social media analytics

3月 122019
 

The Special Olympics is part of the inclusion movement for people with intellectual disabilities. The organisation provides year-round sports training and competitions for adults and children with intellectual disabilities. In March 2019 the Special Olympics World Games will be held in Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates. There are a number [...]

Normal and exceptional: analytics in use at the Special Olympics was published on SAS Voices by Yigit Karabag

4月 292015
 

We’ve all heard the old saw, “If you torture data long enough, eventually it will confess to something.” But when it comes to spurring real change, how about ditching the dungeon-master act and thinking like a venture capitalist instead? Wouldn’t that pay bigger dividends? That was the tip from Ravi […]

The post Data scientist as venture capitalist appeared first on SAS Voices.

12月 232014
 

When we talk about digital customer services, it’s all about creating online self-service capabilities for our customers. This is great for everyone! We’ve made it easy for the customer to get what they need; it’s cheaper and faster for organizations to deliver the service to the customer. Need a copy of your receipt? Want to know where your package is? No problem! Over the past decade, many companies have moved to self-service models that promote convenience, accuracy and speed for most normal, everyday transactions. But what if you don’t have a normal, everyday problem? Companies are taking three basic approaches to digital service strategies:

No Humans Available

How hard is it for your customers to get service?

How hard is it for your customers to get service?

Many of the big e-companies won’t even post a contact number on their site (or at least put it in an obvious place). Just try and find a human to talk to at Facebook, eBay, Twitter or Uber, for example. Most of these sites will first route you to the FAQ board (they want to help you help yourself), the community board (get other community members to help you), push you through the digital equivalent of a call center IVR (press 1 for this, press 2 for this, etc.). You get to the end of what seems like an infinite decision tree of questions and you still didn’t get the answer you were looking for. And if none of that works, maybe – just maybe – you’ll be allowed to submit an email to “customer support.”

Okay, this isn’t all bad – after all, people do ask a lot of dumb questions, but most online “Help Centers” aren’t very helpful if you don’t know how to ask the right question in the first place. Use at your own risk.

Unhappy Humans as a Plan B

Are your service reps THIS cheerful?

Are your service reps THIS cheerful?

I just went through this process with a newspaper I subscribe to. Just last week they served me with an account cancellation notice. The credit card tied to the account had expired four months earlier. I received no notifications that the card had expired, and they let me run up a tab before sending the cancellation notice.

Four things needed to be fixed: update credit card, pay outstanding balance, reinstate account, and continue service. Only one of these transactions could be completed on the web. I also discovered that home delivery and online subscription services were separate. I first attempted to fix all of my problems online, which turned out to be impossible. I caved and called customer service. After navigating an irrelevant IVR menu, I spent 15 minutes on hold before reaching a surly customer service representative. Everything got fixed, but really? Are my expectations too high?

Self-Service with Real Humans

Isn't it so much nicer when they're both cheery AND helpful?

Isn't it so much nicer when they're both cheery AND helpful?

One of my favorite examples of an organization that does this well is Progressive Insurance. Their online auto insurance quoting process takes about five minutes. As you go through the process, their rate-quote engine makes calls out to external data sources and predictive pricing models in real-time. If you have questions at any time during the quote, you can click-to-chat or call a customer agent. Your online information is saved in-session and the customer service reps can see where you are in the quote process without making you repeat any information. They’re there if you need them, but not if you don’t (and they’re pretty darn cheerful if you need assistance).

The reality today is that most businesses are technology driven, so digital services must become part of a company’s DNA. Digital service design is all about understanding what services the customer wants and then enabling technology to allow the customer to complete that service. It’s not about disintermediating humans from the process, but using technology to facilitate positive and profitable customer interactions.

And if your customers are not getting the service they want, they might just air their grievances on social media: #customerservicefail.

tags: customer service, Digital, real-time decisioning, social media analytics
12月 182014
 

Black Friday is the fourth Friday in the month of November.Few of us can have missed the scenes of frantic shoppers searching for that ultimate bargain on Black Friday. This is something fairly new in the UK, having originated in the United States to refer to the Friday following Thanksgiving Day. Legend has it that ‘black’ refers to the first day of the year that retailers operating on squeezed margins would go into profit, leaving the 'red' of loss and into ‘the black’. Black Friday really took off in the US around 2003 when it became the busiest shopping day of the year; and in the UK a few years later. And now Black Friday is followed by ‘Cyber Monday,’ when bargain hunters hit the net in search of the best deal.

In fact, according to The Guardian, Black Friday bargain hunters helped to lift UK retailers out of their usual November lull. Online spending went up by 37.5% from last year, while total retail sales were up 2.2% against same time in 2013.

Two new surveys shed light on the rapidly changing behaviour of consumers on both sides of the Atlantic:

Examining Christmas Shopping Patterns in the UK

The UK report with Conlumino looked at how effective discounting is, what factors affect forecasting, how relatively new phenomena such as widespread online retailing and ‘Black Friday’ are influencing behaviour?

CyberMondayMaureen Hinton, Global Research Director, Conlumino, said: “Having been first introduced to the UK market by Amazon just a few years ago, Black Friday and Cyber Monday have been increasingly embraced by UK shoppers. Americans traditionally view the Thanksgiving weekend as the start of the Christmas shopping season and – whilst UK shoppers don’t share that connection – the pro-activity of UK retailers with their heavy marketing and deep discounts, allied to the rising influence of e-retail, has played well to an enduring sense of austerity. According to our research, just under a fifth of shoppers have long planned to purchase Christmas gifts online on Cyber Monday as part of their Christmas shopping cycle, highlighting that the success of the weekend is down to a strong cocktail of impulse-led and planned purchasing behaviour.”

However, our research with Conlumino also showed that some consumers may regret their impulse buys; with almost three in four saying that online purchases should be allowed to be returned in store. We could term this pattern ‘Return & Run’ where shoppers simply return unwanted items or ‘Shop & Drop’ where they make new purchases at the same time as returning unwanted goods.

“Nonetheless”, adds Maureen Hinton “over two-thirds of UK shoppers feel that Christmas discounting is losing its impact, which is hardly surprising given that the last few years have seen retailers engaging in more and more promotional activity throughout the year. Against this backdrop, it will take deeper levels of discounting on the products and brands that shoppers actually want to effectively drive demand; over half of consumers are planning to shop around for the lowest price once they’ve picked their Christmas gifts. The weather is also a major concern for retailers … with 69% of large retailers saying that it has a medium-to-high influence on performance.”

XmasDiscountsWith shoppers becoming ever more unpredictable in their buying and returns behaviour, Black Friday no longer guarantees a healthy profit for retailers, even with the appeal of bargains, same day deliveries and ‘Click & Collect’ services.

Matching product promotions to different consumers is very complicated, but the good news is that data analysis provides the answers. Unfortunately, 44% of retailers said they still rely on gut feel for forecasting demand, and nearly half (47%) said they promote the same goods every year. Big data analytics extracts key insights from the data so retailers can accurately forecast demand for different products among different consumers, and ultimately deliver consumer satisfaction.

Searching for the ‘Average’ Shopper in the US

Meanwhile, over the Atlantic the search for the typical shopper was taking place. The US survey report details a view taken from the consumer’s perspective.  We found that she’s almost 46 years old, she shops for 13 people and plans to spend $1,119 (£720) on gifts. She will also indulge her significant other to the tune of $299 (£190).

The survey revealed seven dominant holiday shopping styles: the Black Friday Warrior, the Budget Buster, the Practical Shopper, the Perfect Gifter, the Cybershopper, the Last-Minute Hopeful and the Humbug (listed in descending order based on the average amount spent on Christmas gifts):

  • Black Friday Warriors (21%, average spend $1,422/£923) enjoys going to the shops and being part of the crowd. Has the longest gift list.
  • Budget Busters (11%, average spend $1,132/£724) generally end up over-spending, don’t mind paying more for convenience.
  • Practical Shoppers (21%, spends $1,108/£709) saves, sticks to their budget and does all of their shopping at once.
  • Perfect Gifters (19%, spends $1,056/£676) spends time searching for the perfect gift, loves to indulge family and friends.
  • Cybershoppers (19%, spends $955/£611) finds shopping stressful and is not inclined to take advantage of the Black Friday deals.
  • Last-Minute Hopefuls (5%, spends $955/£611) the least stressed group, they leave it all until Christmas Eve, picking up bargains and gift cards.
  • Humbugs (5%, spends $941/£602) are the opposite of Black Friday Warriors. They think Christmas decorations appear too soon, dislike crowds, don’t indulge loved ones and won’t pay for convenience. They are stingy, delay until the last minute and shun sales.

Alan Lipson, SAS Global Retail Industry Strategist said: “Our research suggests retailers should target the budget-conscious shopper during the Black Friday weekend. Alternate promotions are in order as the season progresses. Effectively appealing to different consumer segments – especially during the holiday season, when consumers aren’t shopping for themselves – is a complex puzzle. Analysing data is the only way to solve it.”

For a slightly different take on these findings, read this blog post written as a poem by Pamela Prentice titled, How many holiday shoppers will brave the crowds on Thanksgiving? Pamela, SAS's Chief Research Officer, is a talented writer and is apparently a budding poet as well.

Two Markets with Similar Challenges/Opportunities

On both sides of the Atlantic, the way consumers behave has changed, as have their purchasing patterns, how they react to discounts and promotions and how they shop both on and off line. Making sense of these changes to manage the challenges and capitalise on the opportunities is increasingly difficult. That's where the differentiating power of analytics can make a difference.

Retailers of all sizes are using marketing analytics to gain a fuller view of customers from online behaviours, social media sentiment, transactional data and other sources of data. Armed with that data, they are using real-time decisioning to inform customer interactions both online and in stores. These technologies better equip retailers to deliver customer experiences that make a difference on Black Friday, throughout the holiday season and all year long.

tags: marketing analytics, real-time decisioning, research, retail, social media analytics
9月 182014
 

Sunset over Marshall Field's Chicago, circa 2014

Sunset over Marshall Field's Chicago, circa 2014
[photo credit: Barry Butler Photography]

"Give the lady what she wants" and "The customer is always right" are quotes attributed to the venerable Chicago retailing pioneer Marshall Field. That customer-centered approach to doing business was leading-edge at the close of the 19th century and soon became a competitive advantage for Mr. Field's namesake department store empire.

Fast-forward more than a century, and it turns out that same customer-centered approach remains a best practice for marketing, but what's different is the operating environment. And in some ways, being customer centric is at once more challenging and more achievable than it was in the 1890s. The key lies in using marketing analytics.

In today's market, there are very few situations where one-size-fits-all marketing is the best approach. Customers are empowered, and unhappy customers will flock to competitors, often taking their friends with them. As a result, organizations can't afford to forgo efforts to know their customers as well as possible. And it's the companies that can quickly turn data into intelligence that have a leg up in the race to attract and retain their customers.

A recent TDWI checklist report, Applying Analytics with Big Data for Customer Intelligence, does a nice job of highlighting seven benefits from using marketing analytics and providing compelling examples of how those benefits play out in practice:

  1.  Gain a full view of customers across channels.
    Considering the explosion of channels facing marketers today, this benefit can't be overstated - bricks-and-mortar locations, kiosks, call centers mobile, partners, e-commerce, social media and more. A key first step is to develop a strategy for accessing and integrating customer data and then analyzing multiple sources.
  2. Become more proactive and effective.
    Marketing analytics can help organizations anticipate customer and market behavior and respond proactively. Marketing analytics includes solutions that perform statistical or data mining methods that enable you to develop and score predictive models based on combinations of variables.
  3. Personalize your marketing and customer engagements
    Marketing analytics enable organizations to explore how customers in defined segments behave differently, and even predict customers’ likelihood to respond to different offers. Doing that enables them to tailor the timing, content and delivery channel of offers to fit the preferences of customers, or to channel Marshall Field and "give the lady what she wants."
  4. Sharpen social media strategies
    This goes hand-in-hand with personalizing customer engagements, with the added benefit of getting an ongoing 24x7 focus group of sorts. By using social media analytics, organizations get a candid external perspective, can identify influencers, and can complete the picture of customer value.
  5. Engage your customers in real-time
    Combining speed with intelligence can provide a competitive advantage in-person, on line or on the phone. Real-time decisioning puts all channels on the same playing field enable the same care as the smartly-dressed attentive Marshall Fields' sales clerks of yore.
  6. Visualize success across the enterprise
    Data visualization brings analytics within reach of non-technical marketers, and therefore enables sharing, collaboration and decision-making to collectively become more efficient and effective.
  7. Treat data as a strategic asset
    If customer data weren't valuable, we wouldn't have hackers continually breaking in and stealing it. But locking it up in a vault is also not the answer. A balance has to be struck between data access for analytics and privacy and governance to safeguard the interests of both the organization and the customers.

Applying Analytics with Big Data for Customer Intelligence has much more detail than what I've summarized here, and it's worth the effort to download and read it.

Check it out and let me know what you think. As always, thank you for following!

tags: data visualization, marketing analytics, real-time decisioning, social media analytics, TDWI
3月 062014
 

Experiencing a major sporting event in person is a hard-to-describe experience for a fan. When your team is winning, a feeling of euphoria rolls through the stadium or arena. I have hugged and high-fived complete strangers when a game-winning shot goes in or someone scores a game-winning touchdown in the final seconds. On the other end, a loss brings a communal sense of disappointment – and sometimes tears.

This desk fan is not the kind we're talking about.

This is NOT the kind of fan we're talking about.

The in-stadium experience is what brings many fans through the turnstiles time and time again. They come in droves wearing jerseys of their favorite player, braving the rain and cold to see their beloved teams play. This isn’t anything new to sports teams. But how they are using analytics to increase revenue from the fanatics is new...and exciting.

At the MIT Sloan Sports Analytics Conference last week, noted author Tom Davenport published a SAS-sponsored research paper outlining how teams and leagues are embracing analytics. In it, he outlines five “frontier approaches” that those teams and leagues are using to increase fan loyalty – and increase revenue:

  1. Variable ticket pricing
  2. Personalized web content
  3. Season ticketholder segmentation
  4. Social media analytics
  5. Marketing optimization

Variable Ticket Pricing
Airlines and rental cars companies have been using variable ticket pricing for years. Certain seats and vehicles have more value to some travelers than others. Sports teams are benefitting from a similar model. Davenport references a recent report that says “26 of 30 Major League Baseball teams are using some sort of ticket pricing analytics for more flexible pricing.” It’s not just better seats or nights and weekends. The analytics behind this is how much more fans will pay to see a game against a marquee opponent compared to a cellar-dweller.

Personalized Web Content
When fans aren’t watching a game in person or on TV, they’re often reading about the team online. Personalized web content is an area where teams and leagues can connect to their fans – and create cross-sell and up-sell opportunities. “The goal is to not treat all fans as if they were alike, and to develop increasingly targeted approaches to marketing based on a fan’s history and past purchases,” Davenport says. Imagine seeing your favorite player’s jersey pop up for purchase or deals on game tickets for the days that you have been in the past. Makes it easy to click “buy,” doesn’t it?

Season Ticketholder Segmentation
Speaking of tickets, season tickets are critical for teams each year. With thousands of seats that must be filled for each game, knowing that the most expensive and desirable seats are sold sure does make marketing and planning easier. Teams like the Orlando Magic are using season ticketholder segmentation to both identify which ticket holders are likely to renew as well as those likely to lapse.  Davenport also looks at one of the most successful NFL franchises, the New England Patriots, which are incorporating marketing analytics into the mix by exploring “which channels in what sequence are best to communicate with season ticketholders.” The results speak for themselves – a 97 percent renewal rate!

Social media analytics
Teams and leagues learn what their fans really think about teams, players, trades and the in-stadium experience with social media analytics - not just listening, but by accurately discerning tone and sentiment. Here’s a great example: The Phoenix Suns currently sit in seventh place in the NBA’s Western Conference. This proud franchise has missed the playoffs for three seasons, so its fan base is especially excited this year. After a recent win over the Atlanta Hawks, the Suns’ Facebook page included positive comments about the team, coach and players:

 Comments from the Phoenix Suns' Facebook page

While it’s normal for fans to be excited after a win, social media analytics takes words, phrases and conversations from a variety of online channels to deliver deeper, more holistic insights into what’s being said about a team or league. A team might not lower prices based on one comment, but if there is a negative trend about ticket or concession prices, having that information will help executives make an informed decision about how to proceed. Davenport’s take? Teams aren’t yet utilizing automated analytics of social media content, but this is a frontier practice likely to grow substantially over time.

Marketing Optimization
Many businesses derive great value from using marketing optimization - especially if their segmentation is complex or customers are active across multiple channels. Sports teams have not yet embraced optimization, so it remains a high-impact growth area precisely because their business models have become more complex. One potential impact is on game-day promotions and ticket sales. For example, understanding which profile of customer is likely to respond to a promotion of bobbleheads versus food & beverage discounts could be a very effective way to maximize the lift in same-day ticket sales and fill more empty seats and increase merchandise receipts. According to Davenport’s research, the Cleveland Indians are one team that use marketing mix models to dig deep into how they should optimize their marketing programs and budgets. Somewhere, there’s a Nick Swisher bobblehead doll nodding in approval.

The MIT Sloan Sports Analytics Conference last week highlighted areas in every major sport where analytics are making an impact on the field and in front offices. Tom Davenport’s paper not only outlines where it’s happening today, he also paints a positive picture for the future. And while professional sports teams and leagues still use the eyeball test – what you see is what you get – to make decisions, putting data and analytics to work will open up a world of additional possibilities and outcomes.

Just imagine what it could do for your business - let us show you how. Give us a call or drop us a line. And thank you for following!

tags: marketing analytics, marketing optimization, social media analytics, sports, sports analytics, tom davenport
12月 072013
 
On Thanksgiving, I took a few moments out of my day to use the real-time Twitter search capabilities of SAS Social Media Analytics, and the search term #thankful. I didn’t do this because it’s almost year-end review time and I can say I worked on a holiday. Not entirely, anyway. [...]
11月 282013
 
The Castle has the best view of Budapest, but how are the reviews?

The Castle may have the best views in Budapest, but how are the reviews?

My colleague Kelly McGuire recently teamed with Associate Professor Breffni Noone at The Pennsylvania State University to study the role of reviews and ratings and price on purchase decisions in the hotel sector. Their findings confirmed the relationship linking ratings and reviews with quality and value perceptions of hotel room purchases that they'd found in a previous study.

While their research focused on the hospitality industry, it's not a stretch to see how negative reviews can impact purchase decisions in other industries.

Kelly summarized the four biggest take-aways from their study as follows:

  1. Reviews and price are the most important influencers of choice. While consumers did pay attention to aggregate ratings, TripAdvisor rank and to a lesser extent, brand, positive reviews contributed the most to consumer choice behavior followed by lower price.
  2. Negative reviews remove you from the choice set. Period.  Lower price or higher ratings do not overcome the impact of negative reviews.  Consumers simply will not choose a hotel with negative reviews.  Hotels that are in this unfortunate situation should focus energies on improving their reputation.
  3. Consumers prefer to pay a lower price. While consumers would go for a higher-priced hotel when the reviews and ratings were better than the alternatives, all things being equal, they will look for the lowest price.  Hotels need to understand their position relative to their competition both on reputation and on price in order to take advantage of any pricing power associated with positive UGC.
  4. Consumers only notice high ratings and rankings.  Our results showed that consumers only notice ratings and rankings when they are high as compared to other choices.  Consumers do not place any value on the comparison between low and mid-level ratings and rankings.

For more details about this research and the findings, read Kelly's blog post, "Pricing in a Social World: How consumers use ratings, reviews and price when choosing a hotel."

As you think about what this might mean for your organization, your first thought might settle on how to manage a bad review - or worse yet, a string of bad reviews. And the bigger your operation, the harder it is to even find out about issues with your reputation. Social Media Analytics can help you keep a pulse on "the buzz" about your brand so you can catch issues early.

Then there's the more strategic question of the root cause of bad reviews, which come from bad customer experiences. And considering how customers experience most brands both online and offline, customer experience management has broad implications in the enterprise far beyond marketing. Adaptive Customer Experience can help manage the online experience of your customers, but engaging with your contact center or customer experience department in addition to getting the messages from your marketing campaigns means more opportunities for miscues and more chances for wrong expectations that can lead to negative reviews.

An integrated marketing management approach that drives the necessary customer-centric focus is how to address the impact of bad customer reviews. It's also how to align your organization around preventing the bad customer experiences that lead to negative reviews. It's far easier said than done, but well worth the effort. And we have many examples of how well it works - please contact us and find out how it can work for you.

As always, thank you for following!

tags: customer experience management, gaming & hospitality, integrated marketing management, social media analytics
11月 282013
 
The Castle has the best view of Budapest, but how are the reviews?

The Castle may have the best views in Budapest, but how are the reviews?

My colleague Kelly McGuire recently teamed with Associate Professor Breffni Noone at The Pennsylvania State University to study the role of reviews and ratings and price on purchase decisions in the hotel sector. Their findings confirmed the relationship linking ratings and reviews with quality and value perceptions of hotel room purchases that they'd found in a previous study.

While their research focused on the hospitality industry, it's not a stretch to see how negative reviews can impact purchase decisions in other industries.

Kelly summarized the four biggest take-aways from their study as follows:

  1. Reviews and price are the most important influencers of choice. While consumers did pay attention to aggregate ratings, TripAdvisor rank and to a lesser extent, brand, positive reviews contributed the most to consumer choice behavior followed by lower price.
  2. Negative reviews remove you from the choice set. Period.  Lower price or higher ratings do not overcome the impact of negative reviews.  Consumers simply will not choose a hotel with negative reviews.  Hotels that are in this unfortunate situation should focus energies on improving their reputation.
  3. Consumers prefer to pay a lower price. While consumers would go for a higher-priced hotel when the reviews and ratings were better than the alternatives, all things being equal, they will look for the lowest price.  Hotels need to understand their position relative to their competition both on reputation and on price in order to take advantage of any pricing power associated with positive UGC.
  4. Consumers only notice high ratings and rankings.  Our results showed that consumers only notice ratings and rankings when they are high as compared to other choices.  Consumers do not place any value on the comparison between low and mid-level ratings and rankings.

For more details about this research and the findings, read Kelly's blog post, "Pricing in a Social World: How consumers use ratings, reviews and price when choosing a hotel."

As you think about what this might mean for your organization, your first thought might settle on how to manage a bad review - or worse yet, a string of bad reviews. And the bigger your operation, the harder it is to even find out about issues with your reputation. Social Media Analytics can help you keep a pulse on "the buzz" about your brand so you can catch issues early.

Then there's the more strategic question of the root cause of bad reviews, which come from bad customer experiences. And considering how customers experience most brands both online and offline, customer experience management has broad implications in the enterprise far beyond marketing. Adaptive Customer Experience can help manage the online experience of your customers, but engaging with your contact center or customer experience department in addition to getting the messages from your marketing campaigns means more opportunities for miscues and more chances for wrong expectations that can lead to negative reviews.

An integrated marketing management approach that drives the necessary customer-centric focus is how to address the impact of bad customer reviews. It's also how to align your organization around preventing the bad customer experiences that lead to negative reviews. It's far easier said than done, but well worth the effort. And we have many examples of how well it works - please contact us and find out how it can work for you.

As always, thank you for following!

tags: customer experience management, gaming & hospitality, integrated marketing management, social media analytics
8月 212013
 

Last week I described our social media monitoring and response pilot, and this week I’d like to talk about some key takeaways and lessons learned while working on the pilot.

Leveraging knowledge across the enterprise is key

Developing a First Responders list enabled our team to respond quickly, while leveraging key skills and expertise throughout SAS worldwide. We also learned about our existing online resources and optimized our searching methods to point users to sites like the SAS Knowledge Base and SAS Community Groups on our customer support website so we could field more technical inquires on our own and point users to existing information.

Be ready to communicate with a worldwide audience

Social media blurs the boundaries of country barriers and provides an open landscape for communication. By listening and monitoring, we were able to engage and add value to a worldwide audience. We realized quickly in the pilot that 50 percent of inquiries and posts we monitored were from outside the US and that US and international contacts were engaging with each other.

Communication tactics and response times vary across social channels

Not all social media channels are created equal. We found that LinkedIn has more business professionals looking for advice and recommendations, and are less tolerant of marketing/sales pushes. Each group has its own norms, is monitored by a group monitor, and holds active members who contribute on a regular basis. Expected turnaround on a reply can vary because posts remain active for days to months and many users search previous discussions to gather information on certain topics of interest.

Twitter response time expectations are more immediate. Messages are short and typically express more emotions with content following a shorter life cycle. While content does not carry over months like with LinkedIn, you will see some of the same people who do tweet often. Prominent users tend to be students, influencers, brand advocates, or adversaries, and subtle pushes from marketing and product messages are more acceptable.

Overall, the marketing contact center has enjoyed our crash course in social media and the opportunities it has provided to help SAS customers and amplify their successes. It has been fun to develop rapport with customers and create a brand voice for our responses that is swift, agile and real.

tags: customer support, sas, social media analytics