introduce and thank the conference teams for 2021. The Content Advisory Team ensures the Users Program sessions meet the needs of our diverse global audience. The Content Delivery Team ensures that conference presenters and authors have the tools and resources needed to provide high-quality presentations and papers. And, finally, the SAS Advisers help us in a multitude of ways. Thank you all for your time and effort so far!

Registration opens in April, so stay tuned for that announcement. I look forward to “seeing” you all in May.

What makes SAS Global Forum great? was published on SAS Users.

12月 172020
 

There’s nothing worse than being in the middle of a task and getting stuck. Being able to find quick tips and tricks to help you solve the task at hand, or simply entertain your curiosity, is key to maintaining your efficiency and building everyday skills. But how do you get quick information that’s ALSO engaging? By adding some personality to traditionally routine tutorials, you can learn and may even have fun at the same time. Cue the SAS Users YouTube channel.

With more than 50 videos that show personality published to-date and over 10,000 hours watched, there’s no shortage of learning going on. Our team of experts love to share their knowledge and passion (with personal flavor!) to give you solutions to those everyday tasks.

What better way to round out the year than provide a roundup of our most popular videos from 2020? Check out these crowd favorites:

Most viewed

  1. How to convert character to numeric in SAS
  2. How to import data from Excel to SAS
  3. How to export SAS data to Excel

Most hours watched

  1. How to import data from Excel to SAS
  2. How to convert character to numeric in SAS
  3. Simple Linear Regression in SAS
  4. How to export SAS data to Excel
  5. How to Create Macro Variables and Use Macro Functions
  6. The SAS Exam Experience | See a Performance-Based Question in Action
  7. How it Import CSV files into SAS
  8. SAS Certification Exam: 4 tips for success
  9. SAS Date Functions FAQs
  10. Merging Data Sets in SAS Using SQL

Latest hits

  1. Combining Data in SAS: DATA Step vs SQL
  2. How to Concatenate Values in SAS
  3. How to Market to Customers Based on Online Behavior
  4. How to Plan an Optimal Tour of London Using Network Optimization
  5. Multiple Linear Regression in SAS
  6. How to Build Customized Object Detection Models

Looking forward to 2021

We’ve got you covered! SAS will continue to publish videos throughout 2021. Subscribe now to the SAS Users YouTube channel, so you can be notified when we’re publishing new videos. Be on the lookout for some of the following topics:

  • Transforming variables in SAS
  • Tips for working with SAS Technical Support
  • How to use Git with SAS

2020 roundup: SAS Users YouTube channel how to tutorials was published on SAS Users.

12月 112020
 

In recent years, we've have seen some astronomical contracts given to professional athletes. Major League Baseball (MLB) has certainly had its share. One of its first notable “megadeals” was when Alex Rodriguez, the Seattle Mariners’ power-hitting shortstop, left the team to join the Texas Rangers in 2001. The Rangers committed [...]

Competing in the Big Leagues with or without Big Money was published on SAS Voices by Pete Berryman

12月 112020
 

In recent years, we've have seen some astronomical contracts given to professional athletes. Major League Baseball (MLB) has certainly had its share. One of its first notable “megadeals” was when Alex Rodriguez, the Seattle Mariners’ power-hitting shortstop, left the team to join the Texas Rangers in 2001. The Rangers committed [...]

Competing in the Big Leagues with or without Big Money was published on SAS Voices by Pete Berryman

12月 112020
 

In recent years, we've have seen some astronomical contracts given to professional athletes. Major League Baseball (MLB) has certainly had its share. One of its first notable “megadeals” was when Alex Rodriguez, the Seattle Mariners’ power-hitting shortstop, left the team to join the Texas Rangers in 2001. The Rangers committed [...]

Competing in the Big Leagues with or without Big Money was published on SAS Voices by Pete Berryman

11月 202020
 

If you’re like me and the rest of the conference team, you’ve probably attended more virtual events this year than you ever thought possible. You can see the general evolution of virtual events by watching the early ones from April or May and compare them to the recent ones. We at SAS Global Forum are studying the virtual event world, and we’re learning what works and what needs to be tweaked. We’re using that knowledge to plan the best possible virtual SAS Global Forum 2021.

Everything is virtual these days, so what do we mean by virtual?

Planning a good virtual event takes time, and we’re working through the process now. One thing is certain -- we know the importance of providing quality content and an engaging experience for our attendees. We want to provide attendees with the opportunity as always, but virtually, to continue to learn from other SAS users, hear about new and exciting developments from SAS, and connect and network with experts, peers, partners and SAS. Yes, I said network. We realize it won’t be the same as a live event, but we are hopeful we can provide attendees with an incredible experience where you connect, learn and share with others.

Call for content is open

One of the differences between SAS Global Forum and other conferences is that SAS users are front and center, and the soul of the conference. We can’t have an event without user content. And that’s where you come in! The call for content opened November 17 and lasts through December 21, 2020. Selected presenters will be notified in January 2021. Presentations will be different in 2021; they will be 30 minutes in length, including time for Q&A when able. And since everything is virtual, video is a key component to your content submission. We ask for a 3-minute video along with your title and abstract.

The Student Symposium is back

Calling all postsecondary students -- there’s still time to build a team for the Student Symposium. If you are interested in data science and want to showcase your skills, grab a teammate or two and a faculty advisor and put your thinking caps on. Applications are due by December 21, 2020.

Learn more

I encourage you to visit the SAS Global Forum website for up-to-date information, follow #SASGF on social channels and join the SAS communities group to engage with the conference team and other attendees.

Connect, learn and share during virtual SAS Global Forum 2021 was published on SAS Users.

10月 232020
 

[Editor's note: This post was co-authored with Fritz Lehman, COO of Zencos] In 1976, the blockbuster movie Jaws was the number one grossing film. Why? Because it had a great villain – the great white shark. The movie told a vivid (and all too familiar) story about plans gone awry [...]

Uncovering the truth about sharks with analytics was published on SAS Voices by Michelle Wells

9月 222020
 

Everyone knows that SAS has been helping programmers and coders build complex machine learning models and solve complex business problems for many years, but did you know that you can also now build machines learning models without a single line of code using SAS Viya?

SAS has been helping programmers and coders build complex machine learning models and solve complex business problems over many years.

Building on the vision and commitment to democratize analytics, SAS Viya offers multiple ways to support non-programmers and empowers people with no programming skills to get up and running quickly and build machine learning models. I touched on some of the ways this can be done via SAS Visual Analytics in my previous post on analytics for everyone with SAS Viya. In addition, SAS Viya also supports more advanced pipeline-based visual modeling via SAS Visual Data Mining and Machine Learning. The combination of these different tools within SAS Viya supporting a low-code/no-code approach to modeling makes SAS Viya an incredibly flexible and powerful analytics platform that can help drive analytics usage and adoption throughout an organization.

As analytics and machine learning become more pervasive, an analytics platform that supports a low-code/no-code approach can get more people involved, drive ongoing innovations, and ultimately accelerate digital transformation throughout an organization.

Speed

I have met my fair share of coding ninjas who blew me away with their ability to build models using keyboards with lightning speed. But when it comes to being able to quickly get an idea into a model and generate all the assessment statistics and charts, there is nothing quite like a visual approach to building machine learning models.

In SAS Viya, you can build a decision tree model literally just by dragging and dropping the relevant variables onto the canvas as shown in the animated screen flow below.

Building a machine learning model via drag and drop

In this case, we were able to quickly build a decision tree model that predicts child mortality rates around the world. Not only do we get the decision tree in all its graphics glory (on the left-hand side of the image), we also get the overall model fit measure (Average Standard Error in this case), a variable importance chart, as well as a lift chart all without having to enter a single line of code in under 5 seconds!

You also get a bunch of detailed statistical outputs, including a detailed node statistics table without having to do anything extra. This is useful for when you need to review the distribution and characteristics of specific nodes when using the decision tree.

Detailed node statistics table

 

What’s more, you can leverage the same drag-and-drop paradigm to quickly tune the model. In our case, you can do simple modifications like adding a new variable by simply dragging a new data item onto the canvas or more complex techniques like manually splitting or pruning a node just by clicking and selecting a node on the canvas. The whole model and visualization refreshes instantly as you make changes, and you get instant feedback on the outputs of your tuning actions, which can help drive rapid iteration and idea testing.

Governance and collaboration

A graphical and components-based approach to modeling also has the added benefits of providing a stronger level of governance and fostering collaboration. Building machine learning model is often a team sport, and the ability to share and reuse models easily can dramatically reduce the cost and effort involved in building and maintaining models.

SAS Visual Data Mining and Machine Learning enables users to build complex, enterprise-grade pipeline models that support sophisticated variable selection, feature engineering techniques, as well as model comparison processes all within a single, easy-to-understand, pipeline-based design framework.

Pipeline modeling using SAS VDMML

The graphical, pipeline-based modeling framework within SAS Visual Data Mining and Machine Learning leverages common components, supports self-documentation, and allows users to leverage a template-based approach to building and sharing machine learning models quickly.

More importantly, as a new user or team member who needs to review, tune or reuse someone else’s model, it is much easier and quicker to understand the design and intent of the various components of a pipeline model and make the needed changes.

It is much easier and quicker to understand the design and intent of the various components of a pipeline model.

Communication and storytelling

Finally, and perhaps most importantly, a graphical, low-code/no-code approach to building machine learning models makes it much easier to communicate both the intent and potential impact of the model. Figures and numbers represent facts, but narratives and stories convey emotion and build connections. The visual modeling approaches supported by SAS Viya enable you to tell compelling stories, share powerful ideas, and inspire valuable actions.

SAS Viya enables you to make changes and apply filters on the fly within its various visual modeling environments. With the model training process and model outputs all represented visually, it makes it extremely easy to discuss business scenarios, test hypotheses, and test modeling strategies and approaches, even with people without a deep machine learning background.

There is no question that a programmatic approach to building machine learning models offers the ultimate power and flexibility and enables data scientist to build the most complex and advanced machine learning models. But when it comes to speed, governance, and communications, a graphical, low-code/no-code approach to building machine learning definitely has a lot to offer.

To learn more about a low-code/no-code approach to building machine learning models using SAS Viya, check out my book Smart Data Discovery Using SAS® Viya®.

The value of a low-code/no-code approach to building machine learning models was published on SAS Users.

9月 222020
 

Everyone knows that SAS has been helping programmers and coders build complex machine learning models and solve complex business problems for many years, but did you know that you can also now build machines learning models without a single line of code using SAS Viya?

SAS has been helping programmers and coders build complex machine learning models and solve complex business problems over many years.

Building on the vision and commitment to democratize analytics, SAS Viya offers multiple ways to support non-programmers and empowers people with no programming skills to get up and running quickly and build machine learning models. I touched on some of the ways this can be done via SAS Visual Analytics in my previous post on analytics for everyone with SAS Viya. In addition, SAS Viya also supports more advanced pipeline-based visual modeling via SAS Visual Data Mining and Machine Learning. The combination of these different tools within SAS Viya supporting a low-code/no-code approach to modeling makes SAS Viya an incredibly flexible and powerful analytics platform that can help drive analytics usage and adoption throughout an organization.

As analytics and machine learning become more pervasive, an analytics platform that supports a low-code/no-code approach can get more people involved, drive ongoing innovations, and ultimately accelerate digital transformation throughout an organization.

Speed

I have met my fair share of coding ninjas who blew me away with their ability to build models using keyboards with lightning speed. But when it comes to being able to quickly get an idea into a model and generate all the assessment statistics and charts, there is nothing quite like a visual approach to building machine learning models.

In SAS Viya, you can build a decision tree model literally just by dragging and dropping the relevant variables onto the canvas as shown in the animated screen flow below.

Building a machine learning model via drag and drop

In this case, we were able to quickly build a decision tree model that predicts child mortality rates around the world. Not only do we get the decision tree in all its graphics glory (on the left-hand side of the image), we also get the overall model fit measure (Average Standard Error in this case), a variable importance chart, as well as a lift chart all without having to enter a single line of code in under 5 seconds!

You also get a bunch of detailed statistical outputs, including a detailed node statistics table without having to do anything extra. This is useful for when you need to review the distribution and characteristics of specific nodes when using the decision tree.

Detailed node statistics table

 

What’s more, you can leverage the same drag-and-drop paradigm to quickly tune the model. In our case, you can do simple modifications like adding a new variable by simply dragging a new data item onto the canvas or more complex techniques like manually splitting or pruning a node just by clicking and selecting a node on the canvas. The whole model and visualization refreshes instantly as you make changes, and you get instant feedback on the outputs of your tuning actions, which can help drive rapid iteration and idea testing.

Governance and collaboration

A graphical and components-based approach to modeling also has the added benefits of providing a stronger level of governance and fostering collaboration. Building machine learning model is often a team sport, and the ability to share and reuse models easily can dramatically reduce the cost and effort involved in building and maintaining models.

SAS Visual Data Mining and Machine Learning enables users to build complex, enterprise-grade pipeline models that support sophisticated variable selection, feature engineering techniques, as well as model comparison processes all within a single, easy-to-understand, pipeline-based design framework.

Pipeline modeling using SAS VDMML

The graphical, pipeline-based modeling framework within SAS Visual Data Mining and Machine Learning leverages common components, supports self-documentation, and allows users to leverage a template-based approach to building and sharing machine learning models quickly.

More importantly, as a new user or team member who needs to review, tune or reuse someone else’s model, it is much easier and quicker to understand the design and intent of the various components of a pipeline model and make the needed changes.

It is much easier and quicker to understand the design and intent of the various components of a pipeline model.

Communication and storytelling

Finally, and perhaps most importantly, a graphical, low-code/no-code approach to building machine learning models makes it much easier to communicate both the intent and potential impact of the model. Figures and numbers represent facts, but narratives and stories convey emotion and build connections. The visual modeling approaches supported by SAS Viya enable you to tell compelling stories, share powerful ideas, and inspire valuable actions.

SAS Viya enables you to make changes and apply filters on the fly within its various visual modeling environments. With the model training process and model outputs all represented visually, it makes it extremely easy to discuss business scenarios, test hypotheses, and test modeling strategies and approaches, even with people without a deep machine learning background.

There is no question that a programmatic approach to building machine learning models offers the ultimate power and flexibility and enables data scientist to build the most complex and advanced machine learning models. But when it comes to speed, governance, and communications, a graphical, low-code/no-code approach to building machine learning definitely has a lot to offer.

To learn more about a low-code/no-code approach to building machine learning models using SAS Viya, check out my book Smart Data Discovery Using SAS® Viya®.

The value of a low-code/no-code approach to building machine learning models was published on SAS Users.

8月 282020
 

Remember back to your early school days, singing with all your classmates “If you’re happy and you know it clap your hands!” and then we’d all clap our hands. Being happy back then was so simple. Today, it’s hard to get away from all the negative headlines of 2020! It’s [...]

Analyzing happiness data in 2020 was published on SAS Voices by Melanie Carey