tips & tricks

2月 272019
 

In this post, we continue our discussion of geography variables, the foundation of Visual Analytics Geo maps. This time we will look at Custom Coordinates.  As with any statistical graph, understanding your data is key.  But when using Custom Coordinates for geographic maps, this understanding becomes even more important.

Use the Custom Coordinate geography variable when your data does not match one of VA’s predefined geography types (see previous post, Fundamentals of SAS Visual Analytics geo maps).  For Custom coordinates, your data set must include latitude and longitude values as separate variables.   These values should be sourced from trustworthy providers and validated for accuracy prior to loading into VA.

When using Custom Coordinates, the Coordinate Space must also be considered.  The coordinate space defines the grid used to plot your data.  The underlying map is also based on a grid.  In order for your data to display correctly on a map, these grids must match.  Visual Analytics uses the World Geodetic System (WGS84) as the default coordinate space (grid).  This will work for most scenarios, including the example below.

Once you have selected a dataset and confirmed it contains the required spatial information, you can now create a Custom Geography variable.  In this example, I am using the variable Business Address from the dataset Wake_Co_Pizza.  Let’s get started.

  1. Begin by opening VA and navigate to the Data panel on the left of the application.
  2. Select the dataset and locate the variable that you wish to map. Click the down arrow to the right of the variable and chose ‘Geography’ from the Classification dropdown menu.
  3. The ‘Edit Geography Item’ window appears. Select Custom coordinates in the ‘Geography data type’ dropdown.   Three new dropdown lists appear that are specific to the Custom coordinates data type: ‘Latitude (y)’, ‘Longitude (x)’ and ‘Coordinate Space’.

When using the Custom coordinates data type, we must tell VA where to find the spatial data in our dataset.  We do this using the Latitude (y) and Longitude (x) dropdown lists.  They contain all measures from your dataset.  In this example, the variable ‘Latitude World Geodetic System’ contains our latitude values and the variable  ‘Longitude World Geodetic System’ contains our longitude values.   The ‘Coordinate Space’ dropdown defaults to World Geodetic System (WGS84) and is the correct choice for this example.

  1. Click the OK button to complete the setup once the latitude and longitude variables have been selected from their respective dropdown lists. You should see a new ‘Geography’ section in the Data panel.  The name of the variable (or its edited value) will be displayed beside a globe icon to indicate it is a geography variable.  In this case we see the variable Business Address.

 

Congratulations!  You have now created a custom geography variable and are ready to display it on a map.  To do this, simply drag it from the Data panel and drop it on the report canvas.  The auto-map feature of VA will recognize it as a geography variable and display the data as a bubble map with an OpenStreetMap background.

In this post, we created a custom geography variable using the default Coordinate Space.  Using a custom geography variable gives you the flexibility of mapping data sets that contain valid latitude and longitude values.  Next time, we will take our exploration of the geography variable one step further and explore using custom polygons in your maps.

Using Custom Coordinates for map creation in SAS Visual Analytics was published on SAS Users.

2月 082019
 

Creating a map with SAS Visual Analytics begins with the geographic variable.  The geographic variable is a special type of data variable where each item has a latitude and longitude value.  For maximum flexibility, VA supports three types of geography variables:

  1. Predefined
  2. Custom coordinates
  3. Custom polygons

This is the first in a series of posts that will discuss each type of geography variable and their creation. The predefined geography variable is the easiest and quickest way to begin and will be the focus of this post.

SAS Visual Analytics comes with nine (9) predefined geographic lookup types.  This lookup method requires that your data contains a variable matching one of these nine data types:

  • Country or Region Names – Full proper name of a country or region (ISO 3166-1)
  • Country or Region ISO 2-Letter Codes – Alpha-2 country code (ISO 3166-1)
  • Country or Region ISO Numeric Codes – Numeric-3 country code (ISO 3166-1)
  • Country or Region SAS Map ID Values – SAS ID values from MPASGFK continent data sets
  • Subdivision (State, Province) Names – Full proper name for level 2 admin regions (ISO 3166-2)
  • Subdivision (State, Province) SAS Map ID Values – SAS ID values from MAPSGFK continent data sets (Level 1)
  • US State Names – Full proper name for US State
  • US State Abbreviations – Two letter US State abbreviation
  • US Zip Codes – A 5-digit US zip code (no regions)

Once you have identified a variable in your dataset matching one of these types, you are ready to begin.  For our example map, the dataset 'Crime' and variable 'State name' will be used.  Let’s get started.

Creating a predefined geography variable in SAS Visual Analytics

  1. Begin by opening VA and navigate to the Data panel on the left of the application.
  2. Select the desired dataset and locate a variable that matches one of the predefined lookup types discussed above. Click the down arrow to the right of the variable and select ‘Geography’ from the Classification dropdown menu.
  3. The ‘Edit Geography Item’ window will open. Depending upon the type of geography variable selected, some of the options on this dialog will vary.  The 'Name' textbox is common for all types and will contain the variable selected from your dataset.  Edit this label as needed to make it more user friendly for your intended audience.
  4. The ‘Geography data type’ drop down list is where you select the desired type of geography variable.  In this example, we are using the default predefined option.
  5. Locate the 'Name or code context' dropdown list.  Select the type of predefined variable that matches the data type of the variable chosen from your data.  Once selected, VA scans your data and does an internal lookup on each data item.  This process identifies latitude and longitude values for each item of your dataset.  Lookup results are shown on the right of the window as a percentage and a thumbnail size map.  The thumbnail map displays the the first 100 matches.
  6. If there are any unmatched data items, the first 5 will be displayed.  This may provide a better understanding of your data.  In this example, it is clear from variable name as to what type should be selected (US State Names).  However, in most cases that choice will not be this obvious.  The lesson here, know your data!

Unmatched data items indicators

Once you are satisfied with the matched results, click the OK button to continue.  You should see a new section in the Data panel labeled ‘Geography’.  The name of the variable will be displayed beside a globe icon. This icon represents the geography variable and provides confirmation it was created successfully.

Icon change for geography variable

Now that the geography variable has been created, we are ready to create a map.  To do this, simply drag it from the Data panel and drop it on the VA report canvas.  The auto-map feature of VA will recognize the geography variable and create a bubble map with an OpenStreetMap background.  Congratulations!  You have just created your first map in VA.

Bubble map created with predefined geography variable

The concept of a geography variable was introduced in this post as the foundation for creating all maps in VA.  Using the predefined geography variable is the quickest way to get started with Geo maps.  In situations when the predefined type is not possible, using one of VA's custom geography types becomes necessary.  These scenarios will be discussed in future blog posts.

Fundamentals of SAS Visual Analytics geo maps was published on SAS Users.

11月 072017
 

SAS Tips and TricksThere is certainly no shortage of terrific tips and tricks in various SAS blogs from some of our most distinguished SAS in-house experts. But, there's another group of equally qualified experts who don't often get to share their expertise on this channel: our customers. So, I went on a quest to get the inside scoop from various SAS users, polling Friends of SAS members to get their feedback on their favorite SAS tips.

We asked a few of these Friends of SAS members who are regular SAS users to share with us their top SAS tips and tricks for improving performance or something they wished they had known earlier in their SAS career. Based on that, we got a wide range of tips and tricks from a number of different SAS users – ranging from novice to expert and across various industries and product users. Check out some of them below:

FUNCTIONS

Functions are either built into SAS itself or you can write your own customized code that act in the same manner, all of which help in analyzing and processing data. There are a variety of function categories that include mathematical, date and time, character, truncation, and miscellaneous. Using functions makes us more efficient, and we don’t have to re-invent the wheel every time we want to figure something out. With this being said, some of our regular SAS users have a thing or two to say about dealing with functions that may help you out:

“Before you program any complex code, look for a SAS function that will do the task for you.”
     - John Ladds, Past President, OASUS

“Insert a line break in a concatenated string, such as: manylines = catx('0a'x,a,b,c);”
     - Aroop Ghosh, Principal Consultant, Webtalk Communications

“Use the lag function to create time related variables, for example, in time punch data”
     - Yolanda, Analyst, TD

“A good trick that I have recently learnt [sic]which can make the code less wordier is using the functions IFN and IFC as an alternative to IF THEN ELSE statements in conditional processing.”
     - Sunny Giroti, Master of Business Analytics Candidate, Schulich School of Business

“IFN can be used in place of IF THEN ELSE to shorten code”
     - Neil Menezes, Senior Business Anlyst, CTFS

“Ron Cody’s link from SAS.COM. It has many SAS function examples.”
     - John Lam, CIBC

SYNTAX/SHORTCUTS/EFFICIENCIES

You know what they say: time is money. So for a SAS programmer, finding shortcuts and ways to work more efficiently and faster are important to get a job done quicker. Here are a few ways SAS users think can make your life easy while working with SAS:

“Use missover to ensure no records are skipped when reading in a file”
     - Scott Bellefeuille, IT Solutions Developer (Merchant Services), TD Bank

“Pressing keys 'Ctrl'+'/' to comment out a line of code.”
     - Bunce Leung, Execution Manager, RBC

“Variable Lists - being able to refer to variables using double dashes to indicate all variables between first and last in a dataset is super useful for many procs. The later versions of being able to use the prefix and colon to indicate all datasets with a prefix is a great shortcut as well.”
     - Fareeza Khurshed, Manager (Statistical Services), Alberta Treasury Board and Finance

“I like to use PERL in SAS for finding stuff in character variables.”
     - Peter Timusk, Statistics Officer, Statistics Canada

“Title "SAS can give you an Inheritance". Have an ODBC driver on your local PC but not on a remote server? No problem. Use rsubmit with the inheritlib option. Your remote server will now inherit the ODBC driver and be able to access a database you thought you could only reach with your PC.”
     - Horst Wolter, Manager, TD Bank

“If you want to speed the processing of your program. Run your join statements on the "work" library. It is must faster.”
     - Estela Tavares, Economist, Statistics Canada

“When dealing with probability, can logistic be used in all cases? Trick Q - as A is N0. What about the times, probability is 0 and 1. What if the data is heavily distributed on 1s and 0s.”
     - Mukul Pandey, Student Business Analytics, Schulich School of Business

“Proc tabulate can perform descriptive statistics better than proc freq and proc means.”
     - Taha Azizi, Senior Business Insight Analyst, TD

Your turn

Were any of these tips and tricks useful? Do you use them already? What are some of your top SAS tips and tricks? Please be sure to share in the comments below!

Looking for more tips and tricks? Check out this video featuring six Canadian SAS programmers, including a few Friends of SAS members, who share some of their favourite SAS programming tips.

About Friends of SAS

If you’re not familiar with Friends of SAS, it is an exclusive online community available only to our Canadian SAS customers and partners to recognize and show our appreciation for their affinity to SAS. Members complete activities called 'challenges' and earn points that can be redeemed for rewards. There are opportunities to build powerful connections, gain privileged access to SAS resources and events, and boost your learning and development of SAS all in a fun environment.

Interested in learning more about Friends of SAS? Feel free to email myself at Natasha.Ulanowski@sas.com or Martha.Casanova@sas.com with any questions or more details.

SAS tips and tricks: Users-tell-all edition was published on SAS Users.