172017
 

Editor's note: Charyn Faenza co-authored this blog. Learn more about Charyn.

As the fun of the festive season ends, the buzz of the new year and the enchantment of SAS Global Forum 2017 begins. SAS Global Forum is a conference designed by SAS users, for SAS users, bringing together SAS professionals from all over the world to learn, collaborate and network in person. Sure, online communication is great, but it’s hard to beat the thrill of meeting fellow SAS users face-to-face for the first time. It feels like magic! To help you prepare for the event, Charyn and I wanted to share a few things including information on metadata security. Read on for more.

Start your SAS Global Forum journey now!

SUGAWant to stay up to date with SAS Global Forum activities, and get a head start on your conference networking? Join the SAS Global Forum 2017 online community. Here you can post questions, share ideas, and connect with others before the event. While you are at it, the SAS User Group for Administrators (SUGA) community also feels magical for me.  As part of the committee, we regularly get together (virtually!) to discuss and plan exciting events on behalf of SAS administrators around the world.  Join the SUGA community and watch for upcoming events, including a live meet-up at SAS Global Forum! That event is scheduled for Monday, April 3, from 6:30-8:00 p.m.

Security auditing

During his workshop at SAS Global Forum 2014, Gregory Nelson pointed out that the SAS administrator role has evolved over the years, and so has one of their key responsibilities: security auditing. Once you’ve set up an initial security plan, how do you ensure that the environment remains secure? Can you just “set it and forget it?” Probably not. Especially if you want to ensure regulatory compliance, to maintain business confidence and keep your SAS platform in line with its design specifications as your business grows and your SAS environment evolves.

Thinking about your own SAS platform:

  • What would happen in your organization if someone accessed data they shouldn’t?
  • When was your last SAS platform security project?
  • When was it last tested? How extensive was it? How long did it take?
  • Have there been any changes since it was last tested? Whether they are deliberate, accidental, expected or unexpected.
  • How do you know if it’s still secure today?

Presenting at SAS Global Forum

If security is important to you and your organization, please join us at this year’s magical SAS Global Forum, as I co-present with Charyn Faenza on SAS® Metadata Security 301: Auditing Your SAS Environment. Hold your horses… “301?,” Did I hear that right? “What about 101 and 201?" Glad your curious mind asked... At the last two SAS GLOBAL FORUM events, Charyn has presented SAS Metadata Security 101 and 201 papers that step through the fundamentals on authentication and authorization. Check them out at:

Our upcoming 301 paper will focus on auditing to complete the three ‘A’s (Authentication, Authorization and Auditing), including how you can use Metacoda software to regularly review your environment, so you can protect your resources, comply with security auditing requirements, and quickly and easily answer the question "Who has access to what?"

Here are the details for our paper:
Session Title: 786 -  SAS Metadata Security 301: Auditing your SAS Environment
Type: Breakout
Date: Tuesday, April 4
Time: 4:00 PM - 5:00 PM
Location: Dolphin, Dolphin Level III - Asia 4

Our security journey

sas-security-journey

Whether you’re a new SAS administrator or an experienced one, you’ll know that security is a journey rather than a destination.

To help make sure you’re on the right path, check out the SUGA virtual events, SAS administrator tagged blog posts, Twitter #sasadmin and platformadmin.com.

sas-security-journey02If you’d like to chat more about SAS security auditing, please comment below, join our chat in the SAS Global Forum community, or connect with us on Twitter at @HomesAtMetacoda, @CharynFaenza.

Looking forward to seeing you in April at SAS Global Forum 2017 in the enchanting and magical Walt Disney World Swan and Dolphin Resort, Orlando, Florida!


About Charyn Faenza

charynMs. Faenza is Vice President and Manager of Corporate Business Intelligence Systems for First National Bank, the largest subsidiary of F.N.B. Corporation (NYSE: FNB). An accountant by training, she is passionate about not only understanding the technology, but the underlying business utility of the systems her team supports. In her role she is responsible for the architecture and development of F.N.B.’s corporate profitability, stress testing, and analytics platforms and oversees the data collection and governance functions to ensure high data quality, proper data storage and transfer, risk management and data compliance.

Throughout her tenure at F.N.B. her experience in data integration and governance has been leveraged in several cross functional projects where she has been engaged as a strategic consultant regarding the design of systems and processes in the Finance, Treasury and Credit areas of the Bank.

Ms. Faenza earned her bachelor’s degree in Accounting from Youngstown State University where she is currently serving on the Business Advisory Board of the Youngstown State University Laricccia School of Accounting and Finance.

tags: papers & presentations, SAS Administrators, SAS Global Forum, SAS User Group for Administrators

Take a SAS security journey at SAS Global Forum 2017 was published on SAS Users.

172017
 

For many years, the Toyota Prius was the hybrid with the best mpg - but in 2017 that's changing! Let's examine the data ... For analyses like this, I have found the fueleconomy.gov website to be a wonderful source of information. In recent years, they've even made all their data […]

The post Prius isn't the highest-mpg hybrid in 2017! appeared first on SAS Learning Post.

162017
 

For SAS programmers, the PUT statement in the DATA step and the %PUT macro statement are useful statements that enable you to display the values of variables and macro variables, respectively. By default, the output appears in the SAS log. This article shares a few tips that help you to use these statements more effectively.

Tip 1: Display the name and value of a variable

The PUT statement supports a "named output" syntax that enables you to easily display a variable name and value. The trick is to put an equal sign immediately after the name of a variable: PUT varname=; For example, the following statement displays the text "z=" followed by the value of z:

data _null_;
x = 9.1; y = 6; z = sqrt(x**2 + y**2);
put z=;           /* display variable and value */
run;
z=10.9

Tip 2: Display values of arrays

You can extend the previous tip to arrays and to sets of variables. The PUT statement enables you to display elements of an array (or multiple variables) by specifying the array name in parentheses, followed by an equal sign in parentheses, as follows:

data _null_;
array x[5];
do k = 1 to dim(x);
   x[k] = k**2;
end;
put (x[*]) (=);     /* put each element of array on separate lines */
put (x1 x3 x5) (=); /* put each variable/value on separate lines */
run;
x1=1 x2=4 x3=9 x4=16 x5=25
x1=1 x3=9 x5=25

This syntax is not supported for _TEMPORARY_ arrays. However, as a workaraoun, you can use the CATQ function to concatenate array values into a character variable, as follows:

temp = catq('d', ',', of x[*]);         /* x can be _TEMPORARY_ array */
put temp=;

Incidentally, if you ever want to apply a format to the values, the format name goes inside the second set of parentheses, after the equal sign: put (x1 x3 x5) (=6.2);

Tip 3: Display values on separate lines

The previous tip displayed all values on a single line. Sometimes it is useful to display each value on its own line. To do that, put a slash after the equal sign, as follows:

...
put (x[*]) (=/);                   /* put each element on separate lines */
...
x1=1
x2=4
x3=9
x4=16
x5=25

Tip 4: Display all name-value pairs

You can display all values of all variables by using the _ALL_ keyword, as follows:

data _null_;
x = 9.1; y = 6; z = sqrt(x**2 + y**2);
A = "SAS"; B = "Statistics";
put _ALL_;              /* display all variables and values */
run;
x=9.1 y=6 z=10.9 A=SAS B=Statistics _ERROR_=0 _N_=1

Notice that in addition to the user-defined variables, the _ALL_ keyword also prints the values of two automatic variables named _ERROR_ and _N_.

Tip 5: Display the name and value of a macro variable

Just as the PUT statement displays the value of an ordinary variable, you can use the %PUT statement to display the value of a macro variable. If you use the special "&=" syntax, SAS will display the name and value of a macro variable. For example, to display your SAS version, you can display the value of the SYSVLONG automatic system macro variable, as follows:

%put &=SYSVLONG;
SYSVLONG=9.04.01M4P110916

The results above are for my system, which is running SAS 9.4M4. Your SAS version might be different.

Tip 6: Display all name-value pairs for macros

You can display the name and value of all user-defined macros by using the _USER_ keyword. You can display the values of all SAS automatic system macros by using the _AUTOMATIC_ keyword.

%let N = 50;
%let NumSamples = 1e4;
%put _USER_;
GLOBAL N 50
GLOBAL NUMSAMPLES 1e4

Conclusion and References

There you have it: six tips to make it easier to display the value of SAS variables and macro variables. Thanks to Jiangtang Hu who pointed out the %PUT &=var syntax in his blog in 2012. For additional features of the PUT and %PUT statements, see:

tags: SAS Programming, Tips and Techniques

The post PUT it there! Six tips for using PUT and %PUT statements in SAS appeared first on The DO Loop.

162017
 

In the word of digital marketing, one of the more controversial moves I’ve seen recently was from U.K. car insurer Admiral. The company recently announced that it would begin offering car insurance discounts to less risky customers based on voluntarily provided social media data. The insurer would analyze Facebook likes […]

Digital footprints in the sand … a source of rich behavioural data was published on SAS Voices.