SAS Visual Analytics

5月 092017
 

What do you get when you combine analytics, aviation and the Internet of Things? A learning experience that leaves everyone flying high! At Data on the Fly, 25 area high school students had the opportunity to learn how technology has changed – and continues to change – the aviation industry. [...]

Students visualize aircraft data in real time using SAS was published on SAS Voices by Katie Howard

5月 052017
 

SAS Visual Analytics 7.4 comes with a chock-full of new features. Report and section linking come with an added benefit. If you set up linking from one section to another section in the same report, or from one report to another report, you have the option to configure linking such that any filter prompt in the linked target location is brushed or highlighted by the values that are selected in the linked report object. And the visual report objects in that target location are filtered to reflect the context that was passed from the source location.

In SAS Visual Analytics 7.3, when you took a report link from the subscribed report to a target report with a filter prompt (or a target section in the current report) with a filter prompt, the target filter prompt was filtered by the selection made in the source report or source section. Now, with SAS Visual Analytics 7.4, if a selection is made in the source report, and a report link (or a section link) is taken to the target report (or target section), the target filter prompt is brushed. Users benefit from the flexibility to choose filter options from that filter prompt in the target location and modify that filter prompt selection as needed. Note that in both the source and target locations, common data sources should be used. If the data item is different, you are asked to map it.

To illustrate this new linking feature in SAS Visual Analytics 7.4, I created a source report and a target report. The source report has a Button Bar that filters the report objects in the source report. The target report contains the target Button Bar that receives the filtering selection made in the source report and displays the applicable button.

To illustrate the new linking enhancement, let’s take a look at the default scenario and the configured scenario where the values in the target report filter prompt are brushed or highlighted. Here are the two reports – the source and the target reports.

Source Report with Linking

Target Report

Default behavior for report and section linking

In this example, let’s take a quick look at how linking worked in SAS Visual Analytics 7.3 (and it still works the same way in SAS Visual Analytics 7.4 by default). In the following source report, I have a Button Bar in the filter prompt.

Choosing Orion Germany in the Button Bar

When I choose Orion Germany in the Button Bar, the report objects are filtered to show the filtered results.

Report Objects Filtered by Orion Germany in the Source Report

When I take a link from the Orion Germany tile in the Treemap to the target report, the Button Bar in the target report is filtered to show Orion Germany (this is the default behavior for linking) in the target report.

Target Report With Orion Germany in the Button Bar

But what if I want my users to take a report link from the source report, and be able to choose from the filter choices in the Button Bar within this target report?

SAS Visual Analytics 7.4 to the rescue!

Here’s an example of what I did with the report linking in SAS Visual Analytics 7.4 by allowing the filtering choices to be retained in the target filter prompt.

I chose Orion France in the Button Bar within the Source Report:

Choosing Orion France in the Source Report

Then, I took a report link from the Orion France tile in the Tilemap to the target report:

Target Report with Orion France Highlighted in the Button Bar

Notice how the Button Bar in the target report is brushed by Orion France, and I still have a choice of selecting a different Orion country in the Button Bar.

Design the Link for the Prompt Filters in the Target Report

It’s simple to make this happen.

1.  In the source report, where I had previously created report linking, I selected the Treemap and I chose to edit the report link by going to Interactions tab.

2.  I clicked the icon for editing this report link.

3.  In the Edit Report Link dialog, I selected the checkbox for Set the value for controls in the target report prompt bar and clicked OK. And I saved my source report. That’s it!

Note: This option sets only values on the controls that use the same data item as the source object or on data items that filter the source object. The source and target of report link should be based on the same data source. If you have multiple data sources, you are prompted to map the report link.

Linking to target reports and sections in SAS Visual Analytics 7.4 was published on SAS Users.

4月 202017
 

Leaders in the education industry understand that when people at all levels have timely access to the right data and reports, they can generate trusted knowledge and insights that help transform programs, curriculums, student outcomes and more. That's how the industry's leaders deliver desired results faster to further student success. [...]

4 examples of how data, reporting and analytics are used in education was published on SAS Voices by Georgia Mariani

4月 112017
 

You may be wondering if you need something special to gain access to the Schedule Chart object. Don’t worry, you don’t, you just need to unhide this visualization if it isn’t already. You can do this from the Objects’ drop down menu. There are several other objects available to you if you’d like to show those as well. Simply check the ones you want to include in the list and then click ok.

The VA 7.3 Schedule Chart is similar to the traditional Gantt chart in that it serves to illustrate the start and finish duration of a category data item. You must provide a category data item and two date or datetime data items representing the start and end dates. You can also add a group by category, lattice by columns and/or rows.   Here is a simple example that visualizes my local school district’s 2016-2017 Traditional School Calendar.

Schedule charts can be used to visualize a variety of data such as:

  • Calendar Events
  • Project Tracking
  • Campaign/Promotional Runs
  • Floor Service Coverage

Essentially, any category which can be associated with a start and end date can use this visualization.

Here are some examples of using the Schedule Chart to look at project tracking data. Our team uses a similar visualization; however, I have modified real names and gave it a Star Wars theme for a bit of fun.

Example 1

In this example, the Project name is assigned as the main category. Here are a few takeaways:

  • The schedule chart gives a great bird’s eye view of a lot of data. This particular data has over 350 projects spanning a team of 19 individual members.
  • The schedule chart automatically includes the least and greatest date value. You can override the X Axis in the Properties tab by assigning a fixed minimum and maximum.

In this next screenshot, I have selected the manager Obi-Wan Kenobi to filter the Schedule Chart. Therefore, by adding section filters to this report, you can see how spotting coverage of Projects and Project Types are easy. And, with some Mock Combat planned later in the year, the Jedis might want to up their training.

Example 2

This example uses the same Schedule Chart role assignments as before, but different section prompt filters. Here, this report shows how an individual team member can use the Schedule Chart to visualize several things:

  • A list of his/her assigned projects.
  • The planned duration of each project.
  • How the projects are spread throughout the year.

If you chose to look at a particular Project Type, then this visualization would help list the Project names and how they span across the year.

Example 3

The next example moves away from the traditional use of putting the Project as the main category data item and instead places the Team Lead on the Y Axis. This now allows us to see how busy each Team member is and with which Project Type. By the way, did you notice the neat way the Team names are sorted? I used a custom sort!

Here are just a few more things you can do to enhance this visualization: you can adjust the transparency so you can see overlapping projects and you can easily add reference lines to the X Axis. In this example, I’ve added the reference lines for Q1 through Q4. I’ve also selected a manager from the report section filters and added an additional data item for the Label.

Example 4

In this example, I wanted to demonstrate the use of the Lattice rows and I also applied a Display Rule for the Project Type. This is a good way if you want to view overlapping information and the transparency property isn’t distinct enough.

 

Schedule Chart Limitations

If you want a bar representation on the Schedule Chart to appear then the data must have a start and end date for every row of data. If either is missing, then the category name will appear on the Y Axis but no bar will be displayed on the visualization.   Also, you cannot create an interaction from or to the Schedule Chart object. That means you cannot create a filter or brush with another object in the report area. The Schedule Chart will be filtered by either report or section prompts.   I hope you can include the Schedule Chart into your reports, it is one of my favorite visuals.

SAS Visual Analytics Designer 7.3 Schedule Chart was published on SAS Users.

4月 102017
 

You can expand on the functionality of SAS Visual Data Builder in SAS Visual Analytics by editing the query code, adding code for pre- and post-processing, or even writing your own query.   You can process single tables or join multiple tables, writing the output to a LASR  library, a SAS library, or a DBMS library.  But you can also easily schedule your queries, right from the Visual Data Builder interface.

Here’s how.

When a query is open in the workspace of Visual Data Builder, you can schedule the query from the application by clicking the Schedule (clock) icon.

The scheduling server used is determined by the SAS Visual Data Builder Scheduling preferences setting, shown below.

By default, the Visual Analytics deployment includes the Operating System Services scheduling server, so it appears automatically as the default.

The Server Manager plug-in to SAS Management Console identifies the scheduling servers that are included in your deployment. You can specify a different scheduling server, such as Platform Suite for SAS server, if your deployment includes it.

Note:  The Distributed In-process scheduling server is not supported.

Any scheduling preferences that you change are used the next time you create and schedule a query. If you need to change the settings for a query that is already scheduled, you can use SAS Management Console Schedule Manager to redeploy the deployed job for the query.

When you schedule a query, the SAS statements are saved in a file in the default deployment directory path: SAS-config-dir/Lev1/SASApp/SASEnvironment/SASCode/Jobs.

In the examples in this blog, the SAS-config-dir is /opt/sasinside/vaconfig.
The metadata name of the directory is Batch Jobs.
The default SAS Application Server name associated with the directory is SASApp.

If you are working in a VA environment where multiple application servers are defined, you should be aware of the following SAS Notes at the links below, relating to the application’s choice of application servers for scheduling.

SAS Note 58186SAS® Visual Data Builder might use the wrong application server for scheduling
SAS Note 52977SAS® Visual Data Builder requires the default SAS® Application Server and the default scheduling servers to be located on the same physical machine

To schedule a query, open the query and select the Schedule (clock) icon. (The clock is grayed out if you have not saved the query.)

You can schedule the query to run immediately (Run now) or at a specified time event.  To define a time event, select the Select one or more triggers for this query button and click New Time Event.  Grouping events are not supported for the default server, but may be supported for other scheduling servers, such as Platform Suite.

You can schedule for One time only, or More than once, running Hourly, Daily, Weekly, Monthly, or Yearly.  The appearance of the interface and scheduling parameters change with your specification.

In this example, a One time only event is specified.

 

The time event specification gets recorded in the Trigger list on the Schedule page, and is selected in the Used column.

After you click OK in the Schedule window, you will get the confirmation below.

After the time event has passed, you can verify that the table has been loaded on the LASR Tables tab of the Visual Analytics Administrator.

When you schedule, the Visual Data Builder:

  • creates a job that executes the query.
  • creates a deployed job from the job.
  • places the job into a new deployed flow.
  • schedules the flow on a scheduling server.

The files are named according to vdb_query_id_timestamp.
In this example the files are named vdb_CustomerInfoData_1490112883364_timestamp.
When the query executes at the scheduled time, the SAS code that is written to the /opt/sasinside/vaconfig/Lev1/SASApp/SASEnvironment/SASCode/Jobs directory.  The query is run with the user ID that scheduled it.

If you right-click on Server Manager in SAS Management Console and view Deployment Directories, you will see that this is the Deployment directory (Batch Jobs) for SASApp.

In the /opt/sasinside/vaconfig/Lev1/SASApp/BatchServer/Logs directory, you can view the SAS Log.

The scheduling server script and log are in /opt/sasinside/vaconfig/Lev1/SchedulingServer/Ahmed/vdb_CustomerInfoData_14900112883364

Observe that the script was written to this location at the time the job was scheduled, rather than at execution time.

If you edit a data query that is already scheduled, you must click the schedule icon again so that the SAS statements for the data query are regenerated and saved.

If you edit the query again and specify additional time events, each event appears in the trigger list, and you can check which time event is to be used for scheduling.

If scheduling a query according to time events, you should also be aware of this Usage note:

Usage Note 55880: Scheduled SAS® Visual Data Builder queries are executed based on the time zone of the scheduling server 

And to add to the fun, also keep in mind that if your deployment includes SAS Data Integration Studio, you can also export a query as a Job and then perform the deployment steps using DI Studio.

Just right-click on the query in the SAS folder panel in Visual Data Builder and Select Export as a Job!

Easy Scheduling in Visual Data Builder - SAS Visual Analytics 7.3 was published on SAS Users.

4月 102017
 

Earth is an explosive world! Data from the Smithsonian Institution's Global Volcanism Program (GVP) documents Earth's volcanoes and their eruptive history over the past 10,000 years. The GVP database includes the names, locations, types, and features of more than 1,500 volcanoes. Let's look closer into volcanic eruptions across the globe [...]

How to design an infographic about volcanic eruptions using SAS Visual Analytics was published on SAS Voices by Falko Schulz

3月 272017
 

When senior leaders at the University of Louisville (UofL) approached Vice Provost Bob Goldstein in early April 2016 with a request for a fully functioning data visualization platform by start of the 2016 fall semester—just four months away—he did not panic. Instead, Goldstein, along with Becky Patterson, Executive Director of [...]

Data visualization helps University of Louisville achieve its 2020 strategic plan was published on SAS Voices by Georgia Mariani

3月 092017
 

Several months ago, I posted a blog about calculating moving averages for a measure in the Visual Analytics Designer. Soon after that, I was asked about calculating not only the average, but also the standard deviation over a period of months, when the data might consist of one or more repeated values of a measure for each month of a series of N months.  For the example of N=20 months, we might want to view the average and standard deviation over the last n months, where n is any number between 3 and 20.

The example report shown below allows the user to type in a number, n, between 3 and 20, to display a report consisting of the amount values for past n months, the amount values for Current Month Amt-Previous, the Avg over the last n months, the Standard Deviation over the last n months, and the absolute value of the (Current Month Amt – Previous Month Amt), divided by the Standard Deviation over the last n months. A Display rule is applied to the final Abs column, showing Green for a value less than 1 and red for a value greater than or equal to 1.

The data used in this example had multiple Amount values for each month, so we first used the Visual Data Builder to create a SUM aggregation for Amount for each unique Date value.  This step gives more flexibility in using the amount value for aggregations in the designer.

When the modified data source is initially added to the report, it contains only the Category data item Month, with a format of MMYYYY, and the measure Amount Sum for Month.

The data will be displayed in a list table. The first columns added to the table will be Month, displayed with a MMYYYY format, and Amount Sum for Month.

Specify the properties for the list table as below:

Since we want to display the last n months, we create a new calculated data item, Numeric Date, calculated as below, using the TREATAS operator on the Month data item:

Then we create the Current Month Amt-Previous aggregated measure using the RelativePeriod date operator:

Next, create the Avg over all displayed months aggregated measure as below:

Then, create the Std.Dev. over all displayed months aggregated measure as shown below:

Create the Abs (Current-Previous/StdDev) as shown below:

Create a numeric parameter, Number of Months, as shown, with minimum value of 3 (smallest value that a standard deviation will make sense) and maximum value of 20 (the number of months in our data). You can let the default (Current value) value be any value that you choose:

For the List Table, create a Rank, as shown below. Note that we are creating the rank on the Numeric Date (not the Month data item), and rather than a specific value for count, we are going to use the value of the parameter, Number of Months.

Create a text input object that enables the user to type in a ‘number of months’ between 3 and 20.

Associate the Parameter with the Text input object:

If you wish, you can add display rules to sound an alarm whenever there is an alarming month-to-month difference in comparison to the standard deviation for the months.

So the final result of all of the above is this report, which points out month-to-month differences, which might deserve further concern or investigation. Note that the Numeric Date value is included below just to enable you to see what those values look like—you likely would not want to include that calculated data item in your report.

Calculating standard deviation of a measure in Visual Analytics Designer was published on SAS Users.

2月 252017
 

As a practitioner of visual analytics, I read the featured blog of ‘Visualizations: Comparing Tableau, SPSS, R, Excel, Matlab, JS, Python, SAS’ last year with great interest. In the post, the blogger Tim Matteson asked the readers to guess which software was used to create his 18 graphs. My buddy, Emily Gao, suggested that I should see how SAS VA does recreating these visualizations. I agreed.

SAS Visual Analytics (VA) is better known for its interactive visual analysis, and it’s also able to create nice visualizations. Users can easily create professional charts and visualizations without SAS coding. So what I am trying to do in this post, is to load the corresponding data to SAS VA environment, and use VA Explorer and Designer to mimic Matteson’s visualizations.

I want to specially thank Robert Allison for his valuable advices during the process of writing this post. Robert Allison is a SAS graph expert, and I learned a lot from his posts. I read his blog on creating 18 amazing graphs using purely SAS code, and I copied most data from his blog when doing these visualization, which saved me a lot time preparing data.

So, here’s my attempt at recreating Matteson’s 18 visualization using SAS Visual Analytics.

Chart 1

This visualization is created by using two customized bar charts in VA, and putting them together using precision layout so it looks like one chart. The customization of bar charts can be done by using the ‘Custom Graph Builder’ in SAS VA, which includes: set the reverse order for X axis, set the axes direction to horizontal, and don’t show axis label for X axis and Y axis, uncheck the ‘show tick marks’, etc. Comparing with Matteson’s visualization, my version has the tick values on X axis displayed as non-negative numbers, as people generally would expect positive value for the frequency.

Another thing is, I used the custom sort for the category to define the order of the items in the bar chart. This can be done by right click on the category and select ‘Edit Custom Sort…’ to get the desired order. You may also have noticed that the legend is a bit strange for the Neutral response, since it is split into Neutral_1stHalf and Neutral_2ndHalf, which I need to gracefully show the data symmetrically in the visualization in VA.

Chart 2

VA can create a grouped bar chart with desired sort order for the countries and the questions easily. However, we can only put the questions texts horizontally atop of each group bar in VA. VA uses vertical section bar instead, with its tooltip to show the whole question text when the mouse is hovered onto it. And we can see the value of each section in bar interactively in VA when hovering the mouse over.

Chart 3

Matteson’s chart looks a bit scattered to me, while Robert’s chart is great at label text and markers for the scatterplot matrix. Here I use VA Explorer to create the scatterplot matrix for the data, which omitted the diagonal cells and its diagonal symmetrical part for easier data analysis purpose. It can then be exported to report, and change the color of data points.

Chart 4

I used the ‘Numeric Series Plot’ to draw this chart of job losses in recession. It was straightforward. I just adjust some setting like checking the ‘Show markers’ in the Properties tab, unchecking the ‘Show label’ in X Axis and unchecking the ‘Use filled markers’, etc. To make refinement of X axis label of different fonts, I need to use the ‘Precision’ layout instead of the default ‘Tile’ layout. Then drag the ‘Text’ object to contain the wanted X axis label.

Chart 5

VA can easily draw the grouped bar charts automatically. Disable the X axis label, and set the grey color for the ‘Header background.’ What we need to do here, is to add some display rules for the mapping of color-value. For the formatted text at the bottom, use the ‘Text’ object. (Note: VA puts the Age_range values at the bottom of the chart.)

Chart 6

SAS VA does not support drawn 3D charts, so I could not make similar chart as Robert did with SAS codes. What I do for this visualization, is to create a network diagram using the Karate club dataset. The grouped detected communities (0, 1, 2, 3) are showing with different colors. The diagram can be exported as image in VAE.

***I use the following codes to generate the necessary data for the visualization:

http://support.sas.com/documentation/cdl/en/procgralg/68145/HTML/default/viewer.htm#procgralg_optgraph_examples07.htm 

/* Dataset of Zachary’s Karate Club data is from: http://support.sas.com/documentation/cdl/en/procgralg/68145/HTML/default/viewer.htm#procgralg_optgraph_examples07.htm  
This dataset describes social network friendships in karate club at a U.S. university.
*/
data LinkSetIn;
   input from to weight @@;
   datalines;
 0  9  1  0 10  1  0 14  1  0 15  1  0 16  1  0 19  1  0 20  1  0 21  1
 0 23  1  0 24  1  0 27  1  0 28  1  0 29  1  0 30  1  0 31  1  0 32  1
 0 33  1  2  1  1  3  1  1  3  2  1  4  1  1  4  2  1  4  3  1  5  1  1
 6  1  1  7  1  1  7  5  1  7  6  1  8  1  1  8  2  1  8  3  1  8  4  1
 9  1  1  9  3  1 10  3  1 11  1  1 11  5  1 11  6  1 12  1  1 13  1  1
13  4  1 14  1  1 14  2  1 14  3  1 14  4  1 17  6  1 17  7  1 18  1  1
18  2  1 20  1  1 20  2  1 22  1  1 22  2  1 26 24  1 26 25  1 28  3  1
28 24  1 28 25  1 29  3  1 30 24  1 30 27  1 31  2  1 31  9  1 32  1  1
32 25  1 32 26  1 32 29  1 33  3  1 33  9  1 33 15  1 33 16  1 33 19  1
33 21  1 33 23  1 33 24  1 33 30  1 33 31  1 33 32  1
;
run;
/* Perform the community detection using resolution levels (1, 0.5) on the Karate Club data. */
proc optgraph
   data_links            = LinkSetIn
   out_nodes             = NodeSetOut
   graph_internal_format = thin;
   community
      resolution_list    = 1.0 0.5
      out_level          = CommLevelOut
      out_community      = CommOut
      out_overlap        = CommOverlapOut
      out_comm_links     = CommLinksOut;
run;
 
/* Create the dataset of detected community (0, 1, 2, 3) for resolution level equals 1.0 */ 
proc sql;
	create table mylib.newlink as 
	select a.from, a.to, b.community_1, c.nodes from LinkSetIn a, NodeSetOut b, CommOut c
 	where a.from=b.node and b.community_1=c.community and c.resolution=1 ;
quit;

Chart 7

I created this map using the ‘Geo Coordinate Map’ in VA. I need to create a geography variable by right clicking on the ‘World-cities’ and selecting Geography->Custom…->, and set the Latitude to the ‘Unprojected degrees latitude,’ and Longitude to the ‘Unprojected degrees longitude.’ To get the black continents in the map, go to VA preferences, check the ‘Invert application colors’ under the Theme. Remember to set the ‘Marker size’ to 1, and change the first color of markers to black so that it will show in white when application color is inverted.

Chart 8

This is a very simple scatter chart in VA. I only set transparency in order to show the overlapping value. The blue text in left-upper corner is using a text object.

Chart 9

To get this black background graph, set the ‘Wall background’ color to black. Then change the ‘Line/Marker’ color in data colors section accordingly. I’ve also checked the ‘Show markers’ option and changed the marker size to bigger 6.

Chart 10

There is nothing special for creating this scatter plot in VA. I simply create several reference lines, and uncheck the ‘Use filled markers’ with smaller marker size. The transparency of the markers is set to 30%.

Chart 11

In VA’s current release, if we use a category variable for color, the marker will automatically change to different markers for different colors. So I create a customized scatterplot using VA Custom Graph Builder, to define the marker as always round. Nothing else, just set the transparency to clearly show the overlapping values. As always, we can add an image object in VA with precision layout.

Chart 12

I used the GEO Bubble Map to create this visualization. I needed to create a custom Geography variable from the trap variable using ‘lat_deg’ and ‘lon_deg’ as latitude and longitude respectively. Then rename the NumMosquitos measure to ‘Total Mosquitos’ and use it for bubble size. To show the presence of west nile virus, I use the display rule in VA. I also create an image to show the meaning of the colored icons for display rule. The precision layout is enabled in order to have text and images added for this visualization.

Chart 13

This visualization is also created with GEO bubble map in VA. First I did some data manipulation to make the magnitude squared just for the sake of the bubble size resolution, so it shows contrast in size. Then I create some display rules to show the significance of the earth quakes with different colors, and set the transparency of the bubble to 30% for clarity. I also created an image to show the meaning of the colored icons.

Be aware that some data manipulation is needed for original longitude data. Since the geographic coordinates will use the meridian as reference, if we want to show the data of American in the right part, we need to add 360 to the longitude, whose value is negative.

Chart 14

My understanding that one of the key points of this visualization Matteson made, is to show the control/interaction feature. Great thing is, VA has various control objects for interactive analysis. For the upper part in this visualization, I simply put a list table object. The trick here is how to use display rule to mimic the style. Before assigning any data to the list table in VA, I create a display rule with Expression, and at this moment we can specify the column with any measure value in an expression. (Otherwise, you need to define the display rule for each column with some expressions.) Just define ‘Any measure value’ is missing or greater than a value with proper filled color for cell. (VA doesn’t support filling the cell with certain pattern like Robert did for missing value. Therefore, I use grey for missing value to differentiate from 0 with a light color.)

For the lower part, I create a new dataset for interventions to hold the intervention items, and put it in the list control and a list table. The right horizontal bar chart is a target bar chart with the expected duration as the targeted value. The label on each bar shows the actual duration.

Chart 15

VA does not have solid-modeling animation like Matteson made in his original chart, yet VA has animation support for bubble plots in an interactive mode. So I made this visualization using Robert’s animation dataset, trying to make an imitation of the famous animation by the late Hans Rosling as a memorial. I set the dates for animation by creating the dates variable with the first day in each year (just for simplicity). One customization here is: I use the custom graph builder to add a new role so that it can display the data label in the bubble plot, and set the country name as the bubble label in VA Designer. Certainly, we can always filter the interested countries in VA for further analysis.

VA can’t show only a part of the bubble labels as Robert did using SAS codes. So in order to clearly show the labels of those interested countries, I made a rank of top 20 countries of average populations, and set a filter to show data between year 1950 to 2011. I use a capture screen tool to have the animation saved as a .gif file. Be sure to click the chart to see the animation.

Chart 16

I think Matteson’s original chart is to show the overview axis in the line chart, since I don’t see specialty of the line chart otherwise. So I draw this time series plot with the overview axis enabled in VA using the SASHELP.STOCK dataset. It shows the date on X axis with tick marks splitting to months, which can be zoomed in to day level in VA interactively. The overview axis can do the zooming in and out, as well as movement of the focused period.

Chart 17

For this visualization, I use a customized bubble plot (in Custom Graph Builder, add a Data Label Role for Bubble Plot.) so it will have bubble labels displayed. I use one reference line with label of Gross Avg., and 2 reference lines for X and Y axis accordingly, thus it visually creats four quadrants. As usual, add 4 text objects to hold the labels at each corner in the precision layout.

Chart 18

I think Matteson made an impressive 3D chart, and Robert recreated a very beautiful 3D chart with pure SAS codes. But VA does not have any 3D charts. So for this visualization, I simply load the data in VA, and drag them to have a visualization in VAE. Then choose the best fit from the fit line list, and export the visualization to report. Then, add display rules according to the value of Yield. Since VA shows the display rules at information panel, I create an image for colored markers to show them as legend in the visualization and put it in the precision layout.

There you have it. Matteson’s 18 visualizations recreated in VA.

How did I do?

18 Visualizations created by SAS Visual Analytics was published on SAS Users.

2月 142017
 

In this post I wanted to shed some light on a visualization you may not be using enough: the Word Cloud. Word association exercises can often be a fun way to pass the time with friends, or it can trigger immediate action – just think of your email inbox and seeing an email from a particular person: your boss, wife, husband or child. The same can be true for information for your organization. A single word can quickly, efficiently and effectively communicate the performance of a company’s metric, hence the value of using a word cloud visualization in your report.

Let’s look at some examples. Here I am using the Insight Toy data and looking at the performance of Products based on customer orders.

As the word cloud in SAS Visual Analytics 7.3 Designer has a maximum row return of 100, I have used the Rank feature to look at the top 25 Products and the bottom 25 Products. I also created a filtered interaction between the word clouds and their respective list tables below to show a bit more detail around the next level in the hierarchy after Product Make.

Notice how impactful these Product names are compared to when using their corresponding SKUs. Be sure to pick a meaningful category to represent your data in the word cloud.

This type of visualization could lead to a great comparison report, comparing what the top and bottom Products were for the same month in the previous year.

What if your data doesn’t have the appropriate column to display on a word cloud? No problem. In this next example, I took the value of Sales Rep Rating and created a new Calculated Data Item to represent values less than or equal to 25% to be Poor, inclusively between 26% and 50% to be Average and everything else to be Above Average.

Using a word cloud for this new category data item allows you to quickly move through the different states and compare the Sales Rep Performance frequency. You could also use this new category to compare each performance group’s Order Totals.

Here is California’s Sales Rep Performance:

And here is Maryland’s Sales Rep Performance:


These are two ideas for you to think about how you might include the word cloud visualization into your reports to help quickly and effectively represent the status of a company’s metric beyond the standard text analytics usage.

tags: SAS Professional Services, SAS Visual Analytics

Visualization Spotlight: Visual Analytics Designer 7.3 Word Cloud was published on SAS Users.