SAS Viya

7月 102017
 

In SAS Viya 3.2, SAS Visual Data Builder provides a mechanism for performing simple, self-service data preparation tasks for SAS Visual Analytics or other applications. SAS Visual Data Builder is NOT an Extract, Transform and Load (ETL) or data quality tool. You may still need one of those tools to perform more complex data preparation.

SAS Visual Data Builder can perform the following tasks:

  • View table and column profiles – provides information on number rows and columns on the table, as well as standard and advanced metrics for the columns.
  • Perform data transformations – includes items such as joining tables, transposing columns, creating calculated columns, filtering data and splitting columns.
  • Create plans – a plan is a collection of data transformations (actions) performed on one or more tables.  Plans can be saved and executed again.

SAS Visual Data Builder

To access SAS Visual Data Builder from SAS Home, select ≡ > SAS Visual Data Builder from the menu.
Note: The user must belong to the pre-defined custom user group Data Builders to have permission to access the application.

For SAS Visual Data Builder, the user can select their preferred default start screen in their application Settings.

The options are:

  • Show welcome dialog.
  • Start with data.
  • Start with new plan.
  • Choose existing plan.

With the SAS Viya 3.2 release, SAS Visual Data Builder is now a separate application from Visual Analytics (VA). There is not a one-to-one mapping of the feature set in SAS 9.4: VA 7.3 Data Preparation to SAS Viya 3.2: SAS Visual Data Builder.

For more information on SAS Visual Data Builder refer to the SAS Viya 3.2: Visual Data Builder was published on SAS Users.

6月 302017
 

In this blog post I’d like to explore how to create a custom group in SAS Viya to restrict access to functionality. To illustrate my points, we will create a report developers custom group and ensure that only users of that group can create reports and analysis in SAS Visual Analytics.

What a user or group can do (and see) is controlled by rules. A rule is a composite of authorization elements including:

  • Principal: user or group.
  • Target: a resource for example a service, folder or report.
  • Permissions: type of access for example read or write.
  • Setting: indication of whether access is provided, for example grant or prohibit.

The target of a rule is identified using a uniform resource identifier (uri). The uri can represent a folder, content such as a report or data plan, or functionality and features such as being able to import data. Here are some examples of uri’s in SAS Viya:

  • Data Plan: /dataPreparationPlans/plans/810e2c6b-4733-4d53-94fd-dfeb4df0de9e
  • Folder: /folders/folders/e28e35af-2673-4fc7-81fa-1a074f4c0de9
  • Functionality: /SASVisualAnalytics/**

In our example, we will look at restricting access SAS Visual Analytics for a subset of users. In SAS 9.4 this would have been accomplished using roles and capabilities. In SAS Viya, we will:

  • Create a custom group.
  • Govern that groups access to functionality using rules.

Create a New Custom Group

In SAS Environment Manager, as an administrator (only administrators can manage users and groups) select Users > Custom Groups > New.

In the new custom group screen give the group a name, a unique id and a description. We will call our group Report Developers.

After the new group is created, click the edit button to add new members to the group. You can add users or other groups as members of the new group.

Change the Rules so that Only Report Developers can Access the SAS Visual Analytics Application

Now that we have a new group called Report Developers, the next step is to create or update the rule that determines who can access this functionality. First, we will look at what rules currently apply to SAS Visual Analytics.

In SAS Environment Manager select the Security menu item and select the Rules view.

Select Filter by: ObjectURI and enter SASVisualA in the search box.

The second rule listed is the one we are interested in. Notice that URI ends with /**.  URI’s can end with /* or  / **.  An objectUri that includes the /** suffix affects access to all descendant functionality. For example, the /SASVisualAnalytics/** means all functionality in the SAS Visual Analytics application.

Select /SASVisualAnalytics/** and click the Edit icon.  The attributes show that this rule determines who can use SAS Visual Analytics. Currently you’ll see:

  • Grants Read access
    • to /SASVisualAnalytics/** and all its descendent functionality
      • to all authenticated users.

The rule works because the general authorization system implicitly disallows any access that is not granted. The current rule overrides the implicit deny to allow authenticated users to access SAS Visual Analytics. We will edit the rule and change the principal from Authenticated Users to ReportDevelopers.

In the edit rule screen under Principal, select ReportDevelopers.

The impact of the change is that now only users who are members of the Report Developers group can access the Visual Analytics application to create reports.

To test this, you can logon as a user who is not a member of the group. Those users will be able to navigate to reports and open then using the report viewer, but they will not be able to access SAS Visual Analytics to create new reports.

That is a quick look at using custom groups and rules to dictate what users can do in SAS Viya. There is much more detail on these topics in the SAS® Viya 3.2 Administration Guide:

New rules for authorization in SAS Viya was published on SAS Users.

6月 292017
 

One of the big benefits of the SAS Viya platform is how approachable it is for programmers of other languages. You don't have to learn SAS in order to become productive quickly. We've seen a lot of interest from people who code in Python, maybe because that language has become known for its application in machine learning. SAS has a new product called SAS Visual Data Mining and Machine Learning. And these days, you can't offer such a product without also offering something special to those Python enthusiasts.

Introducing Python SWAT

And so, SAS has published the Python SWAT project (where "SWAT" stands for the SAS scripting wapper for analytical transfer. The project is a Python code library that SAS released using an open source model. That means that you can download it for free, make changes locally, and even contribute those changes back to the community (as some developers have already done!). You'll find it at github.com/sassoftware/python-swat.

SAS developer Kevin Smith is the main contributor on Python SWAT, and he's a big fan of Python. He's also an expert in SAS and in many programming languages. If you're a SAS user, you probably run Kevin's code every day; he was an original developer on the SAS Output Delivery System (ODS). Now he's a member of the cloud analytics team in SAS R&D. (He's also the author of more than a few conference papers and SAS books.)

Kevin enjoys the dynamic, fluid style that a scripting language like Python affords - versus the more formal "code-compile-build-execute" model of a compiled language. Watch this video (about 14 minutes) in which Kevin talks about what he likes in Python, and shows off how Python SWAT can drive SAS' machine learning capabilities.

New -- but familiar -- syntax for Python coders

The analytics engine behind the SAS Viya platform is called CAS, or SAS Cloud Analytic Services. You'll want to learn that term, because "CAS" is used throughout the SAS documentation and APIs. And while CAS might be new to you, the Python approach to CAS should feel very familiar for users of Python libraries, especially users of pandas, the Python Data Analysis Library.

CAS and SAS' Python SWAT extends these concepts to provide intuitive, high-performance analytics from SAS Viya in your favorite Python environment, whether that's a Jupyter notebook or a simple console. Watch the video to see Kevin's demo and discussion about how to get started. You'll learn:

  • How to connect your Python session to the CAS server
  • How to upload data from your client to the CAS server
  • How SWAT extends the concept of the DataFrame API in pandas to leverage CAS capabilities
  • How to coax CAS to provide descriptive statistics about your data, and then go beyond what's built into the traditional DataFrame methods.

Learn more about SAS Viya and Python

There are plenty of helpful resources to help you learn about using Python with SAS Viya:

And finally, what if you don't have SAS Viya yet, but you're interested in using Python with SAS 9.4? Check out the SASPy project, which allows you to access your traditional SAS features from a Jupyter notebook or Python console. It's another popular open source project from SAS R&D.

The post Using Python to work with SAS Viya and CAS appeared first on The SAS Dummy.

6月 142017
 

In SAS Viya 3.2, the Self-Service Import provides a mechanism for a user to import (copy) data into the SAS Cloud Analytic Services (CAS) environment. The data is copied as a .sashdat file into the selected CAS Library location when it is imported.  Self-Service Import data can only be imported into CAS libraries of type PATH, HDFS, or DNFS.

The Self-Service Import functionality is available in the following applications:

  • SAS Visual Data Builder
  • SAS Visual Analytics
  • SAS Environment Manager – Data

To have access to Self-Service Import, the end user must be granted the Read permission on the /casManagement_capabilities/importData object URI in the Security ⇨ Rules area of SAS Environment Manager.

Self-Service Import supports importing data to CAS from Local, Server, and Social Media sources.

Self-Service Import in SAS Viya

SAS Viya 3.2: Self-Service Import

Local

Local file data can be imported from Microsoft Excel (.XLSX or .XLS), text file (.TXT or .CSV), the clipboard, or a SAS Data Set (SASHDAT or SAS7BDAT). The file(s) must exist on a file system available to your PC.

Server

After providing the appropriate server connection information, a table from LASR or select database types can be imported. The currently supported database types are:  Oracle, Teradata, Hadoop, PostgreSQL, and Impala. The Server selections displayed are dependent on your licensing and configuration.

Social Media

After authentication with the social media provider (Twitter, Facebook, Google Analytics, or YouTube), data can be imported through the social media provider’s public API. Access to these APIs is subject to the social media provider’s applicable license terms, terms of use, and other usage terms and policies.

Currently, there is a size limit for file imports that is set on the CAS Management service Configuration screen in SAS Environment Manager. The default size is 4GB. The local file importer has a 4GB limit because that is what the smallest size limit browser (Internet Explorer) is restricted to; however, Chrome and other browsers will allow larger file sizes, which is why there is a property that allows an Admin to set a higher limit. A modification to the max-file-size property requires a restart of the casManagement service.

Social Media and DBMS importers have no explicit limits. However, there is a limitation of the disk size of where casManagement is running because the uploaded file gets written to a temporary file on the server relative to casManagement.

For more information refer to the Self-Service Import section of the The Self-Service Import in SAS Viya 3.2 was published on SAS Users.

6月 072017
 

Innovation used to happen in structured cycles. The new invention was often a planned event and the domain of a select few departments within an organisation. But in today's always-on economy enterprises need to innovate on a continuous basis to keep up with new players that base their entire businesses [...]

Don’t trip up on the edge of innovation was published on SAS Voices by Peter Pugh-Jones

5月 232017
 

I do not like to stand still. I am a lifelong learner, I take guitar lessons during the week, and I am known for riding my Segway around SAS campus and at events. SAS works the same way; we never stand still. We are continuously innovating and moving forward. Last [...]

Developing with passion: 4 new technologies shaping the future of SAS was published on SAS Voices by Oliver Schabenberger

5月 232017
 

I do not like to stand still. I am a lifelong learner, I take guitar lessons during the week, and I am known for riding my Segway around SAS campus and at events. SAS works the same way; we never stand still. We are continuously innovating and moving forward. Last [...]

Developing with passion: 4 new technologies shaping the future of SAS was published on SAS Voices by Oliver Schabenberger

5月 232017
 

I do not like to stand still. I am a lifelong learner, I take guitar lessons during the week, and I am known for riding my Segway around SAS campus and at events. SAS works the same way; we never stand still. We are continuously innovating and moving forward. Last [...]

Developing with passion: 4 new technologies shaping the future of SAS was published on SAS Voices by Oliver Schabenberger

5月 092017
 

Microservices are a key component of the SAS Viya architecture. In this post, I’ll introduce and explain the benefits of microservices. In a future post we’ll dig deeper into the microservices architecture.

What are microservices?

When we look at SAS Viya architecture diagrams, we can find, among the new core components, microservices.

Microservices are self-contained, lightweight pieces of software that

  • Do one thing.
  • Depend on one another to the least extent possible.
  • Are deployed independently.
  • Provide a language-agnostic API.
  • Can run one or more instances of these processes at any given time.

Note that the prefix “micro” doesn’t mean small in CPU or memory consumption. Rather, it refers to the software performing a single function or being narrow in scope.

Let’s compare to SAS 9

The SAS 9 Web Infrastructure Platform services and the overall platform are tightly coupled to metadata structures and schemas. Every maintenance action takes a bit of effort: can you apply a fix to a single application without first stopping the whole infrastructure? Can you upgrade one component and leave all of the other ones at the previous release? Can you…?

To address these and other issues, SAS R&D decomposed the metadata server,  the Web Infrastructure Platform, and  many web applications. As a result, we got many functional units. Each one is a microservice.

Let’s have a look at the following examples.

In SAS 9.4 we can open the SAS Management Console to manage users and groups:

In SAS Viya, we can do the same using the SAS Environment Manager web application:

You may think we simply switched to a different, web-based client. Actually, the real difference lies in the backend implementation. With SAS 9, the metadata server was responsible for servicing that functionality in addition to a host of other features. With SAS Viya, we have a dedicated microservice for it: the Identities microservice.

Here’s another example. We want to edit an option in the configuration of an application, like the address of the Open Street Map server to use with Visual Analytics geo maps. With SAS 9, we use the SAS Management Console to interact, as usual, with the metadata server.

With SAS Viya, we set the property with Environment Manager. And, guess what? We are using the Configuration microservice.

If you are curious and want to see a list of all the microservices deployed in your SAS Viya environment, you can, again, use the Environment Manager.

Note that in all these examples, the Environment Manager is simply serving as the GUI to a particular microservice supporting the associated feature.

What are the benefits of Microservices?

The move to a microservice-oriented architecture brings many benefits to all stakeholders, first and foremost to SAS users and SAS administrators.

Microservices are independently updatable

It is now easier for you to manage and maintain your environment. Hot fixes for a specific microservice are released just as normal updates, and the official installation process is documented in the

Just as with the previous point, there are a few exceptions: almost everything requires the SASLogon and Identities microservices, so, if they are down, nothing works.

Scalability and High Availability

When microservices are spun up, they self-register, making themselves available for processing requests. This way, supporting failover is as easy as ensuring you have at least two instances of the associated microservice up and running. It is possible to scale further for increased capacity/performance, and you can do so at the microservice level, based on the specific demand for each function (e.g., you likely won’t need as many instances of the Import VA SPK microservice as you do for the Authorization microservice).

Microservices are “open”

Microservices can run in different environments – bare OS, Cloud Foundry, Docker. Also, they are accessible to non-SAS developers through REST APIs. As an example, let’s say I’d like to retrieve the same properties for the SAS Administrators group that were shown above in Environment Manager. It’s as easy as calling a REST endpoint: http://<myserver>/identities/groups/SASAdministrators
The result can be in either XML or json.

In fact, even microservices communicate with one another using REST interfaces!

I hope this blog has been helpful.

Feel free to add comments or questions below.

Let’s talk about Microservices was published on SAS Users.

5月 092017
 

Microservices are a key component of the SAS Viya architecture. In this post, I’ll introduce and explain the benefits of microservices. In a future post we’ll dig deeper into the microservices architecture.

What are microservices?

When we look at SAS Viya architecture diagrams, we can find, among the new core components, microservices.

Microservices are self-contained, lightweight pieces of software that

  • Do one thing.
  • Depend on one another to the least extent possible.
  • Are deployed independently.
  • Provide a language-agnostic API.
  • Can run one or more instances of these processes at any given time.

Note that the prefix “micro” doesn’t mean small in CPU or memory consumption. Rather, it refers to the software performing a single function or being narrow in scope.

Let’s compare to SAS 9

The SAS 9 Web Infrastructure Platform services and the overall platform are tightly coupled to metadata structures and schemas. Every maintenance action takes a bit of effort: can you apply a fix to a single application without first stopping the whole infrastructure? Can you upgrade one component and leave all of the other ones at the previous release? Can you…?

To address these and other issues, SAS R&D decomposed the metadata server,  the Web Infrastructure Platform, and  many web applications. As a result, we got many functional units. Each one is a microservice.

Let’s have a look at the following examples.

In SAS 9.4 we can open the SAS Management Console to manage users and groups:

In SAS Viya, we can do the same using the SAS Environment Manager web application:

You may think we simply switched to a different, web-based client. Actually, the real difference lies in the backend implementation. With SAS 9, the metadata server was responsible for servicing that functionality in addition to a host of other features. With SAS Viya, we have a dedicated microservice for it: the Identities microservice.

Here’s another example. We want to edit an option in the configuration of an application, like the address of the Open Street Map server to use with Visual Analytics geo maps. With SAS 9, we use the SAS Management Console to interact, as usual, with the metadata server.

With SAS Viya, we set the property with Environment Manager. And, guess what? We are using the Configuration microservice.

If you are curious and want to see a list of all the microservices deployed in your SAS Viya environment, you can, again, use the Environment Manager.

Note that in all these examples, the Environment Manager is simply serving as the GUI to a particular microservice supporting the associated feature.

What are the benefits of Microservices?

The move to a microservice-oriented architecture brings many benefits to all stakeholders, first and foremost to SAS users and SAS administrators.

Microservices are independently updatable

It is now easier for you to manage and maintain your environment. Hot fixes for a specific microservice are released just as normal updates, and the official installation process is documented in the

Just as with the previous point, there are a few exceptions: almost everything requires the SASLogon and Identities microservices, so, if they are down, nothing works.

Scalability and High Availability

When microservices are spun up, they self-register, making themselves available for processing requests. This way, supporting failover is as easy as ensuring you have at least two instances of the associated microservice up and running. It is possible to scale further for increased capacity/performance, and you can do so at the microservice level, based on the specific demand for each function (e.g., you likely won’t need as many instances of the Import VA SPK microservice as you do for the Authorization microservice).

Microservices are “open”

Microservices can run in different environments – bare OS, Cloud Foundry, Docker. Also, they are accessible to non-SAS developers through REST APIs. As an example, let’s say I’d like to retrieve the same properties for the SAS Administrators group that were shown above in Environment Manager. It’s as easy as calling a REST endpoint: http://<myserver>/identities/groups/SASAdministrators
The result can be in either XML or json.

In fact, even microservices communicate with one another using REST interfaces!

I hope this blog has been helpful.

Feel free to add comments or questions below.

Let’s talk about Microservices was published on SAS Users.