SAS Visual Analytics

11月 202020
 

If you’re like me and the rest of the conference team, you’ve probably attended more virtual events this year than you ever thought possible. You can see the general evolution of virtual events by watching the early ones from April or May and compare them to the recent ones. We at SAS Global Forum are studying the virtual event world, and we’re learning what works and what needs to be tweaked. We’re using that knowledge to plan the best possible virtual SAS Global Forum 2021.

Everything is virtual these days, so what do we mean by virtual?

Planning a good virtual event takes time, and we’re working through the process now. One thing is certain -- we know the importance of providing quality content and an engaging experience for our attendees. We want to provide attendees with the opportunity as always, but virtually, to continue to learn from other SAS users, hear about new and exciting developments from SAS, and connect and network with experts, peers, partners and SAS. Yes, I said network. We realize it won’t be the same as a live event, but we are hopeful we can provide attendees with an incredible experience where you connect, learn and share with others.

Call for content is open

One of the differences between SAS Global Forum and other conferences is that SAS users are front and center, and the soul of the conference. We can’t have an event without user content. And that’s where you come in! The call for content opened November 17 and lasts through December 21, 2020. Selected presenters will be notified in January 2021. Presentations will be different in 2021; they will be 30 minutes in length, including time for Q&A when able. And since everything is virtual, video is a key component to your content submission. We ask for a 3-minute video along with your title and abstract.

The Student Symposium is back

Calling all postsecondary students -- there’s still time to build a team for the Student Symposium. If you are interested in data science and want to showcase your skills, grab a teammate or two and a faculty advisor and put your thinking caps on. Applications are due by December 21, 2020.

Learn more

I encourage you to visit the SAS Global Forum website for up-to-date information, follow #SASGF on social channels and join the SAS communities group to engage with the conference team and other attendees.

Connect, learn and share during virtual SAS Global Forum 2021 was published on SAS Users.

10月 232020
 

[Editor's note: This post was co-authored with Fritz Lehman, COO of Zencos] In 1976, the blockbuster movie Jaws was the number one grossing film. Why? Because it had a great villain – the great white shark. The movie told a vivid (and all too familiar) story about plans gone awry [...]

Uncovering the truth about sharks with analytics was published on SAS Voices by Michelle Wells

9月 222020
 

Everyone knows that SAS has been helping programmers and coders build complex machine learning models and solve complex business problems for many years, but did you know that you can also now build machines learning models without a single line of code using SAS Viya?

SAS has been helping programmers and coders build complex machine learning models and solve complex business problems over many years.

Building on the vision and commitment to democratize analytics, SAS Viya offers multiple ways to support non-programmers and empowers people with no programming skills to get up and running quickly and build machine learning models. I touched on some of the ways this can be done via SAS Visual Analytics in my previous post on analytics for everyone with SAS Viya. In addition, SAS Viya also supports more advanced pipeline-based visual modeling via SAS Visual Data Mining and Machine Learning. The combination of these different tools within SAS Viya supporting a low-code/no-code approach to modeling makes SAS Viya an incredibly flexible and powerful analytics platform that can help drive analytics usage and adoption throughout an organization.

As analytics and machine learning become more pervasive, an analytics platform that supports a low-code/no-code approach can get more people involved, drive ongoing innovations, and ultimately accelerate digital transformation throughout an organization.

Speed

I have met my fair share of coding ninjas who blew me away with their ability to build models using keyboards with lightning speed. But when it comes to being able to quickly get an idea into a model and generate all the assessment statistics and charts, there is nothing quite like a visual approach to building machine learning models.

In SAS Viya, you can build a decision tree model literally just by dragging and dropping the relevant variables onto the canvas as shown in the animated screen flow below.

Building a machine learning model via drag and drop

In this case, we were able to quickly build a decision tree model that predicts child mortality rates around the world. Not only do we get the decision tree in all its graphics glory (on the left-hand side of the image), we also get the overall model fit measure (Average Standard Error in this case), a variable importance chart, as well as a lift chart all without having to enter a single line of code in under 5 seconds!

You also get a bunch of detailed statistical outputs, including a detailed node statistics table without having to do anything extra. This is useful for when you need to review the distribution and characteristics of specific nodes when using the decision tree.

Detailed node statistics table

 

What’s more, you can leverage the same drag-and-drop paradigm to quickly tune the model. In our case, you can do simple modifications like adding a new variable by simply dragging a new data item onto the canvas or more complex techniques like manually splitting or pruning a node just by clicking and selecting a node on the canvas. The whole model and visualization refreshes instantly as you make changes, and you get instant feedback on the outputs of your tuning actions, which can help drive rapid iteration and idea testing.

Governance and collaboration

A graphical and components-based approach to modeling also has the added benefits of providing a stronger level of governance and fostering collaboration. Building machine learning model is often a team sport, and the ability to share and reuse models easily can dramatically reduce the cost and effort involved in building and maintaining models.

SAS Visual Data Mining and Machine Learning enables users to build complex, enterprise-grade pipeline models that support sophisticated variable selection, feature engineering techniques, as well as model comparison processes all within a single, easy-to-understand, pipeline-based design framework.

Pipeline modeling using SAS VDMML

The graphical, pipeline-based modeling framework within SAS Visual Data Mining and Machine Learning leverages common components, supports self-documentation, and allows users to leverage a template-based approach to building and sharing machine learning models quickly.

More importantly, as a new user or team member who needs to review, tune or reuse someone else’s model, it is much easier and quicker to understand the design and intent of the various components of a pipeline model and make the needed changes.

It is much easier and quicker to understand the design and intent of the various components of a pipeline model.

Communication and storytelling

Finally, and perhaps most importantly, a graphical, low-code/no-code approach to building machine learning models makes it much easier to communicate both the intent and potential impact of the model. Figures and numbers represent facts, but narratives and stories convey emotion and build connections. The visual modeling approaches supported by SAS Viya enable you to tell compelling stories, share powerful ideas, and inspire valuable actions.

SAS Viya enables you to make changes and apply filters on the fly within its various visual modeling environments. With the model training process and model outputs all represented visually, it makes it extremely easy to discuss business scenarios, test hypotheses, and test modeling strategies and approaches, even with people without a deep machine learning background.

There is no question that a programmatic approach to building machine learning models offers the ultimate power and flexibility and enables data scientist to build the most complex and advanced machine learning models. But when it comes to speed, governance, and communications, a graphical, low-code/no-code approach to building machine learning definitely has a lot to offer.

To learn more about a low-code/no-code approach to building machine learning models using SAS Viya, check out my book Smart Data Discovery Using SAS® Viya®.

The value of a low-code/no-code approach to building machine learning models was published on SAS Users.

9月 222020
 

Everyone knows that SAS has been helping programmers and coders build complex machine learning models and solve complex business problems for many years, but did you know that you can also now build machines learning models without a single line of code using SAS Viya?

SAS has been helping programmers and coders build complex machine learning models and solve complex business problems over many years.

Building on the vision and commitment to democratize analytics, SAS Viya offers multiple ways to support non-programmers and empowers people with no programming skills to get up and running quickly and build machine learning models. I touched on some of the ways this can be done via SAS Visual Analytics in my previous post on analytics for everyone with SAS Viya. In addition, SAS Viya also supports more advanced pipeline-based visual modeling via SAS Visual Data Mining and Machine Learning. The combination of these different tools within SAS Viya supporting a low-code/no-code approach to modeling makes SAS Viya an incredibly flexible and powerful analytics platform that can help drive analytics usage and adoption throughout an organization.

As analytics and machine learning become more pervasive, an analytics platform that supports a low-code/no-code approach can get more people involved, drive ongoing innovations, and ultimately accelerate digital transformation throughout an organization.

Speed

I have met my fair share of coding ninjas who blew me away with their ability to build models using keyboards with lightning speed. But when it comes to being able to quickly get an idea into a model and generate all the assessment statistics and charts, there is nothing quite like a visual approach to building machine learning models.

In SAS Viya, you can build a decision tree model literally just by dragging and dropping the relevant variables onto the canvas as shown in the animated screen flow below.

Building a machine learning model via drag and drop

In this case, we were able to quickly build a decision tree model that predicts child mortality rates around the world. Not only do we get the decision tree in all its graphics glory (on the left-hand side of the image), we also get the overall model fit measure (Average Standard Error in this case), a variable importance chart, as well as a lift chart all without having to enter a single line of code in under 5 seconds!

You also get a bunch of detailed statistical outputs, including a detailed node statistics table without having to do anything extra. This is useful for when you need to review the distribution and characteristics of specific nodes when using the decision tree.

Detailed node statistics table

 

What’s more, you can leverage the same drag-and-drop paradigm to quickly tune the model. In our case, you can do simple modifications like adding a new variable by simply dragging a new data item onto the canvas or more complex techniques like manually splitting or pruning a node just by clicking and selecting a node on the canvas. The whole model and visualization refreshes instantly as you make changes, and you get instant feedback on the outputs of your tuning actions, which can help drive rapid iteration and idea testing.

Governance and collaboration

A graphical and components-based approach to modeling also has the added benefits of providing a stronger level of governance and fostering collaboration. Building machine learning model is often a team sport, and the ability to share and reuse models easily can dramatically reduce the cost and effort involved in building and maintaining models.

SAS Visual Data Mining and Machine Learning enables users to build complex, enterprise-grade pipeline models that support sophisticated variable selection, feature engineering techniques, as well as model comparison processes all within a single, easy-to-understand, pipeline-based design framework.

Pipeline modeling using SAS VDMML

The graphical, pipeline-based modeling framework within SAS Visual Data Mining and Machine Learning leverages common components, supports self-documentation, and allows users to leverage a template-based approach to building and sharing machine learning models quickly.

More importantly, as a new user or team member who needs to review, tune or reuse someone else’s model, it is much easier and quicker to understand the design and intent of the various components of a pipeline model and make the needed changes.

It is much easier and quicker to understand the design and intent of the various components of a pipeline model.

Communication and storytelling

Finally, and perhaps most importantly, a graphical, low-code/no-code approach to building machine learning models makes it much easier to communicate both the intent and potential impact of the model. Figures and numbers represent facts, but narratives and stories convey emotion and build connections. The visual modeling approaches supported by SAS Viya enable you to tell compelling stories, share powerful ideas, and inspire valuable actions.

SAS Viya enables you to make changes and apply filters on the fly within its various visual modeling environments. With the model training process and model outputs all represented visually, it makes it extremely easy to discuss business scenarios, test hypotheses, and test modeling strategies and approaches, even with people without a deep machine learning background.

There is no question that a programmatic approach to building machine learning models offers the ultimate power and flexibility and enables data scientist to build the most complex and advanced machine learning models. But when it comes to speed, governance, and communications, a graphical, low-code/no-code approach to building machine learning definitely has a lot to offer.

To learn more about a low-code/no-code approach to building machine learning models using SAS Viya, check out my book Smart Data Discovery Using SAS® Viya®.

The value of a low-code/no-code approach to building machine learning models was published on SAS Users.

8月 282020
 

Remember back to your early school days, singing with all your classmates “If you’re happy and you know it clap your hands!” and then we’d all clap our hands. Being happy back then was so simple. Today, it’s hard to get away from all the negative headlines of 2020! It’s [...]

Analyzing happiness data in 2020 was published on SAS Voices by Melanie Carey

8月 182020
 

As the operations director of any organization’s contact center, you’ll want to ensure that your employees have the right tools in their hands to deliver superior customer service ultimately leading to happy customers and improved revenue for your company. In a previous series on How SAS Visual Analytics’ automated analysis takes customer care to the next level, we saw how automated analysis used machine learning and natural language generation (NLG) to determine which factors were most important in predicting if telecommunications customers would be likely to upgrade to a different mobile plan. We then used this information to create a list of customers our customer care workers could contact to promote our new products. But what about making on-the-fly decisions about what offer(s) best supports a given customer’s needs? To provide support for this type of analysis, SAS recently introduced the automated prediction feature within SAS Visual Analytics on SAS Viya.

What is automated prediction?

Automated prediction, in less than a minute, runs several analytic models (such as decision trees, gradient boosting, and logistic and linear regression) on a specific variable of your choice. Most of the remaining variables in your dataset are automatically analyzed as factors that might influence your specified variable. They are called underlying factors. SAS then chooses the one model (champion model) that most accurately predicts your target variable. The model prediction and the underlying factors are then displayed. You can adjust the values of the underlying factors to determine how the model prediction changes with each adjustment.

Let’s look at how automated prediction works.

Here we have the same customer table we were working within our previous blog posts. This table contains 121 columns (i.e. variables) containing usage and demographic information from a subset of customers who have contacted our customer care centers. One of these columns is a flag that indicates whether that customer upgraded their plan or not. We’ll use this as our target variable.

We’ll right-click on the Upgrade Flag variable and choose Predict on a new page in our report (Figure 1 below).

Figure 1: Selecting automated prediction.

With the automated prediction feature, SAS Visual Analytics created this easy-to-use form in less than a few minutes—by using advanced analytic models and machine learning in the background—that can help predict whether a customer is likely to upgrade (Figure 2 below). SAS analyzed all the other variables in the dataset to determine which ones were most likely to influence our Upgrade Flag. We can modify some of the values in the form and see how it affects the outcome. The factors are listed in order of their relative importance.

Figure 2: Automated Prediction results.

Under the prediction, SAS provides further details using natural language generation (NLG) (Figure 3 below). For example, here we see that the most prevalent value in our data was Did not upgrade with 87.87% of the records having that value. We can also see what type of model was chosen as the champion model; the model that best predicts whether a customer will upgrade. In our current example, the Gradient Boosting model provides the most accurate results.

Figure 3: Natural Language Generation (NLG) provides details about the prediction.

Now, let’s say that a customer calls in. We can fill in the values for each of these parameters listed that are specific to that customer. The analysis is automatically updated using the model previously generated and provides an updated prediction.

Here we see that this customer is likely to upgrade (Figure 4 below). Now we can discuss other mobile plans with this customer.

Figure 4: Updated prediction based on values entered for a specific customer.

What if we want to learn more about the model behind the prediction and what variables were deemed the most important? We can find that information when we maximize the object (Figure 5 below).

Figure 5: Maximize to see model details.

Now we can see at the bottom the steps that were taken to create the champion model (step 2) (Figure 6 below). SAS ran a decision tree, logistic regression, and a gradient boosting model and found that the gradient boosting model provided the greatest accuracy (91.67% accurate in predicting upgrade flag).

Figure 6: Prediction model description.

If we select the Relative Importance tab, we can see the relative importance of each of the underlying factors (Figure 7 below).

Figure 7: Relative importance of underlying factors.

Total Days Over Plan has the greatest influence on our Upgrade Flag variable. Days Suspended Last 6M is the next most important variable whose impact is 43.97% of Total Days Over Plan (Figure 7 above).

Automated Prediction is a fast and easy way to gain an understanding of how variables influence a target and to consider “what if,” by seeing how modifying those underlying factors affects an outcome. Multiple models were run on the data and a champion model was chosen for us using machine learning. We were able to see the accuracy of the champion model and the relative importance of each influencer. All this within a few minutes! This provides a great foundation for moving forward to more advanced modeling techniques. For those who wish to have more control over the models, SAS Visual Analytics also provides capabilities to build and modify other advanced analytical models such as gradient boosting, linear and logistic regression, and decision trees. Furthermore, as your company’s analytic maturing increases additional products can be easily added on to provide even more model choices (Forest, Neural network, Support vector machine, etc.) and capabilities. SAS’ platform and products support the whole analytical life cycle from data preparation all the way through model deployment, model performance management, and decision intelligence.

Take the next step in learning more about SAS Visual Analytics on SAS Viya by signing up for a free trial!

How SAS Visual Analytics' automated prediction takes customer care to the next level was published on SAS Users.

8月 182020
 

As the operations director of any organization’s contact center, you’ll want to ensure that your employees have the right tools in their hands to deliver superior customer service ultimately leading to happy customers and improved revenue for your company. In a previous series on How SAS Visual Analytics’ automated analysis takes customer care to the next level, we saw how automated analysis used machine learning and natural language generation (NLG) to determine which factors were most important in predicting if telecommunications customers would be likely to upgrade to a different mobile plan. We then used this information to create a list of customers our customer care workers could contact to promote our new products. But what about making on-the-fly decisions about what offer(s) best supports a given customer’s needs? To provide support for this type of analysis, SAS recently introduced the automated prediction feature within SAS Visual Analytics on SAS Viya.

What is automated prediction?

Automated prediction, in less than a minute, runs several analytic models (such as decision trees, gradient boosting, and logistic and linear regression) on a specific variable of your choice. Most of the remaining variables in your dataset are automatically analyzed as factors that might influence your specified variable. They are called underlying factors. SAS then chooses the one model (champion model) that most accurately predicts your target variable. The model prediction and the underlying factors are then displayed. You can adjust the values of the underlying factors to determine how the model prediction changes with each adjustment.

Let’s look at how automated prediction works.

Here we have the same customer table we were working within our previous blog posts. This table contains 121 columns (i.e. variables) containing usage and demographic information from a subset of customers who have contacted our customer care centers. One of these columns is a flag that indicates whether that customer upgraded their plan or not. We’ll use this as our target variable.

We’ll right-click on the Upgrade Flag variable and choose Predict on a new page in our report (Figure 1 below).

Figure 1: Selecting automated prediction.

With the automated prediction feature, SAS Visual Analytics created this easy-to-use form in less than a few minutes—by using advanced analytic models and machine learning in the background—that can help predict whether a customer is likely to upgrade (Figure 2 below). SAS analyzed all the other variables in the dataset to determine which ones were most likely to influence our Upgrade Flag. We can modify some of the values in the form and see how it affects the outcome. The factors are listed in order of their relative importance.

Figure 2: Automated Prediction results.

Under the prediction, SAS provides further details using natural language generation (NLG) (Figure 3 below). For example, here we see that the most prevalent value in our data was Did not upgrade with 87.87% of the records having that value. We can also see what type of model was chosen as the champion model; the model that best predicts whether a customer will upgrade. In our current example, the Gradient Boosting model provides the most accurate results.

Figure 3: Natural Language Generation (NLG) provides details about the prediction.

Now, let’s say that a customer calls in. We can fill in the values for each of these parameters listed that are specific to that customer. The analysis is automatically updated using the model previously generated and provides an updated prediction.

Here we see that this customer is likely to upgrade (Figure 4 below). Now we can discuss other mobile plans with this customer.

Figure 4: Updated prediction based on values entered for a specific customer.

What if we want to learn more about the model behind the prediction and what variables were deemed the most important? We can find that information when we maximize the object (Figure 5 below).

Figure 5: Maximize to see model details.

Now we can see at the bottom the steps that were taken to create the champion model (step 2) (Figure 6 below). SAS ran a decision tree, logistic regression, and a gradient boosting model and found that the gradient boosting model provided the greatest accuracy (91.67% accurate in predicting upgrade flag).

Figure 6: Prediction model description.

If we select the Relative Importance tab, we can see the relative importance of each of the underlying factors (Figure 7 below).

Figure 7: Relative importance of underlying factors.

Total Days Over Plan has the greatest influence on our Upgrade Flag variable. Days Suspended Last 6M is the next most important variable whose impact is 43.97% of Total Days Over Plan (Figure 7 above).

Automated Prediction is a fast and easy way to gain an understanding of how variables influence a target and to consider “what if,” by seeing how modifying those underlying factors affects an outcome. Multiple models were run on the data and a champion model was chosen for us using machine learning. We were able to see the accuracy of the champion model and the relative importance of each influencer. All this within a few minutes! This provides a great foundation for moving forward to more advanced modeling techniques. For those who wish to have more control over the models, SAS Visual Analytics also provides capabilities to build and modify other advanced analytical models such as gradient boosting, linear and logistic regression, and decision trees. Furthermore, as your company’s analytic maturing increases additional products can be easily added on to provide even more model choices (Forest, Neural network, Support vector machine, etc.) and capabilities. SAS’ platform and products support the whole analytical life cycle from data preparation all the way through model deployment, model performance management, and decision intelligence.

Take the next step in learning more about SAS Visual Analytics on SAS Viya by signing up for a free trial!

How SAS Visual Analytics' automated prediction takes customer care to the next level was published on SAS Users.

8月 182020
 

As the operations director of any organization’s contact center, you’ll want to ensure that your employees have the right tools in their hands to deliver superior customer service ultimately leading to happy customers and improved revenue for your company. In a previous series on How SAS Visual Analytics’ automated analysis takes customer care to the next level, we saw how automated analysis used machine learning and natural language generation (NLG) to determine which factors were most important in predicting if telecommunications customers would be likely to upgrade to a different mobile plan. We then used this information to create a list of customers our customer care workers could contact to promote our new products. But what about making on-the-fly decisions about what offer(s) best supports a given customer’s needs? To provide support for this type of analysis, SAS recently introduced the automated prediction feature within SAS Visual Analytics on SAS Viya.

What is automated prediction?

Automated prediction, in less than a minute, runs several analytic models (such as decision trees, gradient boosting, and logistic and linear regression) on a specific variable of your choice. Most of the remaining variables in your dataset are automatically analyzed as factors that might influence your specified variable. They are called underlying factors. SAS then chooses the one model (champion model) that most accurately predicts your target variable. The model prediction and the underlying factors are then displayed. You can adjust the values of the underlying factors to determine how the model prediction changes with each adjustment.

Let’s look at how automated prediction works.

Here we have the same customer table we were working within our previous blog posts. This table contains 121 columns (i.e. variables) containing usage and demographic information from a subset of customers who have contacted our customer care centers. One of these columns is a flag that indicates whether that customer upgraded their plan or not. We’ll use this as our target variable.

We’ll right-click on the Upgrade Flag variable and choose Predict on a new page in our report (Figure 1 below).

Figure 1: Selecting automated prediction.

With the automated prediction feature, SAS Visual Analytics created this easy-to-use form in less than a few minutes—by using advanced analytic models and machine learning in the background—that can help predict whether a customer is likely to upgrade (Figure 2 below). SAS analyzed all the other variables in the dataset to determine which ones were most likely to influence our Upgrade Flag. We can modify some of the values in the form and see how it affects the outcome. The factors are listed in order of their relative importance.

Figure 2: Automated Prediction results.

Under the prediction, SAS provides further details using natural language generation (NLG) (Figure 3 below). For example, here we see that the most prevalent value in our data was Did not upgrade with 87.87% of the records having that value. We can also see what type of model was chosen as the champion model; the model that best predicts whether a customer will upgrade. In our current example, the Gradient Boosting model provides the most accurate results.

Figure 3: Natural Language Generation (NLG) provides details about the prediction.

Now, let’s say that a customer calls in. We can fill in the values for each of these parameters listed that are specific to that customer. The analysis is automatically updated using the model previously generated and provides an updated prediction.

Here we see that this customer is likely to upgrade (Figure 4 below). Now we can discuss other mobile plans with this customer.

Figure 4: Updated prediction based on values entered for a specific customer.

What if we want to learn more about the model behind the prediction and what variables were deemed the most important? We can find that information when we maximize the object (Figure 5 below).

Figure 5: Maximize to see model details.

Now we can see at the bottom the steps that were taken to create the champion model (step 2) (Figure 6 below). SAS ran a decision tree, logistic regression, and a gradient boosting model and found that the gradient boosting model provided the greatest accuracy (91.67% accurate in predicting upgrade flag).

Figure 6: Prediction model description.

If we select the Relative Importance tab, we can see the relative importance of each of the underlying factors (Figure 7 below).

Figure 7: Relative importance of underlying factors.

Total Days Over Plan has the greatest influence on our Upgrade Flag variable. Days Suspended Last 6M is the next most important variable whose impact is 43.97% of Total Days Over Plan (Figure 7 above).

Automated Prediction is a fast and easy way to gain an understanding of how variables influence a target and to consider “what if,” by seeing how modifying those underlying factors affects an outcome. Multiple models were run on the data and a champion model was chosen for us using machine learning. We were able to see the accuracy of the champion model and the relative importance of each influencer. All this within a few minutes! This provides a great foundation for moving forward to more advanced modeling techniques. For those who wish to have more control over the models, SAS Visual Analytics also provides capabilities to build and modify other advanced analytical models such as gradient boosting, linear and logistic regression, and decision trees. Furthermore, as your company’s analytic maturing increases additional products can be easily added on to provide even more model choices (Forest, Neural network, Support vector machine, etc.) and capabilities. SAS’ platform and products support the whole analytical life cycle from data preparation all the way through model deployment, model performance management, and decision intelligence.

Take the next step in learning more about SAS Visual Analytics on SAS Viya by signing up for a free trial!

How SAS Visual Analytics' automated prediction takes customer care to the next level was published on SAS Users.

7月 312020
 

In this SAS demo, I demonstrate how to prompt for a date range in a SAS Visual Analytics report. We walk through how to configure prompts using four types of control objects:

Slider (range)

Slider (single value)

Drop-down list

Text input

Then we cover how to define parameters and configure filters for report objects using the date prompted boundaries. These techniques are demonstrated using SAS Viya 3.4 SAS Visual Analytics 8.4 but can be applied to earlier releases.

I've also written accompanying articles in a four-part series. Below the video see the links to the articles and their corresponding timestamps in the video.

01:33 – 1st Example: Slider (Range) - How to prompt for a date range in a SAS VA report – Example 1 Slider (Range)

03:01 – 2nd Example: Slider (Single Value) - How to prompt for a date range in a SAS VA report – Example 2 Slider (Single Value)

14:04 – 3rd Example: Drop-down list - How to prompt for a date range in a SAS VA report – Example 3 Drop-down list

19:33 – 4th Example: Text input - How to prompt for a date range in a SAS VA report – Example 4 Text input

Other References

How to prompt for a date range in a SAS Visual Analytics Report - Four Part Series was published on SAS Users.

7月 142020
 

SAS, in partnership with Intel, is sponsoring the 2020 Esri User Conference taking place virtually on Jul. 13-16. The Esri User Conference is the world’s largest virtual Geographic Information System (GIS) event and will include three days of inspiring plenary and technical sessions of how GIS is making a difference [...]

Being an Esri User: Data visualization and location analytics was published on SAS Voices by Robby Powell