3月 232017
 

If you're a fan of SAS' ODS Graphics, you probably know that it does pretty much everything except geographical maps. But it's flexible enough that you can "fake it 'till you make it"! This example describes how to fake a geographical (choropleth) heat map using Proc SGplot polygons. In my [...]

The post Bringing the heat! - Creating heat maps with proc sgplot ... appeared first on SAS Learning Post.

3月 232017
 

The new government’s vision of Brexit is to make the UK a more international, more outward looking nation. One whose future success and status in on the world stage will be dictated by the ability to attract investment and finance, and to drive trade with existing and new partners. Yet [...]

Supporting the vision of a more global post-Brexit Britain was published on SAS Voices by Peter Snelling

3月 232017
 

The second round of the 2017 NCAA Men’s Basketball Tournament was an interesting one. Eight-seeded Wisconsin took out the reigning champion Wildcats, despite pundit predictions that Villanova could go all the way again. South Carolina, 24-10 in the SEC during the regular season, upset perennial favorite Duke by seven points. [...]

Make an accurate prediction without watching a single basketball game was published on SAS Voices by Ashley Binder

3月 222017
 

Editor's note: The following post is from Scott Leslie, PhD, Manager of Advanced Analytics for MedImpact Healthcare Systems, Inc. Scott will be one of the Code Doctors at SAS Global Forum 2017.

Learn more about Scott.

VISIT THE CODE CLINIC AT SASGF 2017

$0 copay, no deductible.  No waiting rooms, no outdated magazines. What kind of doctor’s office is this? While we might not be able to help with that nasty cough, SAS Code Doctors are here to help – when it comes to your SAS code, that is.

Yes, the Code Doctors return to SAS Global Forum 2017! This year the Code Clinic will have over 20 SAS experts on-call to answer your questions on syntax, SAS Solutions, best practices and concepts across a broad range of SAS topics/applications, including Base SAS, macros, report writing, ODS, SQL, SAS Enterprise Guide, statistics, and more. It’s a fantastic opportunity to review code, ask questions, develop and brainstorm with peers who have decades of experience using SAS. Bring your code on paper, a flash drive, or a laptop. We’ll have 3-4 laptops with several versions of SAS software installed: 9.1.3 to 9.4 and EG 4.1 to 7.1. And if we can’t answer your coding question at the clinic, we can easily refer you to a specialist, namely the SAS R&D section of the Quad.

So, take advantage of this personalized learning experience in the Lower Quad area of the conference. Clinic office hours are:

  • Monday 4/3, 10:00 am - 3:30 pm
  • Tuesday 4/3, 9:30 am – 2:00 pm and 3:30 pm – 6:00 pm

Here’s the detailed schedule of our all-star code doctor lineup. If you haven’t heard of these names yet, you have now...

/*Just by reading this blog…*/.

 

About Scott Leslie

Scott Leslie, PhD, is Manager of Advanced Analytics for MedImpact Healthcare Systems, Inc. with over15 years of SAS® experience in the pharmacy benefits and medical management field. His SAS knowledge areas include SAS/STAT, Enterprise Guide, and Visual Analytics. Scott presents at local, regional and international SAS user group conferences as well at various clinical and scientific conferences. He is a former executive committee member of the Western Users of SAS Software (WUSS) and contributes to the San Diego SAS Users’ Group (SANDS).

Visit the code clinic at SAS Global Forum was published on SAS Users.

3月 222017
 

Prior to SAS/IML 14.2, every variable in the Interactive Matrix Language (IML) represented a matrix. That changed when SAS/IML 14.2 introduced two new data structures: data tables and lists. This article gives an overview of data tables. I will blog about lists in a separate article.

A matrix is a rectangular array that contains all numerical or all character values. Numerical matrices are incredibly useful for computations because linear algebra provides a powerful set of tools for implementing analytical algorithms. However, a matrix is somewhat limiting as a data structure. Matrices are two-dimensional, rectangular, and cannot contain mixed-type data (numeric AND character). Consequently, you can't use one single matrix to pass numeric and character data to a function.

Data tables in SAS/IML are in-memory versions of a data set. They contain columns that can be numeric or character, as well as column attributes such as names, formats, and labels. The data table is associated with a single symbol and can be passed to modules or returned from a module. the TableCreateFromDataSet function, as shown:

proc iml;
tClass = TableCreateFromDataSet("Sashelp", "Class"); /* SAS/IML 14.2 */

The function reads the data from the Sashelp.Class data set and creates an in-memory copy. You can use the tClass symbol to access properties of the table. For example, if you want to obtain the names of the columns in the table, you can use

varNames = TableGetVarName(tClass);
print varNames;
Column names for a data table in SAS/IML

Extracting columns and adding new columns

Data tables are not matrices. You cannot add, subtract, or multiply with tables. When you want to compute something, you need to extract the data into matrices. For example, if you want to compute the body-mass index (BMI) of the students in Sashelp.Class, you can use the TableAddVar function to add the BMI as a new column in the table:

Y = TableGetVarData(tClass, {"Weight" "Height"});
wt = Y[,1]; ht = Y[,2];                /* get Height and Weight variables */
BMI = wt / ht##2 * 703;                /* BMI formula */
call TableAddVar(tClass, "BMI", BMI);  /* add new "BMI" column to table */

Passing data tables to modules

As indicated earlier, you can use data tables to pass mixed-type data into a user-defined function. For example, the following statements define a module whose argument is a data table. The module prints the mean value of the numeric columns in the table, and it prints the number of unique levels for character columns. To do so, it first extracts the numeric data into a matrix, then later extracts the character data into a matrix.

start QuickSummary(tbl);
   type = TableIsVarNumeric(tbl);      /* 0/1 vector   */
   /* for numeric columns, print mean */
   idx = loc(type=1);                  /* numeric cols */
   if ncol(idx)>0 then do;             /* there is a numeric col */
      varNames = TableGetVarName(tbl, idx);         /* get names */
      m = TableGetVarData(tbl, idx);   /* extract numeric data   */
      mean = mean(m);
      print mean[colname=varNames L="Mean of Numeric Variables"];
   end;
   /* for character columns, print number of levels */
   idx = loc(type=0);                  /* character cols */
   if ncol(idx)>0 then do;             /* there is a character col */
      varNames = TableGetVarName(tbl, idx);           /* get names */
      m = TableGetVarData(tbl, idx);   /* extract character data   */
      levels = countunique(m, "col");
      print levels[colname=varNames L="Levels of Character Variables"];
   end;
finish;
 
run QuickSummary(tClass);
Pass data tables to SAS/IML functions and modules

Summary

SAS/IML 14.2 supports data tables, which are rectangular arrays of mixed-type data. You can use built-in functions to extract columns from a table, add columns to a table, and query the table for attributes of columns. For more information about data tables, see the chapter

The post Data tables: Nonmatrix data structures in SAS/IML appeared first on The DO Loop.

3月 222017
 

In just a few short months the European General Data Protection Regulation becomes enforceable. This regulation enshrines in law the rights of EU citizens to have their personal data treated in accordance with their wishes. The regulation applies to any organisation which is processing EU citizens’ data, and the UK [...]

GDPR – sounding the death knell for self-learning algorithms? was published on SAS Voices by Dave Smith

3月 212017
 

If you give an artist some tools, they can create a pretty picture. Sure, they probably have a preferred tool - but they can probably do a pretty decent job no matter what you give them (paint, colored pencils, watercolor, charcoal, etc). And creating pretty graphs in SAS is no [...]

The post How to create a 'pretty' map with Proc SGplot appeared first on SAS Learning Post.

3月 212017
 

Part 504 of the US Department of Financial Services Superintendent’s Regulations seems to significantly up the requirements for firms to conduct ongoing review and continuously improve their approach to anti-money laundering (AML) monitoring. But is it really very different from the intergovernmental Financial Action Task Force's broader suggestions to introduce [...]

Anti-money laundering requirements: Are the stakes increasing? was published on SAS Voices by Colin Bristow

3月 202017
 

accessible ODS results with SASLet’s look at the term “accessible” and how it relates to the SAS world. Accessible output is output that can be read by a screen reader to someone with low or no vision, visualized by someone with low vision or color blindness, or navigated by someone with limited mobility. In January of 2017, the United States Access Board published a final rule that documents federal standards and guidelines for accessibility compliance specific to information and communication technology (ICT). The new standards and guidelines update the Section 508 law that was most recently amended in 1998, and adopt many of the Web Content Accessibility Guidelines (WCAG) 2.0 standards. Here’s a comparison document: Comparison Table of WCAG 2.0 to Existing 508 Standards. The final rule (as a parent, I appreciate this rule name!) is also known as the “508 refresh”.

To help SAS US customers comply with the visual-accessibility regulations outlined by the final rule, ODS developers are providing SAS programmers with the ability to create accessible results to present their SAS data. In SAS® 9.4 TS1M4 (9.4M4), there are three great improvements that I would like to highlight:

  • ACCESSIBLE_GRAPH option (preproduction) in the ODS HTML5 statement
  • SAS® Graphics Accelerator
  • ACCESSIBLE option (preproduction) in the ODS PDF statement

Note about “Preproduction” Status: ACCESSIBLE and ACCESSIBLE_GRAPH

Why are the ACCESSIBLE (in the ODS PDF FILE= statement) and ACCESSIBLE_GRAPH (in the ODS HTML5 FILE=statement) options preproduction? By setting the status as preproduction, the development team has greater flexibility to make changes to the syntax and underlying architecture. The development team has worked hard to provide these new features, and is very eager to hear feedback from the SAS programming community. They also encourage feedback from the compliance teams that work for those of you who are striving to make your SAS results accessible. Please request and install SAS 9.4M4 here, and start using these new features to generate your current results in the new formats. Ask your compliance team to assess the output, and let us know (accessibility@sas.com) how close we are to making your files compliant with the final rule.

ODS HTML5

The ODS HTML5 destination, which was introduced in SAS® 9.4, creates the most accessible output in SAS for consumption of tables and graphs on the web. This destination creates SVG graphs from ODS GRAPHICS results. SVG graphics scale when zoomed, which maintains the visual integrity of the image. To ensure that the results comply with the maximum number of WCAG standards, use one of the following styles:

  • DAISY (recommended)
  • VADARK
  • HIGHCONTRAST
  • JOURNAL2

In most cases, these styles provide a high level of contrast in graphics output and tabular output.[1]
When you use an accessibility checker such as the open-source accessibility testing tool aXe, you can see how the HTML5 destination compares to the HTML4 destination (the default destination in SAS® Foundation). Here is a comparison of a simple PRINT procedure step. Using this code, I generate two HTML files, html4.html and html5.html:

ods html file="html4.html" path="c:temp" ;
ods html5 file="html5.html" path="c:temp" style=daisy;
 
proc print data=sashelp.cars(obs=5);
var type origin;
run;
 
ods _all_ close;

 

An aXe analysis in Mozilla Firefox finds the following violations in the html4.html file:

Here is the analysis of the html5.html file:

Your success might vary with more complex procedures. The final paragraph of the blog post describes how to offer feedback after you test your code in the HTML5 destination using SAS 9.4M4.

SAS® Graphics Accelerator

The addition of the ACCESSIBLE_GRAPH preproduction option to the ODS HTML5 statement adds accessibility metadata (tags) around ODS GRAPHICS images routed to the HTML5 destination[2]. This metadata provides the ability to have bar charts, time series plots, heat maps, line charts, scatter plots, and histograms consumed by an exciting new add-in available for the Google Chrome and (coming soon) Firefox browsers: SAS GRAPHICS Accelerator. SAS Graphics Accelerator provides the following capabilities:

  • The interactive exploration of supported graphics using sound
  • The ability to download data in tabular format to a CSV file
  • Customization of visual and auditory settings for alternative presentations

Pay attention to the SAS Graphics Accelerator web page because improvements and features are being offered on a regular basis!

ODS PDF ACCESSIBLE

The web is “where it’s at” for most consumers of your organization’s information. However, many sites need PDF files for results requiring a longer storage time. Prior to SAS 9.4M4, using a screen reader with PDF files created by ODS did not work because the PDF files created by ODS are not “tagged.” Tags in a PDF file are not visible in Adobe Reader when the file is opened. But, when a PDF file is tagged, the file contains underlying metadata to facilitate screen readers verbalizing the results. Here’s an example of the same PROC PRINT step above written to two different PDF files using SAS 9.4M4. I created the tagged.pdf file using the ACCESSIBLE preproduction destination option, so the file includes tags, making it accessible using assistive technology.

ods pdf file="c:tempuntagged_default.pdf";
ods pdf (id=a) file="c:temptagged.pdf" accessible;
 
proc print data=sashelp.cars(obs=5);
var type origin;
run;
 
ods _all_ close;

 

 

To determine whether a PDF file is tagged, open the file and select View ► Show/Hide ► Navigation Panes ► Tags. For example, I checked the untagged_default.pdf file and saw the following, which means that this file is not useful to a screen reader:

Let’s compare the results from the tagged.pdf file:

A screen reader uses the HTML-like markup shown above to verbalize the file to someone with low or no vision.

Adobe Acrobat Pro has built-in accessibility checkers that enable us to examine the degree of accessibility of our files. You can display this setting by selecting View ► Tools ► Accessibility. A full discussion of the Adobe compliance-check features is outside the scope of this article. But, an initial examination of the tagged.pdf file shows that there are many accessible features included in the file, and that two of the features need a manual check:

Check with staff who are well-versed in compliance at your organization, and let us know if our files meet your standards.

I want to see sample code, and hear more! How do I get access to SAS 9.4M4 and more information about these new features?

Your SAS installation representative can order SAS 9.4M4 using the information on this page, Request a Maintenance Release. If you want to get a preview of SAS 9.4M4 to learn it before your site gets it, you can use SAS® University Edition (www.sas.com/universityedition).

Read these upcoming papers (available in April 2017) for code samples. And, if you are attending SAS Global Forum 2017, plan to attend the following presentations:

Here are links to the documentation and a previously published SAS Global Forum paper on the topic:

How did we do?

We welcome feedback regarding the results that you are generating with SAS 9.4M4, and look forward to offering the ODS statement options in production status with improved features and support for more procedures. Please send feedback to accessibility@sas.com.

 

[1] See “ODS HTML5 Statement Options Related to Accessibility” in Creating Accessible SAS 9.4 Output Using ODS and ODS Graphics for more information

 

Create accessible ODS results with SAS or "Why you should be running SAS 9.4m4!" was published on SAS Users.

3月 202017
 

David Loshin extends his exploration of ethical issues surrounding automated systems and event stream processing to encompass data quality and risk considerations.

The post Event stream processing, data quality and risk mitigation appeared first on The Data Roundtable.