video

6月 282012
 
Live Mastering JMP Webcasts Each quarter, JMP systems engineers present 11 Mastering JMP live webcasts that are intended to help users develop and expand their JMP skills. We recently added new dates (through December 2012) for our Mastering JMP webcasts. The new list includes September and December dates for Making [...]
2月 232012
 
New demos from live Mastering JMP webcasts are now available for viewing at your leisure. I divided each webcast into two or three videos. Registration is required to view the videos. Here's a hint: After you register, bookmark the page from which you launched the videos so that you can [...]
8月 262011
 

I'm pleased to share a new installment of our “Nuts & Bolts of Social Media” video series. In this video, SAS’ Deb Orton talks with Charlotte Sibley, of Sibley Associates, about how engaging in social media can benefit the life science industry with regards to better patient outcomes and return on investment.

The topics discussed include:

  • The FDA's regulations
  • Company to patient communications
  • Patient to patient  communications
  • Physician to physician communications
  • Learning from other industries
  • And more

Enjoy the video!

 

 

tags: Life Sciences, nuts & bolts, social media, video
6月 142011
 
This is the year of the Marketer. We are emerging as leaders in business due to our unique blend of abilities to gain insights from market and customer data and our keen interest in people. We are active in Social Media and Karl Gustafson reminds us in Elevating The Role Of The Marketing Leader that we have grown up understanding the need for influence vs. authority.

When the year commenced, I took a renewed interest in the study of leadership, reading several books and blogs; attending coursework; and actively mentoring some of our future leaders. My particular interests are:

  • What makes leaders great
  • How to develop leaders in our organization
  • What can I do to become a better leader

My co-worker, Justin Huntsman and I take every opportunity we can to speak with business and government leaders on the topic of Social Media. During our recent Health and Life Sciences conference (see Enter The Center for Health Analytics and Insights for a great write-up of the event), we spent time discussing the topic of Social Media in the Life Sciences industry with a few industry experts, including Charlotte Sibley.

Charlotte is best known for her 30+ years in Market Research and the use of Analytics in Life Sciences. As I researched her background for a Nuts and Bolts of Social Media video, I noticed a role she held at Shire Pharmaceuticals, SVP of Leadership Development. I couldn’t resist the opportunity to ask Charlotte about this role and her opinions about identifying and developing leaders.

Charlotte told me that she was looking for leaders who: Take accountability, have excellent communication skills, and focus on teamwork and collaboration. Her advice to future leaders?

  1. Do your current job very well
  2. Get a mentor
  3. Adopt the attitude of a career “lattice” vs a ladder

Please take a few minutes to listen to the thoughts of Charlotte Sibley, of Sibley and Associates.


7月 222010
 
Our “Nuts & Bolts of Social Media” video series carries on with a new interview between SAS’ Deb Orton and Gary King, CIO of national clothing retailer Chico’s.

Gary begins with a brief story of how Chico’s started as a small store selling folk art (Really? Yes, really.), before transforming into an apparel company with three brands (Chico's, White House | Black Market and Soma Intimates) and 1,100 stores across the US and Puerto Rico.

Gary goes on to discuss the demographics of their brands, and the challenges of a constantly changing marketplace.

“The advent of the Internet,” Gary says, “was a huge shift in the way people shopped. We spend a lot of time now browsing before we buy, and that has radically changed the concept of shopping.” The good part, for Chico’s anyway, is customers still want to touch and feel clothing – which makes Chico’s in-store experience tremendously important.

But don’t think Chico’s ignores the Internet or Social media.

On the contrary, Social media is a huge focus. All three brands are on Facebook, and have been for years.

Gary related one successful project, where their intimate apparel brand Soma hosted a four-hour Facebook pajama party where fans could “celebrate and share their thoughts about their favorite pajamas, movies, stories and recipes, as well as participate in personality quizzes and surveys and chat with Soma Intimates style experts.”

In another example, the White House | Black Market brand president incentivized people to participate in a “what color underwear are you wearing” survey on Facebook by giving away a gift card and shopping spree.

Deb and Gary went on to discuss who should ‘own’ Social media organizationally (“everyone” says Gary), what the future of Social media looks like (social media will evolve in the same way fashion does), what Social media IT implications there are (many).

Before closing, Gary offers two practical Social media tips:

  1. Embrace the Social media space. From an IT standpoint don’t keep it out, bring it in. And,
  2. Find the champions inside your organization who are the conduits to the Social media space. Partner with them to support, enable, and create the mechanisms by which they can be more effective.

Enjoy the video!

7月 012010
 
We’re pleased to offer another segment of “The Nuts & Bolts of Social Media,” this time with my esteemed colleague, Justin Huntsman. In this short video, Deb talks to Justin about how he’s integrating social media into his campaigns. During the discussion, Justin provides some great ideas about how to ease social media “onto your docket” and balance traditional marketing with social media marketing.

Some of the most interesting points come from the idea that they key to balancing traditional and social marketing activities is to establish your goals before you start. Related points include:

  • As you engage in both traditional and social marketing, if you begin with a goal, you’ll find your efforts align themselves automatically.
  • If you don’t begin with a goal, you likely will be making tradeoffs that in retrospect will end up costing you more than you imagined.

Integrating and balancing traditional and social marketing efforts is critical for marketers to be successful today. Justin offers an effective way to approach it by getting yourself to stop thinking of the two worlds as independent responsibilities, and also to think of social media as a means and not an end.

Click on the screen below to tune in – it’s a short interview packed with some good insights.

6月 152010
 
“The Nuts & Bolts of Social Media,” is the title of the series of video interview segments we're producing, beginning with the Chris Brogan interviews, and continuing on with some of our internal social media champions, and when possible, with customers. Look for future posts tagged "The Nuts and Bolts of Social Media."

Here is Deb Orton's discussion with Dave Thomas, the Social Media Manager at SAS, providing us with a behind-the-scenes look at how SAS has prepared for engaging in social media. What came out of this candid discussion is a good list of suggestions for companies looking for a starting point to engage in social media.

There are many great points that Dave makes, but here are the three that stood out for me:

  1. Set up a listening apparatus. The idea here is to hear what people are already saying before you start putting out your own messages. Yes, this may seem very basic, but it’s easy to forget and fundamentally important because it serves to remind that listening is as important as talking in social media and even in face-to-face communications.

  2. Keep in mind what’s important to your business. Again, this may seem basic, but for that reason it may be easy to lose sight of. Engaging in social media should complement your existing means of communicating, and should not be undertaken as a stand-alone effort. Work it in to your existing marketing / communications strategy and your existing goals and objectives.

  3. Develop policies and guidelines for social media engagement. To develop them, engage a broad cross-section of departments in your company that includes both evangelists and skeptics so people in both camps can learn from each other. Make it a point to involve both H.R. and legal early in the process because they often can see hazards in situations that others cannot. Be sure the policies and guidelines are short, useful and practical, with plenty of both “Dos” and “Don’ts.”

Grab a pen and be ready to hit the pause button often because there are many good tips in this segment. My favorite quote is this: If you don't have a written policy in place, you have a de facto policy that says "do what you want."



6月 072010
 
A few weeks ago I posted 'Chris Brogan Talks About the Value and Measurement of Social Media', the fifth (of six) Chris Brogan videos taped when Chris was at our headquarters in Cary, NC.

In this video, the sixth and final segment in the series, SAS' Deb Orton interviews Chris Brogan of New Marketing Labs. Chris discusses how being a "Trust Agent" applies to corporate marketers. His advice? Don’t abuse your prospects! find ways to show you care outside of the sale.

Enjoy the video. And stay tuned. Soon we'll continue this 'Nuts and Bolts' series with new interviews from SAS marketing practitioners.



5月 252010
 
A few weeks ago I posted 'Chris Brogan Talks About Making Social Media Happen in Your Company', the fourth (of six) Chris Brogan videos taped when Chris was at our headquarters in Cary, NC.

In this video, the fifth in this series, SAS' Deb Orton interviews Chris Brogan of New Marketing Labs. Chris, channeling his ‘stunt double’ Katie Paine, discusses how to measure social media effectiveness and how to set objectives for using social media in marketing.

Enjoy the video. And stay tuned. We'll post the final segment from this interview series soon, and we'll continue this series with new interviews from SAS practitioners in the coming months.