Tech

2月 172018
 

Keyboard MacrosIt is not laziness—it is efficiency!!! Programmers are often called lazy; we even call ourselves lazy. But we are not lazy, we are just being efficient. It makes no sense to type the same code over and over again or use more keystrokes than are absolutely necessary.

Keyboard Macros

You might not have heard of keyboard macros. Or, perhaps, you do not know how they could help you. I am very fond of keyboard macros; let me show you why!

In SAS Technical Support, supporting the SAS® Output Delivery System (ODS) and Base SAS® procedures, I often use the same statements to set up test programs. For example, I want any style templates that I create to go into the Work directory. I also use the same data set name all of the time. I have created keyboard macros for the statements, data set names, and options that I use daily.

When I press Ctrl+Alt+w, the following is inserted into my program:

ods path(prepend) work.templat(update);

When I press Ctrl+Alt+p, the following is inserted into my program:

sashelp.class

How did I do that? I recorded a keyboard macro that contains the code that I want. Then, I assigned keys that insert the code when I press them.

Here are the steps for recording your very own keyboard macro in the SAS Enhanced Editor:

1.  Select Tools ► Keyboard Macros ► Record New Macro.

2.  Enter the code that you want to be your new keyboard macro. Consider typing slowly because any backspaces that you use are included in the recording.

3.  After you are done entering text, you need to tell SAS to stop recording. Select Tools ►Keyboard Macros ►Stop Recording.

4.  A pop-up dialog box appears that lets you give the new macro a name and assign the keys that you want to be associated with the macro. You can set the key combination that make sense to you. Just make sure that you do not use a combination that is already assigned to another macro.

Now, whenever you need to insert that piece of code, just use the keys that you assigned!

In SAS® Enterprise Guide®, you can find keyboard macros under Program ► Editor Macros, instead of the Tools drop-down menu. The recording and key assignment steps are the same in both applications.

You can also create keyboard macros that perform tasks.

The Macros selection opens a pop-up dialog box that contains a Create button.

Clicking Create opens another dialog box.

With the Categories option set to All, you can see all of the commands that are already available. Moving these over to the Keyboard macro contents section enables you to build a macro that performs a task that you need to accomplish on a regular basis.

For example, I have combined these commands to select a whole block of code, like from the PROC statement down to the RUN statement.

Keyboards macros are available in the Enhanced Editor in Display Manager SAS (DMS) and in SAS Enterprise Guide. They cannot be used with the Program Editor in DMS or in SAS® Studio.

You can export and import keyboard macros. The file created when you export has the .kmf extension. You can find the options for importing and exporting in the Macros dialog box. You can share your keyboard macros with your friends, or just to keep them as a backup copy in case you need to reinstall SAS.

For more information, see the Using "Keyboard Macros" section in "Using the Enhanced Editor."

Function Keys

You have probably used the F8 key to submit your program, or the F4 key to recall your last program. Did you know that you can set or change those instructions?

In the Enhanced Editor, you can get the list of assigned keys by entering keys into the command bar or by selecting Keys under Tools ► Options.

I test a lot, which means that I am routinely clearing the log, the results viewer, and the output window. I have assigned an F key, F12, to clear everything and bring the focus back to the Enhanced Editor (see the commands in the screenshot below). I have to press only one key to clean everything up! I use the F12 key over and over again.

The keys that you assign in DMS are valid from both the Enhanced Editor and the Program Editor.

SAS Enterprise Guide includes a large number of commands by default. A lot of them already have keys assigned, but some do not. You can see the list of the commands and their assigned keys by selecting Enhanced Editor Keys under the Program drop-down menu.

Currently, it is not possible to modify the function keys in SAS Studio. However, a number of keys are already defined that you might find useful. You can see the function key shortcuts by clicking the question mark in the upper right, choosing SAS Studio help, and then selecting the option for Accessibility Features. Here are links to additional resources:

I highly recommend using keyboard macro and function keys. Why type the same thing over and over again? Increase your productivity by handing the repetitive tasks over to SAS.

Efficiency at your fingertips: Keyboard macros and function keys was published on SAS Users.

2月 162018
 

pricing and promotionThe consumer packaged goods (CPG) and Retail industry are going through a period of significant change. Both retailers and manufacturers are struggling to find growth and improve profitability. One strategy is through consolidation - e.g., Kraft-Heinz, Keurig- Dr Pepper Snapple Group on the manufacturer side, as well as Safeway-Albertsons, Ahold-Delhaize, Walgreens-Rite Aid on the retailer side. The thinking here is that these mergers would lead to large operational efficiencies and focused growth strategies.

Another important lever to drive growth is pricing and promotion. Companies have realized the importance of getting the pricing right and running high-impact promotions in a highly competitive market. As consumer shop multiple channels and new retail formats begin to permeate (e.g., smaller format stores, new entrants such as Aldi and Lidl), the importance of price-promo continues to increase. Pricing and promotion have become the second largest item on CPG manufacturer’s P&L, after cost-of-goods. Similarly for retailers, price-promo decisions have become critical for growth, maybe even survival. This is manifested in the growth in investment focused on pricing and promotion decisions. In some cases this investment could be as much as 20-25% of net revenue of the company.

However, despite the heavy investment in price-promo, the impact of these decisions is declining. A recent IRI study indicated that the price and promo elasticities (response of volume to pricing change) have been steadily declining over the past 3-4 years. Consumers are willing to buy less when faced with decreases in “regular or base” price as well as promoted price.  The study indicated that the “lift” from promotions had decreased by about 1,000 basis points over the past four years.  There is, therefore, an immediate need to manage price and promotion decisions in a more creative and impactful manner.

Three areas of improvement

What does this mean? What can companies do to improve the impact of their pricing and promotion investment? We believe that there are three important areas of improvement. The first area is around a more refined understanding of the impact of price-promo decisions.  The new focus is on understanding the true impact of merchandising through both traditional and new lenses, including stockpiling, cross-retailer pricing and advanced price engines. Being able to more accurately predict the pattern of consumer behavior allows for automation and faster and better decisions.

The second area is around rapid and dynamic decision making. This involves a focus on new techniques such as Artificial Intelligence and Machine Learning to drive price-promo decisions. AI/ML is already getting entrenched within demand identification, product development and in-market execution as well as marketing. Within CPG and retail pricing, this will be accomplished by (a) speed in dealing with the regularly-repeated manual tasks in an efficient manner and (b) new levels of insight and accuracy based upon market trends that enable pricing analysts to focus their efforts on the areas that matter in a dynamic manner. It is imperative to move from a user-driven, manual pricing adjustments to dynamic “smart solutions.”

Another important area of change in pricing and promotion is “personalized pricing;”that is allowing manufacturers and retailers to customize price-promo decisions towards individual consumer/shopper segments. This is done by combining frequent shopper (FSP) data with traditional price-promo modeling for an in-depth evaluation of merchandising strategies as well as developing custom offers that would stimulate demand within these segments. IRI research shows that FSP/loyalty card holders react differently to brand price changes. For example, Brand Loyals react stronger to base price changes, while Brand Non-Loyals react stronger to base price reductions, promotional prices and quality merchandising tactics​.

In our session titled “New Frontiers in Pricing Analytics” at the SAS Global Forum 2018, we will provide a detailed overview of the state of the industry and how it is evolving. We will provide an overview of the new techniques and technologies in this space as well as where things are headed in the future. We hope to see you there.

 

Shifting sands in pricing and promotion was published on SAS Users.

2月 152018
 

How effective is your organization at leveraging data and analytics to power your business models?

This question is surprising hard for many organizations to answer.  Most organizations lack a roadmap against which they can measure their effectiveness for using data and analytics to optimize key business processes, uncover new business opportunities or deliver a differentiated customer experience. They do not understand what’s possible with respect to integrating big data and data science into the organization’s business model (see Figure 1).

the economic value of data

Figure 1: Big Data Business Model Maturity Index

My SAS Global Forum 2018 presentation on Tuesday April 10, 2018 will discuss the transformative potential of big data and advanced analytics, and will leverage the Big Data Business Model Maturity Index as a guide for helping organizations understand where and how they can leverage data and analytics to power their business models.

Digital Twins, Analytics Profiles and the Power of One

We all understand that the volume and variety of data are increasing exponentially.  Your customers are leaving their digital fingerprints across the Internet via their website, social media, and mobile devices usage.  The Internet of Things will unleash an estimated 44 Zettabytes of data across 7 billion connected people by 2020.

However, big data isn’t really about big; it’s about small. It’s about understanding your customer and product behaviors at the level of the individual.  Big Data is about building detailed behavioral or analytic profiles for each individual (see Figure 2).

Figure 2: Building Individual Behavioral or Analytic Profiles

If you want to better serve your customers, you need to understand their tendencies, behaviors, inclinations, preferences, interests and passions at the level of each individual customer.

Customers’ expectations of their vendors are changing due to their personal experiences.  From recommending products, services, movies, music, routes and even spouses, customers are expecting their vendors to understand they well enough that these vendors can provide a hyper-personalized customer experience.

Demystifying Data Science (AI | ML | DL)

Too many organizations are spending too much time confusing too many executives on the capabilities of data science.  The concept of data science is simple; data science is about identifying the variables and metrics that might be better predictors of business and operational performance (see Figure 3).

Figure 3: A Moneyball Definition of Data Science

Whether using basic statistics, predictive analytics, data mining, machine learning, or deep learning, almost all of data science benefits are achieved from the simple formula of: Input (A) → Response (B).

Source: Andrew Ng, “What Artificial Intelligence Can and Can’t Do Right Now”

By collaborating closely with the business subject matter experts to choosing Input (A), those variables and metrics that might be better predictor of performance, the data science team can achieve more accurate, more granular, lower latency Response (B).  And the creative creation and selection of Input (A) creatively has already revolutionized many industries, and is poised to revolutionize more.

Data Monetization and the Economic Value of Data

Data is an unusual asset – it doesn’t deplete, it doesn’t wear out and it can be used across an infinite number of use cases at near zero marginal cost.  Organizations have no other assets with those unique characteristics.  And while traditional accounting methods of valuing assets works well with physical assets, account methods fall horribly – dangerously – short in properly determining the economic value of data.

Instead of using traditional accounting techniques to determine the value of the organization’s data, apply economic and data science concepts to determine the economic value of the data based upon it’s ability to optimize key business and operational processes, reduce compliance and security risks, uncover new revenue opportunities and create a more compelling, differentiated customer experience (see Figure 4).

Figure 4: Data Lake 3.0: Collaborative Value Creation Platform

The data lake, which can house both data and analytic models, is transformed from a simple data repository into a “collaborative value creation platform” that facilities the capture, refinement and sharing of the data and analytic digital assets across the enterprise.

Creating the Intelligent Enterprise

When you add up all of these concepts and advancements – Big Data, Analytic Profiles, Data Science and the Economic Value of Data – organizations are poised for digital transformation (see Figure 5).

Figure 5: Achieving Digital Transformation

And what is Digital Transformation?

Digital Transformation is application of digital capabilities to processes, products, and assets to improve efficiency, enhance customer value, manage risk, and uncover new monetization opportunities.

Looking forward to seeing you at my SAS Global Forum 2018 session and helping your organizations on its digital transformation!

Data monetization and the economic value of data was published on SAS Users.

2月 082018
 

In my last article, I worked with an example of using custom polygon data to create a regional geo map in SAS Visual Analytics 7.4. In this article, I will use almost the same example to illustrate the ease of implementing custom polygons to produce the same regional map in SAS Visual Analytics 8.2.

In this example, as in my last blog, the site has sales data for each sales region in the US and would like to display a geo map of the regions.

The six sales regions are:

Custom polygons in SAS Visual Analytics

We will again start with the MAPSGFK.US_STATES dataset, which contains the data required to overlay all states of the US on a VA region geomap and has these columns:

As in my last post, we will add the sales regions (REGION) column and values using data step code, and then use GREMOVE to remove the state boundaries, leaving the region boundary points.  For a look at that code, see my previous blog.

The following datastep adds the necessary columns/values to the polygon dataset so that the form of the data is what is expected by VA.  Note that the LAT and LONG columns are already in unprojected form, so we just assign those values to Y and X, so our column names will more closely match what we will see in the VA interface when creating the geographic data item.   We also create a SEQUENCE column, required by VA 8.2,  using the values of the internal variable, _n_.

data mydata.regions;
   set mydata.regions;
   sequence=_n_;
   id=region;
   x=long;
   y=lat;
   keep ID SEQUENCE SEGMENT X Y ;
   run;

The polygon table, REGIONS,  now has the following columns.

The dataset containing the region and measure data, REGIONSALES contains these columns:

Both datasets should be loaded into memory. Sign in to SAS Visual Analytics – Explore and Visualize Data and create a new report with data source REGIONSALES.

Create a new Geography data item from REGION as shown below, also specifying a New Polygon Provider with values shown on the next several screen shots.  Give the new provider a name and label, and specify the CAS server, library, and table name.

Scroll down to add the ID, Sequence, Segment, latitude and longitude columns.

The new geography data item, after clicking OK:

Now create a Geo Map of type Regions as shown:

Please Creating a regional map with custom polygons in SAS Visual Analytics 8.2 was published on SAS Users.

2月 082018
 

By default, SAS Visual Analytics 7.4 supports country and state level polygons for regional geomaps. In SAS Visual Analytics 7.4, custom shape files are now supported, as well. This means that if a site has their own custom polygon data that defines custom regions, it’s possible to create a region geomap that displays those regions.

Implementing the process requires completing some preparatory steps, explicitly execution of some SAS code, but the steps are explained in Appendix 2 of the SAS Visual Analytics 7.4: Administration Guide. The SAS program that completes the steps is provided for download at http://support.sas.com/rnd/datavisualization/vageo/va74polygons.sas.

Two examples using the program are provided in Appendix 2 for US counties and German provinces. The instructions in Appendix 2 assume that the custom polygon data is provided in ESRI shape file format, which is likely the most common use-case. The site will need access to a SAS programming environment and SAS/GRAPH software, and whoever completes the process will need access to the SAS Visual Analytics configuration directory and the ability to restart services—so an administrator-type person will be required.

One common request is to provide a regional geomap, where the regions are site-defined groups of states or provinces of a country. In this example problem, the site has sales data for each sales region in the US and would like to display a geo map of the regions.

Custom regional map in SAS Visual AnalyticsFor this type of region/province example, you will likely be able to use one of the maps already provided by SAS in the MAPSGFK library to produce your region boundaries. For more information on the datasets in the MAPSGFK library, see this paper. 

The MAPSGFK.US_STATES dataset contains the data required to overlay all states of the US on a VA region geomap and has these columns:

The highlighted columns, STATECODE, LONG, and LAT will be particularly useful, but first, the sales region (REGION) column and values must be added using simple data step code. The unnecessary FIPS code (STATE) can be dropped in the same DATA step.  Note that the region values are assigned in upper case, as these will later be converted to ID values, which VA expects to be in upper case.

data regions;
   length region $ 12;
   drop state;
   set mapsgfk.us_states;
      if statecode in ('AK','HI','PR') then delete;
      else if statecode in ('WA','MT','OR','ID','WY')
         then region='NORTHWEST';
      else if statecode in ('CA','NV','UT','AZ','CO','NM')
         then region='SOUTHWEST'; 
      else if statecode in ('ND','SD','NE','MN','WI','MI','IA','IL','IN')
         then region='NORTHCENTRAL'; 
      else if statecode in ('KS','OK','TX','MO','AR')
         then region='SOUTHCENTRAL'; 
      else if statecode in ('ME','NH','VT','MA','RI','CT','NY','PA','NJ','OH','DE',
'MD','DC')then region='NORTHEAST';
      else if statecode in ('KY','WV','VA','TN','NC','MS','AL','LA','GA','SC','FL')
         then region='SOUTHEAST';
      run;

The data is then sorted by the REGION values, a requirement of the SAS/GRAPH GREMOVE procedure, which is used to remove the internal state boundary data points, leaving the region boundary points only.

proc sort data=regions;
   by region;
 proc gremove data=regions out=mapscstm.regions1;
    by region;
    id statecode;
    run;

To complete the process, since the LAT and LONG values are already in the form that VA needs (unprojected) and we are using a SAS dataset rather than the ESRI shape file format, we’ll only use a part of the code from the downloadable program mentioned at the beginning of the blog.

First, create a mapscstm directory under /SASHome/SASFoundation/9.4 to store the custom polygon dataset.  Make sure that the library is accessible to the SAS session by including a libname statement in the appserver_autoexec_usermods.sas file, found in config/Lev1/SASApp, and then restarting the Object Spawner.

Example:

libname MAPSCSTM “SASHome/SASFoundation/9.4/mapscstm”;

Tip:  Be sure to back up the original ATTRLOOKUP and CENTLOOKUP datasets before running any additional code, as you will be modifying the originals.

To complete creation of the polygon dataset, you will need to execute only a part of the downloadable program to:
• Make sure that your polygon dataset has all of the columns expected by SAS Visual Analytics.
• Add the region attributes to the ATTRLOOKUP.
• Add the region center point locations to the CENTLOOKUP dataset.

%let REGION_LABEL=USRegions;   /* The label for the custom region */
 %let REGION_PREFIX=R1; /* unique ISO 2-Letter Code  */
 %let REGION_ISO=000; /* unique ISO Code  */
 %let REGION_DATASET=MAPSCSTM.REGIONS1;  /* Polygon data set to be 
              created - be sure to use suffix "1" */

Note that the downloadable program includes additional macro assignments and additional code, but since our data is already in the form of a SAS dataset, rather than ESRI shape file format, we won’t be using all of the code.

The following datastep adds the necessary columns/values to the polygon dataset so that the form of the data is what is expected by VA.  Note that the LAT and LONG columns are already in unprojected form, so we just assign the same values to X and Y.  (VA doesn’t actually use the X,Y columns from the polygon dataset.)

data &REGION_DATASET.;
   set &REGION_DATASET.;
   where density <= 3; 
   id=region;
   idname=region;
   x=long;  
   y=lat;
   ISO = "&REGION_ISO.";
   RESOLUTION = 1;
   LAKE = 0;
   ISOALPHA2 = "&REGION_PREFIX.";
   AdminType = "regions";
   keep ID SEGMENT IDNAME LONG LAT X Y ISO DENSITY RESOLUTION LAKE ISOALPHA2 AdminType;
   run;

Then PROC SQL steps are executed to add rows relative to the custom polygons to the ATTRLOOKUP and CENTLOOKUP datasets:

This step adds the USRegions row to ATTRLOOKUP:

proc sql;
   insert into valib.attrlookup
      values ( 
         "&REGION_LABEL.",         /* IDLABEL=State/Province Label */
         "&REGION_PREFIX.",        /* ID=SAS Map ID Value */
         "&REGION_LABEL.",         /* IDNAME=State/Province Name */
         "",                       /* ID1NAME=Country Name */
         "",                       /* ID2NAME */
         "&REGION_ISO.",           /* ISO=Country ISO Numeric Code */
         "&REGION_LABEL.",         /* ISONAME */
         "&REGION_LABEL.",         /* KEY */
         "",                       /* ID1=Country ISO 2-Letter Code */
         "",                       /* ID2 */
         "",                       /* ID3 */
         "",                       /* ID3NAME */
         0                         /* LEVEL (0=country level, 1=state level) */
         );
quit;

This step adds a row to ATTRLOOKUP for each individual region:

proc sql;
   insert into valib.attrlookup
      select distinct 
         IDNAME,            /* IDLABEL=State/Province Label */
         ID,                /* ID=SAS Map ID Value */
         IDNAME,            /* IDNAME=State/Province Name */
 
         "&REGION_LABEL.",  /* ID1NAME=Country Name */
         "",                /* ID2NAME */
         "&REGION_ISO.",    /* ISO=Country ISO Numeric Code */
         "&REGION_LABEL.",  /* ISONAME */
         trim(IDNAME) || "|&REGION_LABEL.",  /* KEY */
         "&REGION_PREFIX.",   /* ID1=Country ISO 2-Letter Code */
         "",                  /* ID2 */
         "",                  /* ID3 */
         "",                  /* ID3NAME */
         1                    /* LEVEL (1=state level) */
   from &REGION_DATASET.;
quit;

This step calculates and adds the central location point for each of the regions to the CENTLOOKUP dataset.   The site data contains only the 48 contiguous states (no Alaska or Hawaii). If Alaska and Hawaii had been included, a different algorithm would need to be used to calculate the central location.

proc sql;
   /* Add custom region */
   insert into valib.centlookup
      select distinct
         "&REGION_DATASET." as mapname,
         "&REGION_PREFIX." as ID,
         avg(x) as x,
         avg(y) as y
      from &REGION_DATASET.;
 
   /* Add custom provinces */
   insert into valib.centlookup
      select distinct
         "&REGION_DATASET." as mapname,
         ID as ID,
         avg(x) as x,
         avg(y) as y
      from &REGION_DATASET.
         group by id;
quit;

After executing the code above, you will need to restart the Web Application server, so that SAS Visual Analytics has access to the new polygons.

Code is also included in the downloadable program to create a dataset for validating your results. The validate dataset includes a column for the ID and IDNAME of the regions, in addition to two randomly calculated measures.  In our case, we will instead just use our original REGIONSALES dataset containing the regional sales data.

1. Sign into SAS Visual Analytics and create a new exploration with data source REGIONSALES.
2. Create a Geo data item from State: Right-click Regions, select Geography?Subdivision(State, Province) Names. From the Country or Region drop-down list, select the USRegions region label.
3. Create a geo map visualization. Select Regions for the map style, Regions for the Geography role, and salesamt for the Color role.

Your regions should display, similar to this:

You can also include the region data item in a hierarchy with the state data item to produce a drill-down region map:

Or a bubble or coordinate map:

I hope this example has been helpful to users of SAS Visual Analytics 7.4.  In my next blog, you will see that this process is tremendously simplified by new mapping features in SAS Visual Analytics 8.2.

Creating a custom regional map in SAS Visual Analytics 7.4 was published on SAS Users.

2月 072018
 

Jazz up your Geo Map or Network Analysis graph by applying icon-based display rule markers instead of color markers on the map. With SAS Visual Analytics, you may have already used display rules by populating intervals or adding color-mapped values for report objects. Now, you can jazz up your Geo Map or Network Analysis object by choosing from a curated set of icons and applying icon-based display rule markers.SAS Visual Analytics Geo Map

The set of curated icons in SAS Visual Analytics 8.2 are classified into these groups for use with icon-based display rules:

SAS Visual Analytics Geo Map
Here is an example of the display-rule icons that are available for Status:

SAS Visual Analytics Geo Map
When your mouse hovers over an icon, the name of that icon is displayed.

Applying Icon-Based Display Rules to a Geo Map

While working with a data source that included a measure for the total number of cellular mobile subscriptions per 100 in each country, I wanted to display the results in a Geo Map. Before creating the display rules, I looked at the data for the mobile cellular subscriptions for various countries, and decided that I wanted to create four display rules, each one associated with the number of mobile cellular subscriptions per 100. The icons that I wanted for my display rules were all available under Status. So here’s how I decided to set up my operators, values, and the icon style and color:


Here are the steps I followed to setup the icon-based display rules.

Create the New Geography Item

1.  In my new SAS Visual Analytics 8.2 report, I went to Objects, chose Geo Map (available under Graphs) and dragged it over to the blank canvas.
2.  From Data, I searched for my data source and added it to the report.
3.  In my data source, I highlighted the category (Country), right clicked, and selected New Geography.
4.  In the New Geography Item dialog, I entered a name for the new geographic item that I was creating: Country (Geographic Item).

Change Geo Map Type to Coordinates

5.  I select the Geo Map, go to Options in SAS Visual Analytics and scroll down to Map.
6.  By default, the Type is set to Bubbles. I change it to Coordinates (this is a requirement to create the icon-based display rules).


7.  The default size for the Marker size is 11. I change it to 14 because I would like my markers to show up slightly bigger in the Geo Map.
8.   By default, Legend is displayed for the Geo Map and Visibility is set to On. I chose not to display Legend information for the Geo Map, so I chose Off for Visibility.

Choose Role for the Geo Map

9.  I choose Roles, and I am ready to assign the geographic data item to Category. So I choose the Country (Geographic Item) that I had just created, and drag it over to Category. I now see the Country (Geographic) data role applied to the Geo Map.

Create Icon-Based Display Rules for the Geo Map

10.  I click on Rules and under Display Rules, I click on New rule.


11.  In the New Display Rule dialog, I chose <= for Operator and entered a 250 for Value.
12.  I click on Style and choose Red as the color for this display rule.


13.  I click on Icon, and I am presented with seven categories for the icons. When I hover an icon, the icon name is displayed.
14.  I click on the Significantly Lower icon and click OK.


15.  A quick review of what I just created and I click OK.


16.  I continue to create three additional display rules for my Geo Map.

Now, I have completed creating the four display rules. Here’s how they show in the SAS Visual Analytics Viewer:


17.  When all of the display rules have been created, the Geo Map displays with the colorful icon-based display rules applied to the various countries.


You’ve just seen how you can create icon-based display rules for a Geo Map. You can also create icon-based display rules for a Network Analysis object as well.

Jazz up a Geo Map with colorful icon-based display rules was published on SAS Users.

1月 272018
 

Are you interested in using SAS Visual Analytics 8.2 to visualize a state by regions, but all you have is a county shapefile?  As long as you can cross-walk counties to regions, this is easier to do than you might think.

Here are the steps involved:

Step 1

Obtain a county shapefile and extract all components to a folder. For example, I used the US Counties shapefile found in this SAS Visual Analytics community post.

Note: Shapefile is a geospatial data format developed by ESRI. Shapefiles are comprised of multiple files. When you unzip the shapefile found on the community site, make sure to extract all of its components and not just the .shp. You can get more information about shapefiles from this Wikipedia article:  https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shapefile.

Step 2

Run PROC MAPIMPORT to convert the shapefile into a SAS map dataset.

libname geo 'C:\Geography'; /*location of the extracted shapefile*/
 
proc mapimport datafile="C:\Geography\UScounties.shp"
out=geo.shapefile_counties;
run;

Step 3

Add a Region variable to your SAS map dataset. If all you need is one state, you can subset the map dataset to keep just the state you need. For example, I only needed Texas, so I used the State_FIPS variable to subset the map dataset:

proc sql;
create table temp as select
*, 
/*cross-walk counties to regions*/
case
when name='Anderson' then '4'
when name='Andrews' then '9'
when name='Angelina' then '5'
when name='Aransas' then '11',
<……>
when name='Zapata' then '11'
when name='Zavala' then '8'
end as region 
from geo.shapefile_counties
/*subset to Texas*/
where state_fips='48'; 
quit;

Step 4

Use PROC GREMOVE to dissolve the boundaries between counties that belong to the same region. It is important to sort the county dataset by region before you run PROC GREMOVE.

proc sort data=temp;
by region;
run;
 
proc gremove
data=temp
out=geo.regions_shapefile
nodecycle;
by region;
id name; /*name is county name*/
run;

Step 5

To validate that your boundaries resolved correctly, run PROC GMAP to view the regions. If the regions do not look right when you run this step, it may signal an issue with the underlying data. For example, when I ran this with a county shapefile obtained from Census, I found that some of the counties were mislabeled, which of course, caused the regions to not dissolve correctly.

proc gmap map=geo.regions_shapefile data=geo.regions_shapefile all;
   id region;
   choro region / nolegend levels=1;
run;

Here’s the result I got, which is exactly what I expected:

Custom Regional Maps in SAS Visual Analytics

Step 6

Add a sequence number variable to the regions dataset. SAS Visual Analytics 8.2 needs it properly define a custom polygon inside a report:

data geo.regions_shapefile;
set geo.regions_shapefile;
seqno=_n_;
run;

Step 7

Load the new region shapefile in SAS Visual Analytics.

Step 8

In the dataset with the region variable that you want to visualize, create a new geography variable and define a new custom polygon provider.

Geography Variable:

Polygon Provider:

Step 9

Now, you can create a map of your custom regions:

How to create custom regional maps in SAS Visual Analytics 8.2 was published on SAS Users.

1月 262018
 

If you have worked with the different types of score code generated by the high-performance modeling nodes in SAS® Enterprise Miner™ 14.1, you have probably come across the Analytic Store (or ASTORE) file type for scoring.  The ASTOREfile type works very well for scoring complex machine learning models like random forests, gradient boosting, support vector machines and others. In this article, we will focus on ASTORE files generated by SAS® Viya® Visual Data Mining and Machine Learning (VDMML) procedures. An introduction to analytic stores on SAS Viya can be found here.

In this post, we will:

  1. Generate an ASTORE file for a PROC ASTORE in SAS Visual Data Mining and Machine Learning.

Generate an ASTORE file for a gradient boosting model

Our example dataset is a distributed in-memory CAS table that contains information about applicants who were granted credit for a certain home equity loan. The categorical binary-valued target variable ‘BAD’ identifies if a client either defaulted or repaid their loan. The remainder of the variables indicating the candidate’s credit history, debt-to-income ratio, occupation, etc., are used as predictors for the model. In the code below, we are training a gradient boosting model on a randomly sampled 70% of the data and validating against 30% of the data. The statement SAVESTATE creates an analytic store file (ASTORE) for the model and saves it as a binary file named “astore_gb.”

proc gradboost data=PUBLIC.HMEQ;
partition fraction(validate=0.3);
target BAD / level=nominal;
input LOAN MORTDUE DEBTINC VALUE YOJ DEROG DELINQ CLAGE NINQ CLNO /
level=interval;
input REASON JOB / level=nominal;
score out=public.hmeq_scored copyvars=(_all_);
savestate rstore=public.astore_gb;
id _all_;
run;

Shown below are a few observations from the scored dataset hmeq_scored  where YOJ (years at present job) is greater than 10 years.

PROC ASTORE

Override the scoring decision using PROC ASTORE

In this segment, we will use PROC ASTORE to override the scoring decision from the gradient boosting model. To that end, we will first make use of the DESCRIBE statement in PROC ASTORE to produce basic DS2 scoring code using the EPCODE option. We will then edit the score code in DS2 language syntax to override the scoring decision produced from the gradient boosting model.

proc astore;
    describe rstore=public.astore_gb
        epcode="/viyafiles/jukhar/gb_epcode.sas"; run;

A snapshot of the output from the above code statements are shown below. The analytic store is assigned to a unique string identifier. We also get information about the analytic engine that produced the store (gradient boosting, in this case) and the time when the store was created. In addition, though not shown in the snapshot below, we get a list of the input and output variables used.

Let’s take a look at the DS2 score code (“gb_epcode.sas”) produced by the EPCODE option in the DESCRIBE statement within PROC ASTORE.

data sasep.out;
	 dcl package score sc();
	 dcl double "LOAN";
	 dcl double "MORTDUE";
	 dcl double "DEBTINC";
	 dcl double "VALUE";
	 dcl double "YOJ";
	 dcl double "DEROG";
	 dcl double "DELINQ";
	 dcl double "CLAGE";
	 dcl double "NINQ";
	 dcl double "CLNO";
	 dcl nchar(7) "REASON";
	 dcl nchar(7) "JOB";
	 dcl double "BAD";
	 dcl double "P_BAD1" having label n'Predicted: BAD=1';
	 dcl double "P_BAD0" having label n'Predicted: BAD=0';
	 dcl nchar(32) "I_BAD" having label n'Into: BAD';
	 dcl nchar(4) "_WARN_" having label n'Warnings';
	 Keep 
		 "P_BAD1" 
		 "P_BAD0" 
		 "I_BAD" 
		 "_WARN_" 
		 "BAD" 
		 "LOAN" 
		 "MORTDUE" 
		 "VALUE" 
		 "REASON" 
		 "JOB" 
		 "YOJ" 
		 "DEROG" 
		 "DELINQ" 
		 "CLAGE" 
		 "NINQ" 
		 "CLNO" 
		 "DEBTINC" 
		;
	 varlist allvars[_all_];
	 method init();
		 sc.setvars(allvars);
		 sc.setKey(n'F8E7B0B4B71C8F39D679ECDCC70F6C3533C21BD5');
	 end;
	 method preScoreRecord();
	 end;
	 method postScoreRecord();
	 end;
	 method term();
	 end;
	 method run();
		 set sasep.in;
		 preScoreRecord();
		 sc.scoreRecord();
		 postScoreRecord();
	 end;
 enddata;

The sc.setKey in the method init () method block contains a string identifier for the analytic store; this is the same ASTORE identifier that was previously outputted as part of PROC ASTORE. In order to override the scoring decision created from the original gradient boosting model, we will edit the gb_epcode.sas file (shown above) by inserting new statements in the postScoreRecord method block; the edited file must follow DS2 language syntax. For more information about the DS2 language, see 

method postScoreRecord();
      if YOJ>10 then do; I_BAD_NEW='0'; end; else do; I_BAD_NEW=I_BAD; end;
    end;

Because we are saving the outcome into a new variable called “I_BAD_NEW,” we will need to declare this variable upfront along with the rest of the variables in the score file.

In order for this override to take effect, we will need to run the SCORE statement in PROC ASTORE and provide both the original ASTORE file (astore_gb), as well as the edited DS2 score code (gb_epcode.sas).

proc astore;
    score data=public.hmeq epcode="/viyafiles/jukhar/gb_epcode.sas"
          rstore=public.astore_gb
          out=public.hmeq_new; run;

A comparison of “I_BAD” and “I_BAD_NEW” in the output of the above code for select variables shows that the override rule for scoring has indeed taken place.

In this article we explored how to override the scoring decision produced from a machine learning model in SAS Viya. You will find more information about scoring in the Using PROC ASTORE to override scoring decisions in SAS® Viya® was published on SAS Users.

1月 262018
 

If you have worked with the different types of score code generated by the high-performance modeling nodes in SAS® Enterprise Miner™ 14.1, you have probably come across the Analytic Store (or ASTORE) file type for scoring.  The ASTOREfile type works very well for scoring complex machine learning models like random forests, gradient boosting, support vector machines and others. In this article, we will focus on ASTORE files generated by SAS® Viya® Visual Data Mining and Machine Learning (VDMML) procedures. An introduction to analytic stores on SAS Viya can be found here.

In this post, we will:

  1. Generate an ASTORE file for a PROC ASTORE in SAS Visual Data Mining and Machine Learning.

Generate an ASTORE file for a gradient boosting model

Our example dataset is a distributed in-memory CAS table that contains information about applicants who were granted credit for a certain home equity loan. The categorical binary-valued target variable ‘BAD’ identifies if a client either defaulted or repaid their loan. The remainder of the variables indicating the candidate’s credit history, debt-to-income ratio, occupation, etc., are used as predictors for the model. In the code below, we are training a gradient boosting model on a randomly sampled 70% of the data and validating against 30% of the data. The statement SAVESTATE creates an analytic store file (ASTORE) for the model and saves it as a binary file named “astore_gb.”

proc gradboost data=PUBLIC.HMEQ;
partition fraction(validate=0.3);
target BAD / level=nominal;
input LOAN MORTDUE DEBTINC VALUE YOJ DEROG DELINQ CLAGE NINQ CLNO /
level=interval;
input REASON JOB / level=nominal;
score out=public.hmeq_scored copyvars=(_all_);
savestate rstore=public.astore_gb;
id _all_;
run;

Shown below are a few observations from the scored dataset hmeq_scored  where YOJ (years at present job) is greater than 10 years.

PROC ASTORE

Override the scoring decision using PROC ASTORE

In this segment, we will use PROC ASTORE to override the scoring decision from the gradient boosting model. To that end, we will first make use of the DESCRIBE statement in PROC ASTORE to produce basic DS2 scoring code using the EPCODE option. We will then edit the score code in DS2 language syntax to override the scoring decision produced from the gradient boosting model.

proc astore;
    describe rstore=public.astore_gb
        epcode="/viyafiles/jukhar/gb_epcode.sas"; run;

A snapshot of the output from the above code statements are shown below. The analytic store is assigned to a unique string identifier. We also get information about the analytic engine that produced the store (gradient boosting, in this case) and the time when the store was created. In addition, though not shown in the snapshot below, we get a list of the input and output variables used.

Let’s take a look at the DS2 score code (“gb_epcode.sas”) produced by the EPCODE option in the DESCRIBE statement within PROC ASTORE.

data sasep.out;
	 dcl package score sc();
	 dcl double "LOAN";
	 dcl double "MORTDUE";
	 dcl double "DEBTINC";
	 dcl double "VALUE";
	 dcl double "YOJ";
	 dcl double "DEROG";
	 dcl double "DELINQ";
	 dcl double "CLAGE";
	 dcl double "NINQ";
	 dcl double "CLNO";
	 dcl nchar(7) "REASON";
	 dcl nchar(7) "JOB";
	 dcl double "BAD";
	 dcl double "P_BAD1" having label n'Predicted: BAD=1';
	 dcl double "P_BAD0" having label n'Predicted: BAD=0';
	 dcl nchar(32) "I_BAD" having label n'Into: BAD';
	 dcl nchar(4) "_WARN_" having label n'Warnings';
	 Keep 
		 "P_BAD1" 
		 "P_BAD0" 
		 "I_BAD" 
		 "_WARN_" 
		 "BAD" 
		 "LOAN" 
		 "MORTDUE" 
		 "VALUE" 
		 "REASON" 
		 "JOB" 
		 "YOJ" 
		 "DEROG" 
		 "DELINQ" 
		 "CLAGE" 
		 "NINQ" 
		 "CLNO" 
		 "DEBTINC" 
		;
	 varlist allvars[_all_];
	 method init();
		 sc.setvars(allvars);
		 sc.setKey(n'F8E7B0B4B71C8F39D679ECDCC70F6C3533C21BD5');
	 end;
	 method preScoreRecord();
	 end;
	 method postScoreRecord();
	 end;
	 method term();
	 end;
	 method run();
		 set sasep.in;
		 preScoreRecord();
		 sc.scoreRecord();
		 postScoreRecord();
	 end;
 enddata;

The sc.setKey in the method init () method block contains a string identifier for the analytic store; this is the same ASTORE identifier that was previously outputted as part of PROC ASTORE. In order to override the scoring decision created from the original gradient boosting model, we will edit the gb_epcode.sas file (shown above) by inserting new statements in the postScoreRecord method block; the edited file must follow DS2 language syntax. For more information about the DS2 language, see 

method postScoreRecord();
      if YOJ>10 then do; I_BAD_NEW='0'; end; else do; I_BAD_NEW=I_BAD; end;
    end;

Because we are saving the outcome into a new variable called “I_BAD_NEW,” we will need to declare this variable upfront along with the rest of the variables in the score file.

In order for this override to take effect, we will need to run the SCORE statement in PROC ASTORE and provide both the original ASTORE file (astore_gb), as well as the edited DS2 score code (gb_epcode.sas).

proc astore;
    score data=public.hmeq epcode="/viyafiles/jukhar/gb_epcode.sas"
          rstore=public.astore_gb
          out=public.hmeq_new; run;

A comparison of “I_BAD” and “I_BAD_NEW” in the output of the above code for select variables shows that the override rule for scoring has indeed taken place.

In this article we explored how to override the scoring decision produced from a machine learning model in SAS Viya. You will find more information about scoring in the Using PROC ASTORE to override scoring decisions in SAS® Viya® was published on SAS Users.

1月 262018
 

Batch Scripts in SASIf Necessity is the mother of Invention, then, perhaps, the father of Automation is Laziness. Automation is all about convenience, comfort, and productivity. Why do it yourself if you can devise something to do it for you!

In my previous post Running SAS programs in batch under Unix/Linux, we learned that in order to automate SAS jobs submissions, they are often run in batch mode. We also learned that we usually create batch scripts as a convenient way to run SAS programs in batch. To create a unique SAS log file generated with each batch submission, a typical batch script may look like follows:

#!/usr/bin/sh
dtstamp=$(date +%Y.%m.%d_%H.%M.%S)
pgmname="/sas/code/project1/program1.sas"
logname="/sas/code/project1/program1_$dtstamp.log"
/sas/SASHome/SASFoundation/9.4/sas $pgmname -log $logname

It will allow you to submit your SAS program /sas/code/project1/program1.sas in batch, and also capture SAS log file with a convenient date-time suffix in the same directory.

SAS program to write batch scripts

But what if we are deploying multiple SAS programs? Well, then we would need to create a batch script for each of them. They will all look similar to each other, and that is when most human errors usually occur – when we do something similar, monotonously, over and over again.  Besides, I found working with the Unix Visual Editor (“vi editor”) is not quite a 21st century experience.

What would a normal SAS programmer do in such a situation? That’s right – we would write a SAS program to write a batch script file! Let’s do it. Let’s automate the automation.

In its simplest form, to replicate the above batch script example our SAS program would look like this:

filename b '/sas/code/project1/program1.sh';
 
data _null_;
file b;
input;
put _infile_;
datalines;
#!/usr/bin/sh
dtstamp=$(date +%Y.%m.%d_%H.%M.%S)
pgmname="/sas/code/project1/program1.sas"
logname="/sas/code/project1/program1_$dtstamp.log"
/sas/SASHome/SASFoundation/9.4/sas $pgmname -log $logname
;

Setting up batch file permissions

As we already know from my previous post, we need to assign certain permissions to our batch file in order to make it executable. For example, if you want to give yourself (Owner) and Group execution permissions then your script file permissions can be as:

-rwxr-x---, or 750 in octal representation.

In order to do that you can to add to your SAS code the following x-statement:

options noxwait;
x 'chmod 750 /sas/code/project1/program1.sh';

Alternatively, you can use %SYSEXEC macro statement (no quoting for the OS command) or SYSTASK statement, or CALL SYSTEM routine (used within a data step).

When you create a batch script by running the above code in SAS Enterprise Guide (EG), you don’t have to leave the comfort of your SAS environment or even touch Unix vi editor. Moreover, you can even submit your SAS job in batch mode right from your SAS EG Program Editor.

However, all of these will work fine, unless XCMD System Option is disabled (NOXCMD).

Assigning batch file permissions when XCMD System Option is disabled

ERROR: Shell escape is not valid in this SAS session.

Bummer! Have you ever seen this error message in SAS Enterprise Guide while trying to run SAS code with the X statement? It indicates that executing OS commands in the SAS environment is not allowed.

In many organizations, IT department policies do not allow enabling the SAS XCMD system option due to cyber-security concerns. This is usually done system-wide for the whole SAS Enterprise client-server installation via SAS configuration.  In this case, no operating system command is allowed to be executed from within SAS.

Of course, this substantially limits SAS’ automation power, but that is the goal and the price to pay for enhanced security.

Still, even without OS command execution at our disposal, we can set Unix script file permissions using FILENAME statement’s PERMISSION= option. Then our above filename statement will look like this:

filename b '/sas/code/project1/program1.sh'
   permission='A::u::rwx,A::g::r-x,A::o::---';

However, it is important to realize that your ability to fully control file permissions via FILENAME statement’s PERMISSION= option is still restricted by the Unix umask value set by your IT system administrator. But usually, it is not overly restrictive, at least for the purpose of creating executable files in the environments I have worked with.

The double benefit of the FILENAME statement’s PERMISSION= option is that it can be used for setting up file permissions in any SAS installation whether the XCMD system option is enabled or disabled.

SAS macro to create batch script files

Let’s wrap all the above SAS code pieces into a SAS macro that writes batch scripts. Here is the macro code definition:

%macro write_shell(code);
   %let fdir = %substr(&code,1,%sysfunc(findc(&code,/,b)));
 
   options dlcreatedir;
   libname _flib "&fdir";
   libname _flib;
 
   %let core = %substr(&code,1,%eval(%length(&code)-4));
   filename _fout "&core..sh" permission='A::u::rwx,A::g::r-x,A::o::---'; 
   data _null_;
      file _fout;
      put
         '#!/bin/sh' //
         'now=$(date +%Y.%m.%d_%H.%M.%S)' /
         "pgmname=""&code""" /
         "logname=""&core._$now.log""" /
         'sas $pgmname -log $logname'
         ;
   run;
   filename _fout;
%mend write_shell;

The single macro parameter (code) represents full path name of your SAS code. And here is a macro invocation example:

 
%write_shell(/sas/code/project1/program1.sas)

The assumption here is that the script file gets created in the same directory as the relevant SAS code and SAS logs for each of the batch runs. It will be assigned the same name as your SAS program, only with the .sh name extension. As you can see, we do some string parsing to derive directory name, script file name and SAS log file name from the single macro parameter representing full path name of your SAS code. As an added bonus, if a specified directory (/sas/code/project1/) does not yet exist, it will be created by this macro. DLCREATEDIR System Option (along with the two subsequent libname statements) are responsible for the directory creation.

If you want to create many script files for your multiple SAS programs, you just invoke the macro as many times. You can even go totally data-driven for mass script file creation.

Do you find this useful?

Please let me know in the comments section below if you find this blog post useful. Thank you for reading! I also invite you to share your ideas and experiences on the topic.

Let SAS write batch scripts for you was published on SAS Users.